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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (Jan.-June 1922)"

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SAN FRANCISCO l/TT. /&O SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1922 



LOS ANGELES 




Be Safe from Arrest 
Safe from Accident 




/COMMISSIONER CHAINU 
V>* has notified constables 
throughout California to arrest 
motorists whose headlights do 
not comply with the law. 

Now is the time to put Osgood 



Lenses on your car. Then you 
will be safe from arrest, safe 
from accident. Osgoods— "the 
Lens with the Bull's-eye"— com- 
ply with the law and give max- 
imum driving light. 



CHANSLOR & LYON 

Pacific Coast Distributors. Stores in AH Principal Cities 



Osgood Lens & Supply Co., Chicago 
Manufacturers 

Osgood lens 



COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

HEAD OFFICE AND BRANCHES 

Bank of Italy 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL TRUST 

HEAD OFFICE, SAN FRANCISCO 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

December 30, 1921 

RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $59,079,594.05 

Other Loans and Discounts 57,832,140.66 $116,911,734.71 

United States Bonds and 

Certificates of Indebtedness $20,983,484.52 

State, County and Municipal Bonds... 13,734,789.56 

Other Bonds 8,406,407.86 

Stock In Federal Reserve Bank 375,000.00 

TOTAL U. S. AND OTHER SECURITIES 43,499,681.94- 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank 7,563,404.97 

Cash and Due from Other Banks 16,386,667.84 

TOTAL CASH AND DUE FROM BANKS 23,950,072.81 

Banking Premises, Furniture, Fixtures 

and Safe Deposit Vaults 7,202,029.59 

Other Real Estate Owned 341,014.65 

Customers' Liability under Letters of 

Credit and Acceptances . 451,463.53 

Interest Earned but not Collected... 1,219,042.38 

Employees* Pension Fund (Carried on Books at).... 1.00 

Other Resources 604,409.19 

Total Resources $194,179,449.80 

LIABILITIES 

DEPOSITS $177,867,610.68 

Dividends Unpaid 601.802.04 

D.scount Collected but not Earned 91 285.88 

Reserved for Taxes and Interest Accrued 130,339.61 

Letters of Credit, Acceptances and Time Drafts.... 451,463.53 

Bills Payable, Federal Reserve Bank None 

Rediscounts, Federal Reserve Bank None 

$179,142,501.74 

^Capital Paid In $10,000,000.00 

'Surplus - 2,500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 2,536,948.06 

TOTAL CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED 

PROFITS 15,036,9 48.06 

Total Liabilities - $194,179,449.80 

-By the Issue of 50 000 additional shares of stock on July 3, 
1922, the PAID IN CAPITAL will be Increased to $15,000,000.00 
and SURPLUS to $5,000,000.00. 

All charge-offs, expenses and interest payable to end of half- 
year have been deducted in above statement. 

A. P. Giannini anvl W. R. Williams, being separately duly 
sworn each for himself, says that said A. P. Giannini is Presi- 
dent and that said W. R. Williams is Cashier of the Bank of 
Tt:ily. the Corporation above mentioned, and that every state- 
ment contained herein is true of his own knowledge and belief. 

A. P. GIANNINI, 
W. R. WILLIAMS 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of December, 
,C ' LI THOMAS S. BURNES, Notary Public. 

THE STORY OF OUR GROWTH 

As Shown by a Comparative Statement of Our Resources 

December. 1904 $285,436.97 

December, 1908 $2,574,004.90 

December, 1912 $11,228,814.56 

.December, 49 16 .... $39,805,995.24 
.■Decker/ 1920 . . $157,464,685.08 

De*y 3Q;;f92 1 $ 1 94, 1 79,449.80 

\ n \ ..'. '. ."NuM'BfeR OF DEPOSITORS, 291,994 

Savings Deposits made to and including January 10, 1922, 
will earn interest from January 1, 1922 



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VOL.- CXXI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1922 




No. 1 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 882 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cor-nhill, E. O, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, One 
year, $6.00; Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not be 
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

Let us not speak ill of the old year. 

* * * 

At the worst, the old year could not have been as bad 

as the best year in Europe. 

* * * 

It is to be hoped our brother editors of the dailies will 

give us less propaganda and more news in l n 22. Half of 
some big dailies, now, are boosts for grafters' schemes to 
organize new bureaus and raise the taxes. 

E. Forrest Mitchell, prohibition director, and two of 

his assistants have been injured by their automobile "slip- 
ping" on the road in Kern county. It's kind of curious, 
all the "slips" that prohibition enforcers make. Is it just 
haste? * * * 

It may have been all right to let old Debs out of jail 

before he served the last da\ of Ins sentence, but we doubt 
if the honest citizens of the Republic will light many bon- 
fires over his restoration to the puddle of Bolshevist 
politics. * * * 

Why do not the newspapers tell that the recount of 

the local election returns have shown that Supervisor 
Schniitz was second on the list. Rossi having the larg 
vote. The high vote for Schmitz was due to his effi 
for lower taxes. * * * 

Several American universities arc getting much pub- 
licity over the cows they are raising and exhibiting at 
cattle shows. Is the prize cattle stunt in our univirsities 
to take the place o\ developing burly football heroes, who 
can butt their way through a brick wall? 

* * * 

Old John Barleycorn's successor in business. Kid 

Bootleg, did a rushing business on New Year's Hay. Six- 
killed by autOS and twenty-six injured in the San Fran- 
cisco district. Private guzzling of hooch is not altogether 
the evangelical blessing to humanity predicted by our dry 
reformers, * * * 

Very gratifying is the assurance of Union Pacific Rail- 
road officials that the American people will save a million 
dollars a day on freight and passenger rates during 1922. 
More comforting, if we knew we could immediately save 
a lew shekels from the rent pirates and all the other profi- 
teer- who have us bv the throats. 



Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Schessions, owners of large oil 

wells in Texas, still peddle vegetables on the streets. They 
must be rent-racked tenants in an apartment house. 

* * * 

Joseph Silva, a painter on Mission street, ran amuck 

on New Year's Day, hit five autos and wound up by biting 
the policeman who grabbed him. Was this the effects of 
plain paint or bootleg? 

Senator Borah's publicity agent announces that the 

alert statesman will oppose the four-power pact. How 
could he favor any peaceful pact and expect to be boosted 
for President in the Hearst papers? 

* * * 

A Chicago notable of the underworld, famed for drink- 
ing 100 barrels of 5-cent I tleg whisky, has been Eound 

in the rear of a saloon Frozen to death. Not much fear ot 
the effect- of post mortem flames on that noted Chicago 
citizen. * * * 

We hope, for his own sake, that Supervisor Warren 

Shannon is prepared to present a fine report of what he has 
done to cement commercial relations with the I Incut. As 
official plenipotentiary of our city, he spent $2000 given 
him for the trip. * * * 

The principal interest in the new Board of Supervisors 

will be to see how Supervisor McGregor measure- up for 

possible Mayoralty timber. P.ig business men are not al- 
ways good politicians, and unfortunately it is impossible 
to -eparate city government and politics. 

* * * 

It is to be hoped 'hat in 1922 some Steps shall be taken 

to reduce the rates of insurance in San Francisco which 
came into existence after the lug fire of 1906 and show no 
signs of being voluntarily lessened. Is a double plat- 
firemen ami a costly fire protection system protection 
against fire in our city? 

* * * 

Registrar Zemansky i- quoted as 

system of counting votes at the City Hall instead of the 
polling place- as formerly. It i- astonishing that - 
perienced an official as Zemansky should ever have fa 
the change which is inadvisable for several Why 

did he allow it? » » * 

William O'KJeefe, 1 Id.: Harry Johnson, 21. 

Ansel Salmen. i2 : Millie Thorp. 16. and Jeanettc Thomp- 
son, 1". desperate bandits en captured in San 

county, after a chase by bloodhounds. They will pr 
be warned not to commit highway robbery again, or they 
may get a week in jail. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




Gordon Selfridge, the 
America's Loss of Foreign Trade American who runs the 

large American department store in London, has written 
in the newspapers of the contrast of Germany, unable to 
find enough hands to fill manufacturing orders, and America 
"suffering from an almost complete loss of foreign demands 
for : ts products owing to the exchange situation." Air. 
Selfridge has recently seen German}' hard at work. His 
advice to English and American merchants is to cut their 
prices. He did it in his London house in October, and the 
gratifying result was an increase of 200,000 more transac- 
tions. In November the sales further increased. 

Air. Selfridge considered it better to make drastic reduc- 
tions all along the line, which represented substantial losses 
than to concede, unwillingly to the public, lower prices 
from time to time. By one drastic sweep the buying pub- 
lic "might be convinced that bedrock, bottom prices had 
been reached" and would respond. His judgment was cor- 
rect, for his house gained 200,000 more sales in October 
and the November record was even better. 

The buying public is on strike and its psychologic condi- 
tion is that it holds off in expectation of a lower scale of 
prices. Germany is so busy that enough hands can not be 
found, for German prices can not go lower. The Germans 
know that the world is convinced of it. The German mark 
is the next thing to being worthless. The German can un- 
dersell the world. He could do it before the war, as he 
worked longer hours and was less hampered by unionism 
than England or America. He can undersell his two great 
competitors more convincingly now when he is forced to 
pay billions in reparations. He can only pay such vast sums 
by making cheap goods and selling them to the world. 
The feverish activity of every busy machine in Germany 
adds to the number of factory machines and men standing 
idle in America and England. 

The object lesson is one of great interest to America, 
where we champion so feverishly idealistic theories that the 
world owes the American worker a good living, and he must 
not be brought "into competition with the pauper labor 
of Europe." But if he expects to compete in the markets 
of the world there must be some parity of wages. Labor 
can not be paid on the basis of a dollar an hour in America 
and a dollar a day in Berlin, without an effect on the sale 
of American goods in the world's markets. And what of 
the industrious millions of Asia that are vearlv coming 
more into competition with the white man in industry? — 
the real yellow peril. 

We require far less theoretical idealism and more prac- 
tical sense in solving the serious economic problems that 
confront us with millions of Americans standing idle, while 
our blundering politicians and avaricious profiteers retard 
progress. 

The newspaper telegraphic correspondents must be 

hard up for news, judging by the daily reports they flash 
over the wire about "Mary and Doug." The two movie 
notables can not order coffee and doughnuts but the news- 
paper nuts make half a column of it. 



As the Year Opens 



The New Year opens with prospects 



that encourage every honest, patriotic 
citizen, though the immediate prospect is not as free from 
clouds as would be wished. Several grave matters have to 
be decided before the country settles down and goes to 
work as if the great war was an event that had ceased to 
have a disturbing influence on mankind. 

The relations of labor and capital are approaching a more 
satisfactory stage, but there still remain several difficult 
corners to be rounded. Both labor and capital understand 
that the sensational ideas of great gains have to be for- 
gotten. Profiteering is going out of fashion, if it has not 
really been scrapped. War wages and war profits must 
remain a mere memory of one of the great evolutionary 
periods of world history, with the death of old monarchies 
and the new aspirations of great democracies. 

In America we are faced by the necessity of adopting a 
new tariff to represent the ideas of the dominant political 
party. The two great political parties are in sharp antagon- 
ism on the question of whether America needs a high tarili 
wall, which shall be almost prohibitive, or one which will 
not endeavor to exclude all foreign competitors under the 
guise of protecting American labor from competition ruin- 
ous to American ideals. There is hardly any doubt that the 
great mass of our people have modified their ideas on pro- 
tection. We need protection, but between a modified tariff 
which will guarantee the American worker a profitable 
field, and drastic paternalism which aims to make the 
sturdy American toiler a tender exotic plant, unable to 
bear any of the winds of adversity that afflict workers in 
less favored lands, there is a wide field. We have found in 
the United States that it is best for labor itself, and for 
all who depend on its products, that we have a system 
guaranteeing healthy competition, instead of industrial 
monopoly by any class. The greatest good for the greatest 
number is the thing to be aimed at. Happily, we are at- 
taining a new and higher level in the industrial world. The 
general swing to the open shop American Plan and away 
from the system of excluding all unorganized labor from 
the market by recognizing only collective bargaining is 
sure to have a profound effect for the better on America. 
if not the whole world. 

It is impossible to estimate the good effects of the great 
conference at Washington. We are too close to that 
achievement to realize fully what it means to humanity, 
in the hopes of peace it raises in our world so long ami 
cruelly tried by war. Whatever the effects of the Washing- 
ton conference its purpose has been noble and the direc- 
tion of the experiment by our American statesmen a fine 
lesson of Americanism, endeavoring to burst the trammels 
of narrow and outworn traditions of war and national greed. 
All glory to the great men whose work for human better- 
ment has made possible the Washington conference. Those 
who are endeavoring to tear down the safeguards of world 
peace do not deserve to be praised for their iconoclastic 
work, or flattered by serious public attention to their unwise 
councils. 



Its effect in destroying public interest in all elections is 

There is always something wrong with a man, as there shown by the small' proportion of the registered voters 

is with a motor, when he knocks continually. who take the trouble to cast their votes. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 7. 1922 



The first meeting of our 
A Lesson to the Supervisors San p ranc js C0 Board of 

Supervisors in 1' '22 has been inharmonious. That condi- 
tion is likely to be characteristic of the board during- the 
year. Tilings are no longer as they were in our City Hall, 
and the Board of Supervisors is the index. The election in 
November was a profound surprise to our city politicians, 
who had fallen into the idea that our municipality was an 
heirloom — a sort of family affair where all that was neces- 
sary for a life job was to please the reigning prince and 
raise the taxes higher every year. Politicians have a habit 
of making such mistakes. 

The best proof that the November election astonished 
the politicians of the City Hall is the fuss they are making 
over a recount of the election returns, because some of the 
horses they backed did not prove they were phenomenons 
of speed. They looked more like selling platers when the 
winning numbers were hung up. 

Nothing galls a politician more than to be a tailender in 
the election returns, and if he can twist the figures to make 
it appear that he has been the victim of a wrong count, he 
will spend the last cent in the treasury to prove his alibi. 
Spending taxpayers' money is the easiest thing for poli- 
ticians. 

According to the political dope-sheet, circulated before 
the November election, the favorite at long odds was Super- 
visor McLeran. The money of the City Hall ringsters was 
all on him. Everything indicated that he should romp in 
a mile ahead of the field. Had he not been chairman of the 
finance committee of the Board of Supervisors, and was he 
not rated as "Mayoralty timber?" Would not our Chief 
Magistrate have stepped down and put the popular chair- 
man of the finance committee in his place, if the necessary 
votes of the Supervisors could have been lined up? 

The fight of Supervisor McLeran last November was well 
planned. All the legionaries were called out. Not a re- 
servist was overlooked. There was a full muster. The 
Board of Works to a man was ordered t,, report for action. 
The policemen and the firemen had their orders. The 
school teachers were reminded that the women's votes 
counted. The municipal voting battalions were embed to 
the last vote to place Supervisor McLeran at the top of the 
election returns, and yet when the figures were hung up 
both Schmitz and McSheehy had beaten him. The two 
Supervisors who were expected to be so far in ihe tail of 

the hunt they would not enjoj even the melancholj dis- 

tinction of notice amongst "the also fans." were the second 
and third in the li-t of winners, There was no mistaking the 
Significance of such election return-. It was unmistakahlv 
a repudiation of the coterie which has run our municipal 
politics for years and piled the load of taxes on the bending 
backs of the taxpayers. Seldom has there been so plain 
and conclusive a condemnation of politicians in power. 

Now what will it avail if a recount of election return- give 
Supervisor McLaren a dozen or fifteen more vote-. Will 
it alter tin fact that Supervisor Schmitz lias run second 
and Supervisor McSheehy third, beating all the admmi-tra- 
tion candidates Solelj bee their term of office 

Schmitz and McSheehy had voted for lower taxes and ob- 
servance of the charter, which ha.', been treated a- a scrap 
of paper. 

Instead of wasting time about recounts the Supervisors 
Id begin to improve their records so that all who come 
before the voters at the next election will not be defeated. 
It is hard to see what excuse most of them can otter for 
their re-election. They pronn- ices will be lower this 

year, but it i-^ hard to see how t' e miracle will be accom- 
plished. We have outstanding $48,000,000 in bond- and we 



now have issued $17,500,000 of Hetch Hetcby bonds this 
year that have to pay interest. 



British Troubles in India We have so many serious sub- 
jects to interest us in the 
United States at present, that we have paid little attention 
to the difficulties that the British Government is en- 
countering in India. From the Manchester "Guardian." 
one of the most influential British journals, we learn that 
the leaders of the political discontent in India have made 
the visit of the Prince of Wales the occasion for redoubling 
their activities — both the Moslems and Mr. Gandhi and 
his followers. In Bombay, when the Prince arrived, the 
Moslem-Hindu Volunteers preached the boycott, and when 
a large part of Bombay went out to greet the Prince they 
terrorized and assaulted many of those who had joined in 
welcoming the royal visitor. The peaceable citizen was left 
to wonder whether the British Government could protect 
the visitor against the violence of Mr. Gandhi's non-violent 
Non-Co-operators. At the same time the malcontents or- 
ganized a great "hartal," or day of mourning, in Calcutta. 
The government of India came to the conclusion that after 
mam months of toleration, it had to use the strong hand 
against both the Volunteer associations and the Non-Co- 
operation leaders. 

Several hundreds of arrests have followed. In every 
province the leaders of the movement have been seized to 
be put in prison. "The situation is serious," declares the 
"Guardian," "for some of the men arrested are men of 
high standing and great influence, and the sweeping char- 
acter of the arrest- has already led to protests from moder- 
ate Indians holding high place in the administration of the 
country. The danger is that a general policy of repression 
will merely give greater power into the hand- of the more 
extreme and violent partisans, just as it will certainly be 

used to excite fresh resentment among the masses of the 

people against the British power. Coupled with the news 
of the wholesale arrests came the information that the boy- 
cott of the Prince of Wales had been highly successful at 

Allahabad. At Benares, happily, it failed. The Indian 
Government even though it bad no alternative but to take 
some vigorous action, should recognize that the power and 
extent of the Gandhi-Moslem movement Constitute a fact 
which no amount of arrest- can abolish. It has to be reck- 
oned with coolly and wisely and by methods of states- 
ship." 

ENTITLED TO FAIR TREATMENT 



Regardless of differences that may arise from time to 
time between the railroad men and the managements ol 
the roads, all unite in desiring to give the public good 
service, declares Win. Sproule. president of the Southern 

Pacific Company. 

The railroads. Mr. Sproule points out, are permitted, 
under the Transportation Act. to earn a return only upon 
the value of so much of their properties as is used in the 
transportation business. Because this value is fixed by 
the Interstate Commerci • m, "talk about earnings 

on watered stock or inflated values means nothing." he 
said. 

After discussing the n the railroads under 

the United States Railroad I rd. Mr Sproule has 

said, "the railroads enter 1922 with the knowledge that the 
public interest must always prevail and are bending 
ment in 'hat will 

the public expectatii .ice. In return the rail- 

.- a-k the public t. see thai Fairly trea; 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AXD 



Five Dollars for a 9-Cent Knife 

By HARVEY BROUGHAM 

BECAUSE Congressman Joseph W. Fordney of Michi- 
gan, who is framing the new Republican tariff bill, 
was charged $5 at Marshall Field & Co.'s department 
store in Chicago for a German-made knife, which cost the 
importers only 9 cents, the House of Representatives has 
had some very plain talk on profiteering and protection of 
American manufactures by high tariff. The duty on the 
9-cent German pocket knife, which Marshall Field & Co. 
sold at retail in Chicago, was 20 per cent — less than 2 cents. 
The cost of transportation could not have been much, yet 
the pocket knife was sold at retail in the leading depart- 
ment store of America at $5. Congressman Fordney pro- 
duced the sales tag to prove the retail price. Another Re- 
publican Congressman produced a similar tag, showing that 
the profiteering was not an accident in a single case. In 
fact, there was no such intimation. It was not denied that 
the transaction was a regular part of the firm's business. 
It was profiteering of the kind that the unlucky American 
citizen has become used to in recent years. The question 
which presented itself to the minds of both Democratic 
and Republican Congressmen, was what remedy could be 
given in tariff legislation for such profiteering — "a profit 
of 3900 per cent," Congressman Fordney called it. 

The retail price of the German knife in Chicago was 
regulated, not by any sense of fairness to the public, but 
by the thought of exacting "all the business could bear." 
That limit was $5 for the knife which had been made and 
sold in Germany for 9 cents. It would be hard to find a 
more illuminative instance of the morality of "trade," 
which, almost invariably, becomes outright robbery when 
a fine opportunity is offered the trader. The average 
trader's tendency to squeeze the customer is no new thing. 
In the olden days of chivalry in Europe, the trader's social 
status was low. He was rated beneath the agriculturist 
and the artisan. In Japan, which is still a military nation, 
the trader is socially rated at the foot of the ladder. The world 
democracies have changed the status of the trader, by 
making the possession of money the gauge of one's social 
eminence. No matter how the money has been made, its 
possession settles all other questions. A merchant who 
retailed a 9-cent knife at a hundred per cent profit, when 
he could exact 3900 per cent, would be rated a fool by 
Bradstreet — if not by the world at large. 
* * # 

In the recent tariff hearings before the Committee on 
Ways and Means at Washington, many merchants and 
manufacturers were questioned, and all agreed that their 
course was to charge for their goods "all that the traffic 
would bear." So Congressman Oldfield stated on Decem- 
ber 20th, when the House of Representatives debated the 
profiteering triumph of Marshall Field & Co., in retailing 
a 9-cent German knife for $5 — a profit of 3900 per cent. 

Republican Congressmen, headed by Fordney. the tariff 
maker, are in favor of preventing such scandalous profiteer- 
ing by changing the tariff regulations from foreign valua- 
tion to American valuation. For instance, the German 
knife referred to was valued for the exaction of ad valorem 
duty at the German price of 9 cents. Fordney and his Re- 
publican associates would have the valuation at the Amer- 
ican price of $5. This, they assert, will cure enormous 
profiteering on articles of low cost abroad. The Demo- 



crats differ. They assert that the difference will be that 
higher duties — practically prohibitive duties — will be ex- 
acted, and the American consumer who pays the price will 
be placed in the power of American manufacturers. Con- 
gressman Fordney 's theory is that the American valuation 
will reduce the importer's opportunities for profiteering 
and increase the American manufacturer's chances of com- 
petition with foreign manufacturers. Thus, American man- 
ufacturing would be built up. American competition would 
ensue and cut down American prices to the consmer. Criti- 
cising that theory, Congressman James R. Mann of Illi- 
nois said that "the trouble with the American plan of valu- 
ation was that he had never heard anybody on the floor of 
the House who did understand it, including the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Fordney) himself." (Laughter). 

Mann's idea of tariff and Fordney's are almost diametric- 
ally opposed. Fordney is in favor of the encouragement of 
American industries by a tariff almost prohibitive. Pro- 
tection is his main consideration. Let every American 
manufacture be made profitable, so that it will continue to 
grow. Outside the high wall of tariff raised by us, let the 
baffled manufacturers of the rest of the world wail and 
gnash their teeth. That is a patriotic idea of Congressman 
Fordney, but it has the inherent danger of being capable 
of too much paternalism concern for "growing industries." 
It is possible that in the fever of anxiety for the manu- 
facturers, Congress may overlook the interests of the great 
majority of Americans, who do not manufacture, but who 
can not escape the need of buying. 



The paternal idea of tariff-making was injected into the 
debate on Marshall Field & Co.'s knife profiteering by 
Congressman Tincher of Kansas, one of Fordney's col- 
leagues, who desired to know what increase of duty would 
stop Marshall Field's profiteering on the 9-cent German 
knife, and allow American manufacturers a chance to get 
the business. 

"Of course the man who would pay the increased duty 
would be the American consumer," remarked Oldfield of 
Arkansas. 

Congressman Mann of Illinois asked Tincher if he would 
be in favor of a duty of 1000 per cent as Marshall Field's 
profit on the German knife was 3900 per cent. 

The "Congressional Record" reports the ensuing debate 
verbatim : 

Mr. Tincher — I am just wondering if we could not reduce 
the price to the American consumer in that way. 

Mr. Mann — The gentleman has suggested it. I am asking 
him the question. Is he in favor of a duty of 1000 per cent' 

Mr. Tincher — If it is necessary to protect American labor, 
and the American manufacturer, and the American producer 
and consumer from the profiteers of this country, such as 
have been disclosed by the speech of the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Fordney). I will say it is not a question of 
per cent. In the knife illustration it would seem that, based 
on the price the consumer pays for the German knife, 1000 
per cent would not affect the selling. 

Mr. Mann — Then the gentleman makes the statement that 
he is in favor of a duty of 1000 per cent on knives, does he? 

Mr. Tincher — I am frank to say to you that I, as well as 
every other member of this House, am amazed at the state- 
ment made here and at the facts presented here concerning 
this knife, and I am wondering if Marshall Field & Co. are 
justified in their propaganda to keep the duty as it is at 
present on a knife that costs 9 cents. Of course, the dutj 
even at 1000 per cent would not he very much. 

Mr. Mann — Let there be a few more statements on this side 
of the house that the Republicans are in favor of a tariff 
duty of 1000 per cent and there will not be enough Re- 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER TOR JANUARY 7. 1922 



publicans here to gather together in one aisle. (Laughter). 
1 have been here long enough to know that. 

Mr. Fordney — If the Republicans favor destroying Amer- 
ican institutions, they ought to be put out of this House. 
(Applause). 

And thus ended the tariff debate on politics, both sides 
making a grandstand play and speaking to the gallery for 
political effect. Which is one of the reasons that tariff- 
making does not belong to a parcel of small politicians in 
Washington, as it is a cold business matter of vital influ- 
ence on prosperity of the nation. Politics and sound busi- 
ness rarely assimilate. 



Why People Do Not Build 

By ARTHUR WILSON 



Our San Francisco Industrial Association is admira- 
ble in its intentions of promoting harmony in the building- 
business, but it must not lose sight of the reason why 
people build houses. It is not for benevolent purposes, 
that carpenters may earn a dollar an hour, and plumbers 
and plasterers still more, or that honest citizens can rent 
the buildings at low rates and the owners ruin themselves 
by trying to pay high taxes. No! The putting up of 
buildings is cold hard business. If anything else is made 
of it, some class is going to suffer, either the building 
trades or the public. 

It used to be, not so many years ago, that people bought 
lots and erected houses as a desirable investment. That 
was when the tax rate was one dollar on the hundred. 
Carpenters got about $4 a day and were considered well 
paid. Plumbers, who are always extortionate, got $5 a 
day. There was then some profit in owning houses, and 
it was not hard to find a fiat. 

»* * * 
That condition was deliberately changed by war on 
property owners, which the newspapers made no efforl 
to stop but rather encouraged. It was part of the general 
war on capital which has raged in the United States For 
twenty years. Laws wire passed by the Legislature and 
Supervisors placing the landlords at the mercy of their 
tenants. It was made harder to collect rents. The valua- 
tion of property for taxation was raised. The rules adopted 
in erecting buildings were designed to benefit labor and 
take money out of the landlord's pockets Every point 
that could be raised to increase the cost of building was 
legalized to benefit the unions and material men. Insur- 
ance was permitted to become an onerous trust. 

The ownership of buildings at last became a menace 
instead of a guarantee of gain. Prudent people sought 
to sell their holdings. In a word, real estate ownership 
In came dangerous to the owner's pocket and gradually 
the building trade fell off in San Francisco, as the center 
ol closed-shop industry. In Los Angeles, the open shop 
city, on the contrary, building has kept on. That city has 
grown enormously and the population has corresponds 
increased. 

* * * 

But building in San Francisco has been paralyzed, be- 
cause the unions and the politicians, and the newspa] 
that snled with them, helped to strangle the industry. The 
avet en has become convinced that it is 

too man) risks on his little cap tal to place it in build 
to rent, lie i- even timid abou owning a home, and pre- 
fers an apartment. 



Several large skyscrapers are going up, but they repre- 
sent only the efforts of rich citizens, or corporations, to 
escape robbery of their incomes by the Government sur- 
tax. _ There is building activity in the Richmond District, 
but it is chiefly in the line of small houses erected by specu- 
lative builders. There are apartment houses being erected, 
but that is not the best sign. The builders expect to reap 
the high profits that are now being enjoyed by apartment 
profiteers, who cater to a class without children, or useful 
influence on the social life of our city. 

* * * 

So timid is the building business in San Francisco, that 
on upper Market street, the great thoroughfare of our sea- 
port, only one building has been erected in ten years in all 
the blocks from Eighth to the junction of Valencia street, 
and that was erected by a bank. Block after block is de- 
voted to bill-boards for movie posters. One of the richest 
property owners in San Francisco recently tore down a 
row of dilapidated flats on upper Market street to escape 
taxation, and replaced them with a two-story poster fence 
which helps to pay his taxes. Fie claims that building costs 
and high taxes prohibit erection of new buildings. 

* * * 

These are facts that should not be overlooked by any 
industrial association. The building business must yield 
legitimate profits or people will not put money in it. Erec- 
tion of theatres and stores in the downtown district may 
be desirable but it is not enough. Erection of thousands 
of residence places in other sections is a sore need. 

Moderate wages is the first requisite .if building activity. 

Lawful protection of the property owners is the next 
indispensable. Lower taxes is the greatest of all require- 
ments. When people can hope for fair treatment in build- 
ing and owning bouses they will erect them but not s i 

The lash of a labor trust, an insurance trust, and high tax- 
ation can not be held over any public without driving it 
' Ut of the realty market. 

At present there is ity of building mechanics, for 

iiion men have been driven awaj from San Francisco 

for man} years. They prefer to work in Los Vngeles, the 

open shop city, which has had less labor trouble, and where 
in the first eight month- of 1921, no less than fifty-five 
million dollars worth of building was contracted for. By 

and by mechanics in abundance will come to San Francisco, 

if we let it be known to the world that all workmen are 
safe here ami that work i- given without question of a 
man's affiliation- as long as be is an honest citizi 



l ruon^s I Ivors WONDER GLASS 
A MARV1-I.OUS NEW INVENTION 

The "Binoculette" 




1 \ Actual 
Size 



\ ( OMBINBD OPERA ttd FIE1 I> <■! *SS. Can be carried in I man* 
vesl pocket or lady'* purse an J wetghsoal 

■'VOQ 

GEORGE MAYERLE 
Oplicul Expert and Importers of Optical Specialties 

." Y- - 
960 Market Street, between Muon end Teylor Street* 



TROMrT ATTENTION GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




Ox that willfhy Uk dml.sir, villi jm 



PUT A BEGGAR ON HORSEBACK, ETC. 



There have been so many fatalities on account of auto- 
mobile accidents this year it is almost as dangerous to 
ramble along our streets as to take a stroll on a modern field 
of battle, with the gas bombs and machine gun nests in 
action. Seriously, the ordinary dangers of our thorough- 
fares have become extraordinary, speaking paradoxically. 
What would a patriarch of the olden days of sedan chairs 
and stage coaches think, if suddenly translated from the 
place of quiet shades to our Market street, and expected to 
cross the four tracks any day at the rush hours? 

* * * 

Every clay the terrors of our streets increase. They have 
been piling up steadily, since we exchanged the steady- 
going horse-drawn vehicle of our forefathers for motor ve- 
hicles. The ancient buggy was expressive of modified 
speed. It indicated that the occupant desired to attain more 
celerity that his legs would afford. But it did not imply that 
the driver of the horse-drawn vehicle was the very spirit 
and impersonation of insensate speed, intent on overcoming 
all obstacles regardless of life or lawsuits, the wails of 
widows or the cries of orphans. For by some psychological 
process the physical act of defying space and time in a 
motor car imbues many motorists with an ambition to set 
all human laws and moral responsibilities at defiance as 
well. It seems to require a strong effort of the will for a 
man ordinarily sane and humane to retain his sanity and 
humanity when steering an automobile flying along the 
crowded streets. Much the same kind of excitement seizes 
him as the inexplicable feeling of haste, which induces mo- 
torists to cross the track of a speeding express train and 
lose their lives, to save five seconds. It is not safe to trust 
the sanest of us with the wheel of a motor car doing over 
ten miles an hour, and seldom do the tamest of us get 
down to thirty-five though we try to convince the traffic 
policeman to the contrary when justice lays her avenging 
fist on our shoulders. 

* * * 

Though our forefathers did not make every holiday not- 
able by the large increase of business at the emergency hos- 
pital and the morgue, they must have been not altogether 
free from the temptation to make the highways less safe 
for humble pedestrians. For it is an ancient proverb found 
in wise books, "Put a beggar on horseback and he'll ride 
to the devil." That proverb shows that the speedster was 
not altogether unknown to our motorless grandfathers. Oc- 
casionally some heedless individual came skurrying over 
the highway leaving a trail of broken legs and collar-bones 
in his wake before the constable halted him. But our fore- 
fathers accounted for that phenomenon by their proverb 
of "the beggar on horseback who rides to the devil." They 
attributed the disregard of the pedestrians' rights to 
over-swollen vanity of the beggar who found himself elev- 
ated to the dignity of a saddle-horse's back. 

If our forefathers lived in these days they would think 
that a great many beggars have had their heads turned by 
finding themselves on horseback. Elevated and aggran- 
dized individuals pass by or over you with as little concern 



as if you were a tomato can. It seems to be far beyond 
their comprehension that anyone limited to his legs for 
locomotion is worth considering, except as to the damage 
it would cause the varnish on the limousine to hit him 
square in the back and leave him lying on the street. 

The apparent disregard for the humble pedestrian is, how- 
ever, not all elevation of the beggarman's haughty spirit 
stirred by unusual dignity too much for humanity to stand. 
The general forgetfulness of the rights of pedestrians is 
a psychological disease — motoritis in its present aggragated 
for m . 

PURCHASE OF MARKET STREET RAILROAD 



The conditional report made of the properties of the 
Market Street Railroad Company by the City Engineer 
M. M. O'Shaughnessy shows many reasons why San Fran- 
cisco should, at this time, formulate some plan to provide 
for a permanent transportation system for the future. So 
argues the committee from improvement clubs. 

"His report shows that if a unified holding was conducted 
as economically and as safely as the present Municipal 
Railroad has heretofore been operated, there is no doubt 
that the proposed purchase of the Market Street Company's 
lines would be an advantage to the city. Mr. O'Shaugh- 
nessy says that it is not possible to determine actually the 
figures of the future earnings nor does it seem necessary 
to do so at this time though it is evident that on any basis the 
amount is large. 

"( I'Shaughnessy shows that many savings could be made 
by the consolidation and unification, notwithstanding that 
he has estimated that the cost of operating the mechanical 
parts of the system would be more than it appears to cost 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
At the Close of Business December 31, 1921 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts, Less Rediscounts $ 47,877,746.22 

U. S. Bonds to Secure Circulation 3.950.i)(io.i.iu 

Other U. S. Bonds and Certificates 5,514,333.60 

Other Bonds 10,711,502.39 

Other Assets 1,006,336.18 

Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit and 

Acceptances 9.105.912.07 

Foreign Exchange Account, Customers' Liability 245.237.00 

Commodity Drafts in Transit $ 2,177.967.64 

Cash and Sight Exchange 23.439.524.24 25,617,491.88 

$104,028,559.34 
LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 5.000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 3,421,044.74 

Circulation 3,902,700.00 

Letters of Credit, Domestic and Foreign, and 

Acceptances 9.105,912.07 

Federal Reserve Bank — Secured by Govern- 
ment Bonds 1.720,000.00 

Foreign Exchange Account 245.237. HI) 

Other Liabilities 4,927,999 55 

Depcs.ts 75,705,665.98 

$104,028,559.34 
OFFICERS 

Herbert Fleishhacker, President Victor [Clinker, Asst. Vice-Pres 

,M"Hinier Fleishliaeker, Vice- J. S. Curran, Assl. Vice-Pres. 

President J. w. Harrison, Asst. Vice-Pres. 

J. Friedlander, Vice-President B. R. Alexander, Asst. Vice-Pres. 

C. p. Hunt, Vice-President John Gayle Anderton, Asst. 
Harry Coe, Vice-President i ashier and Secretary 

w. E. Wilcox, Vice-President Geo. A. Van Smithi Asst. Cashier 

and Cashier Eugene Plunked. Asst. Cashier 

J. W. Lilientiial, Jr.. Vice- L, J. Aubert, Assl, Cashier 

President F. J. Hoagland, Asst. I'aslii.-r 

Fred F. Ouer, Asst. Vice-Pres. V. R. Pentecost. Asst. Cashier 



CALIFORNIA \PVKRT1SER FOR IAXUARV 7, V>22 



under private ownership, and that still a saving of a suffi 
cient amount would be made to pas off a reasonable install- 
ment on the principal each year. 

"He also states in fixing the estimate for value on the 
properties of the Market Street Railroad at $40,000,000 that 
the road itself operated under the city's management would 
produce more than 5 per cent interest on the $40,000,000. 

"If the word of Mr. O'Shaughnessy, who is a practical 
engineer and one who the people of San Francisco have 
confidence in, is to be taken for anything there is no ques- 
tion left to discuss excepting to arrive at a price for which 
the company will sell its holdings and to submit the same 
to the people for their decision." 



LET US HAVE INDUSTRIAL PEACE 



In the year that is closing there have been many hundreds 
of strikes in this country, with a total loss to labor of nearly 
$4,000,000,000 in wages. That is a tremendous sum — 
we won the greatest war in history with less — and from 
those who lost it, it is gone forever. And yet, though the 
wage loss is SO' prodigious, the proportion it bears to the 
nation's total loss by the harmful, wasteful, unnecessary 
strike is small, indeed. 

Industrial disputes we shall probably always have, just 
as we shall probably always have international disagree- 
ments. But we are finding a wise and peaceful means of 
dealing with differences between nations: in their settle- 
ment we are about to substitute the arbitration of reason 
for the arbitrament of war, and as a guarantee of their 
faith in the peaceful solution of their disputes, the powers 
are submitting to disarmament. Why, then, can not we 
have arbitration of industrial controversies? 

Of course, we know that the union labor leaders are 
unanimously and unalterably opposed to disarmament — 
giving up the strike as a means of warfare by which they 
can impose their extortionate demands on those with whom 
they have controversies. But must the workers, who, 
through strikes this year, lost $4,000,000,000 in <■ 
and the public, that through strikes endured untold hard- 
ships and that suffered a financial loss a- great, at least, 
as did the wage-earners, he Forever the victims "i these 
militaristic and war-loving union labor lea 

We have been told that war between nations — no matter 
P0V\ far apart in distance, speech, aspiration-, religion and 

customs- is evidence of an international barbarism. What 

may not he said of the industrial wars that are carried on 
with such ruthlessness againsl the public In men who -ay 
the} are our Fellow-citizens? If there were no way to prevent 

industrial warfare that in the pasj year a st the workers 
$4,000,000,000 and that took a heavy toll in property 

destroyed and lives lost — we should think that the ma- 
chinery ^i civilization hail broken down. But strikes and 
lockouts with all their attendant hardships and sufferings 
are as unnecessary as they are barbaric. Disputes over 
wages and labor Conditions do not have to lie fought — they 
are never settled that way — with the strike and the lock- 
out. They can he arbitrated; and only the -ide whose 
cause is unjust will reject arbitration. 

The Washington conference has adopted a no-war pro- 
gram ; Congress should pass, for interstate activities, a no- 
strike law; the State- should adopt similar measure- To 
the hodies that would enforce this legislation would be 
referred all disputed questions, ivhich would be arbitrated 
and settled without causing the workers a loss of billions 
of dollars a year in wages or imposing on the public hard- 
ships of which it is heartily tire. 1 — The Spectator. 



LINES 

Winter Sports 

at Truckee 
and Yosemite 

SKI-ING TOBOGGANNING SLEIGHING 

SKATING 

COASTERS FOR CHILDREN 

DANCING 

Reduced Fares 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO 

To Triickee on Mondays and Wednesdays j <M A flft 
Return limit B days S *P X ■•Vv 

Fridays and Saturdays Id* 11 IV 

Return ^mtMtoll ,$11. /D 

To YoSemite ° n Mondays and Wednesdays ' <fc99 9C 
Return limit 8 days •yLL.UU 

Fridays and Saturdays <t") A Tf 

wing ft / 1 1 /S 

Tuesdai iV fcu " • " 

TRAINS TO TRUCKEE 

Lv. Se I 

(Fern Station) M :80 am 1:00pm 7:00pm 

3:16 I'm 1 1 'in pi,, >. r, am 

'.', Trm kee 9 r 

: r.n am 6:30 pm 

- 
in. 

TRAINS TO YOSEMITE 

.>_ 

1:00 fin 1 I 
\r m ■■ 25 pn ' 

■ 

11:56 am n 

00 Fll 

\' > 1:16 pm 

■ in*— 

HOTELS AND PRICES 

AT TRUCKEE: Southern Pacific Hotel. 

per i carte. 1 » m and 

Lunch Counter. Other H 

IN YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK: Sentinel Hotel. 

.iit Valley. Room with pri Plan, 

im without hath. American Plan. 

ntain Hoiu - into 

the \ 

Accommodations Thru 
Southern Pacific Agents 
50 Post St. Ferry Station Third St. Station 

or Phone Sutter 4000 — Local 380 
and 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




The United States Senate has gained nothing in dignity 
by the election of members by direct popular vote. We 
were told that such a change in election methods would 
make our higher hall of National legislation so wonderful 
that the "Congressional Record" would be as brilliant as 
the aurora borealis. Every Senator would be a Circero 
or a Washington. Solomon would be wiped off the boards 
as a synonym for calm and convincing wisdom. 

But the cold fact is that the Senate has not improved 
in eloquence, in wisdom, in character or in efficiency. There 
is more of the favorite son appeal and the prospective Pres- 
idential posturing, but in the transaction of the public busi- 
ness in which a hundred million people are concerned, 
the Senate is not amazing the nation by its efficiency. A 
case in point is the criticism of the New York "Times" on 
the contest over the seat of Senator Newberry, which the 
"Times'' calls is "the latest glaring illustration of the way 
in which the Senate of the United States deliberately dis- 
ables itself so that it cannot transact the public business." 
The Newberry case is one of the highest interest. The 
right of the State of Michigan to its full representation in 
the Senate is involved. "Yet what has the Senate done?" 
asks the "Times." "It made a belated investigation. From 
the committee two reports were submitted to the Senate, 
the majority favorable to Mr. Newberry, the minority ad- 
verse. Then the debate began. It began, but there was no 
way of ending it. At first the majority set out to hold night 
sessions and force a vote. But the Marathon orators of 
the minority easily defeated that plan. One Senator read 
a report for three or four hours. Senator Pomerene held 
the floor for three days. Finally the majority capitulated. 
They humbly asked unanimous consent that a vote might 
be taken late in December or early in January. Even to 
that there was at first objection. Later, consent was 
grudgingly given for a vote in January. The most august 
assembly on earth is left helpless before a single obstinate 
member. It denies itself the elementary rights of a leg- 
islative body. 

"How long are grown men in the Senate going to permit 
this hamstringing to go on? That some of the ablest Sen- 
ators are becoming intensely exasperated by the blockades 
of business is well known. The managers of a Senate bill 
often have practically to go on their knees to opponents in 
order to get permission to pass it. They appeal to the 
'courtesy' of Senators, but frequently this is merely like Irv- 
ing to call spirits from the vasty deep. 

"The resulting congestion and inefficiency of the Senate 
are becoming more and more intolerable." The sensible 
Senators grieve over the situation, but they seem to think 
of it as one almost impossible of alteration!" 



In 1922, are the taxpayers going to permit most of 

upper Market street to remain two rows of lofty poster 
fences that pay taxes for silurian property owners? 
Those owners will not improve their holdings, or sell to 
more enterprising people. Their fences should be heavily 
taxed as undesirable and calculated to give visitors the 
idea we have an unprogressive town. 



Editor Brisbane, commenting on the death of nine 

people from bootleg whisky on Christmas Day, declares 
that "teetotal races and vegetarians amount to nothing as 
they lack energy." But Brisbane's boss has been a stout 
pillar of prohibition. 



First 

Federal Trust 

Company 

Affiliated with The First National Bank 
of San Francisco 

Savings — Commercial 
—Trust 

Post and Montgomery Streets 

Statement of Condition December 31, 1921 
RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $ 8,526,888.97 

Other Loans and Discounts 2,834,877.78 

State, County and Municipal Bonds 2.003,216.41 

Corporation Bonds 3,004,009.99 

Furniture and Fixtures 50, COO. 00 

Cther Resources 9,522.48 

United States Bonds 2,952,534.88 

United States Certificates of Indebtedness 1,859,500.00 

Cash and Due from Banks 2.999,289.76 



TOTAL $£4,239,810.27 

LIABILITIES 

Capital $1,500,000.00 



Surplus 

Undivided Profits 

Deposits 

Other Liabilities .. 

Dividends Unpaid 



425,000.00 

279,014.13 

21.986.651.10 

4,145.04 

45.CO3.00 



TOTAL 



$54,239,810.27 



OFFICERS 



RUDl 'I. I'll SPRECKELS. I',. -,,i, ,m 

CLINTON 10. WORDBN Viee-Presidenl 

•I. <'■■ HOOPER Vice-President and Trust ir 

O. K. GUSHING Vice-President 

J. K, MOFFITT Cashier an.] Secretarj 

C. II. McCORMICK ../Treasurer 

'■ R- PARDOW Assist:, in Secretai 

M. R. CLARK Assistant Cashier 

I.. A. McCRYSTLE \ssistnnt Trust I Iffli i I 

s. w. miASfiVii'ii Assistant Secretarj 



DIRECTORS 



WVATT II. ALLEN 

JOHN I . BRl n IKE 

I I. K. CUSH1NG 

J. G, HOl IPER 

Tin iMAS JENNINGS 

CLIFTON II. KROLL 

WALTER S. MARTIN 



R. d. Mcelroy 

J. K. MOFFITT 
IAMBS 1'. PHELAN 
W. T. SMITH 
RU1 ll ILPH SPRECKELS 
KOI. LA V. WATT 
BEI IRGE WIIITTICI.I. 



''LINTON E. WOHI >i:.\ 



Savings Deposits made on or before January 10, 1922, 
will earn interest from January 1, 1922 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 7, 1922 



11 



Family Tree of the Bret Hartes 



IN the newspaper telegraphic dispatches 
it has already been told briefly how 
Jessamy Bret Hart Steele, elder of the 
two daughters of Francis Bret Harte, the 
famous author of "The Luck of Roaring 
Camp." "The Outcasts of Poker Flat," 
"Tennessee's Partner," "The Heathen 
Chinee," and other imperishable stories and 
poems of the pioneer days of California, 
had been discovered as an inmate of the 
hospital for the insane at Ogdensburg, N. J. 

The family history of the Bret Hartes is 
very interesting: 

It may be that Jessamy Harte Steele is 
where she is today because she was the 
true child of her erratically brilliant father, 
and because he in turn was the biological 
and psychological son of certain strangely 
mixed and strongly marked blood strains. 

Francis Bret Harte. who died in Cam- 
herley, near London, on May S, 1902, after 
reaping and wasting abroad for half a life- 
time the fruits of the fame he had won in 
California as a young man, was born in 
Albany, N. Y., in 1836. He was the grand- 
son of Bernard Hnrte, a Jew, who came 
overseas from London in 1776 or 1777 to 
join numerous kinsfolk living in Canada, 
not very far from Ogdensburg, where his 
great-granddaughter, Jessamy. has just been 
discovered. 

According to Henry Childs Merwin, one 
of Bret Harte's biographers, those Canadian 
Hartes were a marked family, energetic, 
forceful, strong-willed and pleasure-loving 
to a superlative degree 

"One of Bernard Harte's Canadian cousins," 
he writes, "left behind him at his death no 
less than fourteen families, all established in 
the world with a good degree of comfort 
and with a sufficient degree of respect ability." 

Bernard Harte. in 1780, left hi- I anadian 
kinsfolk and went to New York, where he 
lived till 1855, dying al the age of ninety- 
nine. For twenty-two years he was secre- 
tary to the New York Stock Exchange 
Board, resigning the office only at the age 
of eighty-nine. Marrying a Jewish wife, 
he reared a large family of sons and 

daughters, « ho became res] ind in 

some cases distinguished in the life of the 
city, 

But thesteadj ■ Bernard Harte managed 

to have one mystery in his life. He married 
bis Jewish wife in 1806 But seven 
previously, in 1799, he bad married Cather- 
ine Bret, a Christian woman 

family, bul lived with her less than a year 

before they separated. The carious fact i> 

that be kept this earlier marriage secret — 

so successful!} that the descendants of the 

second marriage did not learn •■!' it till 
more than a century later, after Bret Harte's 
death 

ill the marriage of Bernard 11 irtc with 
ne son. Henrj Harte, was 
born. He was educated at Union college, 
in the State of Xew York, and married in 
1830 Elizabeth Ostrander of Kingston, 
X. I.. descendant of one of the old Dutch 
landholders of the Hudson null 
her husband's mother. Catherine Bret, had 
been r Bret 

grantee to a hugh tract around Fi-hkill. 

i>{ the Henrj Harte-Elizabeth Ostrander 
marriage. Francis Bret Harte was one of 
his several children. It is relate., of his 



father that , he was brilliant and improvi- 
dent, dragging his growing family with him 
to various parts of New York and New 
Jersey as he unsuccessfully tried to sup- 
port them by teaching, lecturing, and trans- 
lating in the eight languages of which he 
was a master. 

Finally he died, and in 1854 his widow 
took her children out to California. How 
young Bret Harte grew up there is an oft- 
repeated story. Like his father, he found it 
hard to settle down. Successively he was 
a tutor, express messenger, guarding stages 
in the Wild West hold-up days, printer, 
school teacher, drug store clerk, and editor. 
In 1862 he married Anna Griswold, daughter 
of a New York family, got children by her, 
made what living he could, and so drifted 
till, in 1868. the "Overland Monthly" was 
founded For it he wrote. "The Luck of 
Roaring Camp." and other pieces which 
brought almost instantaneous fame and a 
call from the wider world for his personal 
presence. 

In 1871 Bret Harte left California behind 
hint forever. He was the outstanding, the 
compelling literary figure in the America of 
that day. 

Remembered also by persons still living 
are the exotii personality of the man. his 
nal charm and magnetism. 

Alter a few years on the Atlantic -f.i- 
board, where he was constantly lionized, be 
... , i abroad, to be lionized still more. He 
W ent as a United States Consul, and after 
his appointment expired remained in Eng- 
land till he died. 

i hit ,.i the crowded story of his life 
,i, ,,,.,.' i g« which are .if bear- 

ing hen \ii'"it 1880 he and his 

rated, for some reason which neither of 
ver explained. And when he died, in 
I was found that, though his writings 

had earned him very large sums of money, 

he left II" .state behind him for bis .le- 
ts Basking in the sunshine of his 
rity. he had spent as he went along. 
According to one report, he had been im- 
provident i nough t.. s, II evci 
wrote on a cash basis instead of retaining 

tin copyrights, which would : 
lifelon '•> him and his four chil- 

dren 

louds the famil- 
Bret Hartes .n't. r the -, paration 

ami his wife about 
iher. Henry Harte. n 
did the fan St any permancn' 

His family, like that of many 
writers and other celebrities, has ' 

Harte. 
the eldest New 

York, where he died in I**>1. Francis Kins 
the Othei lid to have con- 

tinued to live in England and to have mar- 
:'icrc. F.thel. tl si daughter, 

d with her mother, while the other. 

nship. 
She came to the Unh to the 

ath. In 1"01 she married Henry 
Milfor - tit the marriage was not a 

and her husband filed 
st each other. 
r that she dropped fi - o be 

found in 1907 in the almshouse at Portland. 
Me Theatrical friends in Xew York City- 
led funds for her by means of a bene- 



fit. But it did her little good. On August 
20, 1915, one "Jessamy Steele," described as 
living at 329 East Thirty-third street, New 
York, was taken to Bellevue hospital by 
another woman, who stated she was "Miss 
Harte," the patient's sister. 

The patient was confined in the psycho- 
pathic ward at Bellevue for eight days, re- 
moved from there to Central Islip, and now, 
six years later, has been discovered in the 
St. Lawrence hospital, across the border 
from Canada. 

What a story for the famous author who 
wrote "The Luck of Roaring Camp" and 
"The Outcasts of Poker Flat!" 



Sunbeams 



Wife— Darling! Darling! 
Husband — Yes. my dear? 
Wife — Don't he silly. Charles. I was calling 
Toodles. — London Mail. 



Arthur — Most people are not what they 
used to be. 

John — How's that? 

Arthur — Children. — Nebraska Awgwan. 



North — Did you enjoy the banquet? 

t— Very much. I wasn't hungry any- 
way, and a telegram called me away just as 
the speeches started. — Life. 



Kriss — How docs the doctor manage to have 
his hills paid so promptly? 

Kross —He gives a prescription with every 
receipt a- a bonus. — Xew York Sun. 



Doctor — Hang that telephone — I w. 
late ! 

Wife -What, was the patient dead, darling? 
Doctor— Dead? No, he was all right again, 
udon Opinion. 



"Have y..n any complaint to make?" asked 
in visitor. 

replied the life convict. 
"There ain't nearly enough exits from this 
place" -Xew York Sun. 



the policeman. 
"I'm just watching the world go by." said 
the tramp. 

"Vim can't do it on a street corner 

fl income and a club window." — Birming- 
rahl. 



The Prof 

inasmuch as it will cut 

The Cym r sir. a diamond 

nil even make an im- man's 

heart. — Town T • 



Patron— S 
worth two dollars. 
Ma' I man 

:e the leading lady in the third act? 

Manager— Well, he squeezed her so hard 

,nt for two 
I .liars? — Birmingham Age-Herald. 



The 

■ ear. 
The Hobo— Just about that. You see. I 

• geles 

"imes. 



12 




ociot 




Receptions 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin followed her cus- 
tom of receiving all her friends on New 
Year's Day. and many of them called dur- 
ing the afternoon. The Martin house in 
Broadway was attractively trimmed with 
Christmas greens and berries, and several 
friends assisted in receiving. 

Mr. and Mrs. George McGowan gave 

a large reception in the gold hallroom of 
the Fairmont on Xew Year's Day. The 
large buffet table from which the refresh- 
ments were served was covered with a 
beautiful cloth of silver and silver baskets 
of Russell roses completed the artistic ar- 
rangement. The hosts were assisted in re- 
ceiving by Gen. and Mrs. Hunter Liggett, 
Col. and Mrs. George Winterburn; Messrs. 
and Mesdames Charles Gardner. Osmun La- 
trobe. Frank Preston. Arthur Bigelow. Chris. 
Buckley. lr.. Miss Virginia Deahl. Several 
hundred friends called during the day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Barton Bean were among 

Millers who entertained friends at an old- 
fashioned eggnog party. 

An enjoyable event of the week was the 

large reception and ball given by the Jap- 
anese consul general and Madame Shichitaro 
Yada at the Fairmont hotel Wednesday. The 
affair was in honor of Viscount Euchi 
Shibuswa and his party, who are at present 
in the city. The consular staff were in at- 
tendance and many officers from both branches 
of the service were in full uniform. Madame 
Schumann-Heink. who is a persona! friend 
of Madame Yada. was a guest at the affair 
and sang a number i songs luring the 
evening. 

Mr. and Mr-. Joseph A. Donohoe and 

their daughters Miss [Catherine, Miss Chris- 
tine and Mis- Mary Donohoe, who are in 
the Houghton house in Franklin street this 
winter, received their frcnds Sunday. 

One of the large Xew Year's receptions 

was that given at the Lichtenberg home in 
San Rafael by Mr*. I Ziel, Mr-. 

Harry Johnson, Mrs. Dubois and Miss Lich- 



NO TAX ON GLASSES 

After January 1, 1922 
eat < xedlt is 'Tin Congressmen Kahn 
ami Nolan and California's United s t : 1 1 • ■ >■ 

ing with thi 
tical people in modifying ■■ Ta\ 

Law so thai it does not apply 1 

. i ■ _ sses aftei J 
W. D. Feonimore J. Vt". Davis A. R. Fenairoore 




San Francisco 



I 181 Post Stre.l 
' 1 2508 Mission Street 

Oakland 1221 Broadway 

Berkeley 2106 Snattuck Avenue 



tenberg. Many of their friends from town. 
Ross Valley and San Rafael were there and 
also some of the young friend- of Miss Char- 
lotte Ziel. 

Mrs. Carlo Sutro Morbio. formerly Mrs. 

Patricia Henshaw of Los Angeles, was host- 
ess at tea at her home in Westwood Park 
Tuesday, complimenting Mrs. Pio Alberto 
Morbio and her daughter. Miss Alberta Mor- 
bio. who are leaving in February for Eu- 
rope. They will take the Mediterranean 
cruise and will enjoy an extended visit on 
the continent. Miss Estelle Xolan will 
make the trip with the Morbios. 

Dances 
On Saturday night the peninsula con- 
tingent will be together at a cabaret and dance 
at the San Mateo Polo Club. While the af- 
fair is open to the public, the price of a 
ticket being the only requisite, it has all the 
fun of a private party, as most of those who 
will go will assemble prior to the affair at 
dinner parties down the country. Mrs. Gerald 
Williamson and Miss Helen Crocker are man- 
aging the affair. Supper will be served cabaret 
fashion during the program. 

Dr. and Mr-. Harold Fletcher and Mr. 

and Mrs. Albert Evers entertained about 100 
of their friends at a merry masquerade party 
on Xew Year's Eve. The brilliancy of the 
costumes and the festive decorations created 
a true carnival atmosphere. The great rooms 
of the Ka-par Pischel home on California 
street were thrown together for dancing, and 
supper was served in the conservatory. 
In honor of their sons. Roger and Her- 
man Kent, who are home from school for 
the holidays, Mr. and Mrs. William Kent 
gave a delightful Christmas dance at their 
home in Marin on Friday evening. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kent were assisted by Mr. and Mrs. 
William Kent, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. Stan- 
leigh Arnold. 

At the Marin Golf and Country Club 

more than 1IKI members of the Ross and San 
Rafael winter Colony assembled on Xew 
Year's Eve at one of the merriest parties of 
the holiday season. 

Busy Cupid 

A wedding of the Christmas season was 

that of Miss Vnita Van Pelt, daughter of Mr. 
:-nd Mr-, \rthur Van Pelt of Oakland, and 
Charles Frederick Royce, Jr., of San Fran- 
ding took place at the Stan- 
ford Court apartments, Rev. J. L. Gordon 
officiating. 

Half a hundred of the smart set from 

sides of tlie bay were present Xew Year's 
evening at the v. . . Granville David 

Abbott -on of the Granville Abbotts of the 
Cr 'cker Highlands, ami Mi-- Lorene I 

which took place at the home of the 
bride's mother, Mrs. Louis Landsberger, in 
San Francisco. Rev. Henry Shires, pastor 
of Christ Episcopal church in Alameda, read 
the marriage service, after which there wa- 
a reception and supper. The bride and her 
mother formerly made their home in Clare- 
mom, and tlie former is a graduate of Miss 
Heatl's school. She is a beautiful girl and 
belongs to a family well known in the bay 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER ANT) 



region. Abbott is a former student of the 
University of California and a member of 
the Claremont Country Club. His sister i- 
Mrs. Eugene Eby I Ruthe Abbott i. whose 
wedding was an event of a few months ago. 
At a handsome tea which she gave Tues- 
day afternoon at her home on Jackson street. 
Mi-- Cornelia Gwynn, daughter of Mr. and 
Mr-. John R. Gwynn. announced her engage- 
ment to Cyril H. Cormvallis-Stevenson. The 
marriage will be an event of the early sum- 
mer. The bride-elect has been one of the 
favorites in the younger set of society since 
her graduation from one of the local private 
schools. She was not formally presented to 
society, but has shared in all of the social 
attars of the debutante set for the last two 
-ta-'ins 



Luncheons 

Mrs. Percy Kessler, who. with Colonel 

Kessler, will soon sail for the Philippines, 
was the principal guest at a luncheon given 
Thursday by her mother. Mrs. Q X. Ellin- 
wood. The luncheon took place at the Town 
and Country Club. 

Mrs. Hope Slater of Washington, who 

'ling Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker 
at Burlingame. was the principal guest at a 
luncheon given Sunday by Mrs. Sydnej I Io- 
nian at the Burlingame Country Club. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Welch gave a 

luncheon Monday at their home in Burlin- 
game for Mrs. Hope Slater. 

Miss Doll} Madison Payne, who is to be 

one of the bridesmaids at the wedding in 
February of Miss Ruth Lent and H- 
Leonard Underhill, will entertain at luncheon 
at the Fairmont hotel on Saturday, January 
14th. Miss Lent will be the complimented 
guest. 

Dinners 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Cameron's 

Jala Xew Year's Eve party at their home 
in the country attended the Crocker party 
afterward. Among the guests were: Messrs. 
and Mesdames Ross Ambler Curran, Robert 
H. Smith. Joseph (I, Tobin. Rudolph Spreck- 
els, Walter Salisbury. Thomas Eastland Al- 
exander Rutherford. Xion Tucker. Alexander 
Hamilton. I. Frank Judge, Dr. and Mrs. Her- 
bert Allan, t'ol. and Mr-, Sydnej t 'Ionian : 
Mesdames Mai el Cluff Wilson. Willard X. 
Drown. Miss Helen Garritt. 

There was a family reunion of the Fay 

family Sunday night at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Fay on Broadway. There were 
twenty-seven people at dinner. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward 1. Tobin were 




ii O" 



Rxperience it in 

Action I 

Pioneer motor Company 

OF SAS hRASClSCO 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 7, 1922 



13 



hosts at a dinner at the San Mateo Polo Club 
on New Year's Eve. The affair preceded the 
fancy dress ball given at Uplands, the 
Charles Templeton Crocker home ill Bur- 
lingame. 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Kuhn and their 

daughters. Miss Katberine and Miss Mari- 
anne, gave a dinner Tuesday evening for 
members of the debutante set. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Welch were hosts 

at a small dinner at their home in Burlin- 

game on New Year's Eve. Later the party 

attended the ball at the Templeton Crockers'. 

In Town and Out 

Miss Marie Louise Potter came from an 

Eastern boarding school to pass her vacation 
wit;i her mother, Mrs. Ashton Potter. They 
have been in Monterey during most of her 
stay. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Nugent, Jr., have 

closed their house in Santa Barbara and have 
come north to San Mateo, where they have 
taken a house for three months. 
Mrs Henry A. Whitley and her daugh- 
ter, Miss Ruth Whitley, are spending the holi- 
days at the Ambassador hotel in Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory Parrott. 

Mrs. Jane Selby Hayne, Miss Helen Crocker, 
Miss Josephine Grant, Stanford Gwin, Wil- 
liam Crocker, Richard Schwerin, Raymond 
and Gordon Armsby are leaving on the 9th 
for a motor trip to Miami Lodge. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Fleishhacker and 

their children have gone to Southern Cali- 
fornia. They participated in the New Year's 
Day rose tournament at Pasadena. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran of 

Paris arrived in time to join the New Year's 
Eve festivities at the Templeton (rocker 
home on Saturday night, their many friends 
giving them a warm welcome. The Currans 
are house guests at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Hayes Smith. They plan to 
OCCUpy their own home down the peninsula 
in the spring, and will probably remain here 
indefinitely. 

Mrs. T. Stewart White is visiting her 

son. Stewart Edward White, and Mrs. White 
at their home in San Mateo. Roderick Whiti 
is also a guest there. 

Mrs. Macondray Moore is passing the 

holidays with her daughter. Mrs, Vlvah 
Kaime, and Mrs. Kaime at Pebble Beach Mrs 
Kaime returned a few days ago from Pari-. 

Mrs Chilion Howard (Maisie 
borne) is lure from Montreal visiting her 

parents, Mr and Mrs. lames Potter Lang- 
horn e. 

Two attractive schoolgirls who have re- 

I in lit ,1 to California for the holidays are Mi-- 
Helen Hammersmith, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Ufred B. Hammersmith, and Miss 
ii, l.ii Slater. Mi-- Hammersmith, with her 
parents and a party of friends, went to Del 
Monte for the X u Year's Eve celebration. 

uin 1 K. Swensen and Mrs. S 
spent the holidays at the Virginia hotel. Long 
h, and will return home em tin 15th. 

i riant Swensen will 
Verba Buena. 

Pictures hie Beach has been en- 
joyed by many honeymoon couples, 'eluding 
Dr. and Mrs, lames 1 ncisco. 
Capt. and Mrs. Robert Oldys of Honolulu. 
Mr. and Mrs. Reed Funs ton of San Pran- 

Mr. and Mrs. Ransdell M 
San Francisco, Mr. and Mr- H. 
of 1 and Mr. and Mrs \\ m. B. 

Banni 

Mrs Paul T. Carroll of San 
entertained her mother and brother Mrs. 1. 



Kingsley Rich and Bobby Rich, on a pleasant 
visit to Del Monte. 



BABYLON "DOWN THE ROAD" 



Ancient Babylon had nothing in cheeriness 
on the "Babylon down the road," on New 
Year's day. Visitors who attended the 
opening saw the old Ohio building of Ex- 
position days transferred into a fairydand 
with sparkling fountains, gold fish, a fine 
orchestra, etc. The 200 tables were filled 
and the menu left nothing to be desired. 
The party — a full-dress affair — did not break 
up until daylight, which is not so early these 
winter days. Many social notables were 
present and declared their visits would be 
many and they hoped equally enjoyable. 



TECHAU TAVERN EVER-GROWING 
IN POPULARITY 



Perhaps it is on account of the famed 
Techau Tavern orchestra; perhaps because 
of the entertainment or of the cusine, or per- 
haps on account of the wonderful dancing 
floor ; we do not know the exact cause ; suffice 
it to say that Techau Tavern is drawing greater 
crowds than ever. The afternoon luncheon 
brings throngs of smart San Franciscans to 
the portals of this famous cafe. The informal 
and pleasant atmosphere and the unusual and 
moderately priced luncheon served at the 
Tavern is, no doubt, sponsor for this. Inci- 
dentally. Techau Tavern is the only cafe hav- 
ing music with its luncheon. In the evening, 
tlie high-grade entertainment and the music 
make the hours pass very quickly. On Tues- 
day and Friday nights, amateurs hold the 
center of attention. There are many scream- 
ingly funny situations, songs and act-. Every 
night Lucky dances are held. There is no 
competition. And the prizes are Melachrino 
cigarettes and Gruenhagen's chocolates. 



The holiday season is at an end but tin re 
;- no abatement of the social interest in 
events at the Fairmont hotel. This fine hotel, 
the heart of the city, yet SO i;n 
removed in one respect, attracts all busi- 
ness men who desire a luncheon which in 
service and surroundings is as enjoyable as 
a home meal, yet is only a few minutes 
distant from their offices. 



San Francisco Plating Works 

184S-C1 MISSION ST., I n l loili 

E. G. Dennlston, Prop. Phone Mark. 

We plate every description of metal work 

and goods with Gold. Silver, Nickel, 

Brass. Copper and Bronze >n an 

elegant and durable manner 

We call tor ai rk 

Automobile and Household Goods a 

tally 



■>\A for the Best it Business Training 



Munson fPf §1 School 



FOR 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Send for Catalog 



QUALITY 1866-55 Yean- 1 92 1 QUANTITY 
Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burlingame Redwood City Menlo Paik 

San Mateo Woodside 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Street* 

San Francisco Phone 916 

San Mateo Phone 1488 

ECONOMY DURABILITY 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest improved multiple needle machine. 
Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street, Suite 723 Whitney Building 

Phone Douglas 5232 
Oakland, Suite 424, First Nat. Bank Building 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Eyes Guaranteed 

Bother OO Work at 
You? 27 7th St. 

DR.J.P.JUHL 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing 
manuscripts tor publication, which is im- 
portant to people who write. Frank 
criticism and revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 

at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Smicr 6130 

Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 
« * * * * « 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

JEWELS In Platinum 

* * » * * * 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

* « • * * • 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

* * * • « * 
FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

* * * * * * 
EXPERT Repair Work 



Cosgrove's Hair Store 
and Beauty Shop 

360 (ieary Street. San Francisco 

Permanent Hair Waving 

WE have installed in our high- 
establishment the latest, 
and most-perfectly equipped 
waving the 
Of the treatment are a 
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ndance and thickness. Since the 
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ir is not left harsh or brittle. Our 
ire experienced, capable and 
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fidence. 
Telephone Kearny 2842 for appointment 

Facial and Scalp Treatments, Marcel- 
ing. Manicuring, Hair Dyeing, Etc. 

2331 Telegraph Ave. nr.Durant, Berkeley 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 





FINA NCIAL^ 




By P. N. 

Well, Here We Are in 1922. Imagination 
has very largely to do with the hop over 
into a new \ ear and the fact that we make 
ourselves think that something has really 
happened and that we are started on a new 
lap in the life race. Of course, something 
has happened and the turn in the year is just 
a natural turn but the new year is not go- 
ing to be different from the one that has 
just passed away unless we are different in 
our outlook. 1921, as far as the average 
business was concerned, was a bad year. 
It was a year of losses and retrenchment 
and lack of vision and the hard task of 
gathering up of the ruins of tag ends, after 
the war. It was a period of rough adjust- 
ments and watchful prayerful waitings. 
October was probably with many, the worst 
month of the year. In November, retail 
trade began to show gains and December 
sales results were, for the most of those in 
retail business, very gratifying. 

* * * 

December began to show some activity 
for those w'ho are engaged in foreign trade 
and seemed to promise a quicker develop- 
ment in the future. 1922 promises to be 
a year of very slow improvement for the 
foreign trader. His welfare is so closely 
related to world politics that it may be 
said that, unless there is a much quicker 
agreement arrived in the question of dis- 
armament, as to the various countries hav- 
ing large, medium-sized and small revolu- 
tions or near-revolutions on hand, settling 
these questions with as much speed as pos- 
sible, the establishment of some means of 
stabilizing exchange, the adoption of an 
international currency based on gold, and 
the solution of a thousand and one other 
factors, there will be but a halting progress 
toward that prosperity the whole world is 
crying for and demanding at the hands 
of its rulers. 

* * * 

The arms parley is practically over and 
much good has been accomplished despite 
the efforts of the Hearst and allied press 
to prevent. The Irish question is Hearing 
a solution. Russia is sloughing off the doc- 
trines of communism. China may be placed 
in a position where she may enforce a con- 
tinued peace in her war-bedevilled domin- 
ions. Japan has, to a very large extent, 
drawn the teeth of her enemies by the wise 
behavior of her representatives at the Wash- 
ington pow-wow. There seems to be a 
chance that even Turkey is going to settle 
down to some sort of quiet life. Chile and 
Peru are going to settle the Arica-Tacna 
question, without having recourse to the 
use of cannon. London will soon have an 
economic conference of all nations in full 
blast. Every nation on earth is interested 
in arriving at a better understanding. That 
being so, there is no reason why such an 
understanding should not be arrived at. As 
each question is threshed out and settled 
by mutual consent the condition of the 
world will change toward times of prosperity. 

The San Francisco missionaries of com- 
merce, who went abroad to spread the 



BERINGER 

gospel of good will and trade expansion, 
are back and have been given a great re- 
ception. The benefit that is to accrue, not 
only to the city of San Francisco and to 
the State of California but to the entire 
country, will not be felt immediately. Each 
member of that party, who had his eyes or 
ears open to something besides the gro- 
tesque and the picturesque, has had an 
addition of a vast amount of knowledge 
given him. He probably does not now real- 
ize what he has gained by the trip. He 
knows he enjoyed himself and that he saw 
and heard much but the solid worth of 
what he saw and heard will only come to 
him through the application of the know- 
ledge derived, to the practical operation of 
his business. And this application will lie 
made unconsciously and automatically. The 
returned missionaries of commerce should 
be an inspiration to the foreign traders, who 
stayed behind, and it should stimulate these 
to better and greater efforts. Just now. 
the foreign traders of San Francisco and 
the metropolitan bay district seem to be en- 
joying a very profound and dreamless sleep. 
It would be a pity to waken them. 

* * * 

And. now that we have had the trip to 
Asia, let us contemplate a trip by represen- 
tative men to Mexico. We have had such 
trips in the past made by a very small 
number of people at a time and by people 
who were not truly, in many instances, rep- 
resentative of the commerce and industry 
of California. Mexico is doing wonders 
with herself. Those wdio have watched 
carefully the unfoldment of the policies of 
President Obregon and Irs advisors arc 
unanimous in their endorsement of these 
policies. The Obregon government is a 
very strong one but. at the same time, it 
is giving attention to anything that will 
make Mexico of the future a most wonder- 
ful country. Potentially. In agricultural 
possibilities, in mining, and in the industries, 
Mexico is one of the wealthiest countries 
in the world. And she is our nearest neigh- 
bor on the south and we know very little 
about her; just about as much as we know 
about Canada, on the North, and that is so 
little that it is lamentable. 

* * * 

The recent rains have done a world of 
good. The whole State had some of the 
welcome precipitation. The two storms 
bringing the most moisture were freakish 
in character.. One came from out of the 
ocean to the southeast and the other from 
the northwest but neither of these storms 
raised the levels of our inland rivers to 
any great extent. Usually, the storms de- 
scend from the north or from the east and 
deluge the interior. Very little rain has 
fallen in the Hctch Hetchy region, so far. 

* * * 

Several of the larger industrial plants about 
the bay district have shut down for an in- 
definite period. It is to be hoped that there 
will be no more of this. Our industrial 
population must be kept busy and manfac- 
turers will eventually find the "hiring and 



firing" process a very expensive proposi- 
tion. In many instances, it pays better to 
cut down the activities to half or quarter 
time and keep the men on the pay roll. 

* * * 

The investigation as to the prices exacted 
from the people by merchants is now going 
on in San Francisco. We respectfully sug- 
gest that the Department of Justice agents 
give their attention to the small combina- 
tions, called Merchants Boards of Trade, 
in the suburban towns adjacent to San Fran- 
c'sco. In many places all prices are settled 
by conference, the extension of credt is reg- 
ulated, and the business of the town or vil- 
lage merchants is run, from butcher, grocer 
to candle-stick maker, as a close corporation. 
In a number of places the prices are from 
live to fifteen per cent higher than in San 
Francisco. And in San Francisco the prices 
are from five to twenty per cent higher 
than in Oakland, as regards many of the 
daily family necessities. 

* * * 

Shipping — So, Seattle will get two, San 
Francisco three and Los Angeles five of 
tlie big combination freight and passen- 
ger liners of the Shipping Board. I do not 
believe that Seattle could use more and 
San Francisco will probably find it difficult 
enough, under present day conditions in ex- 
port and import, to keep these and the other 
vessels of her merchant fleet cargo full, com- 
ing and going. But what Los Angeles is 
going to do with these five vessels is be- 
yond me. It cannot be denied that Los 
Angeles has built for itself one of the fin- 
est protected roadsteads in the world and 
it cannot be successfully denied that she 
is building up a foreign trade. It is, how- 
ever, a matter that will be most difficult 
to demonstrate that she can profitably use 
the vessels just allocated to her. Time will 
give the answer. 

* * * 

Insurance — The Central Life Assurance 
Society of the L'nited States. Des Moines, 
is now established in California. There 
will be eight agencies in the State super- 
vised by the home office. Jack Hazlett. 
formerly with the Travelers, is with the 
company as agent at Fresno. The agents 
at Sacramento and at Los Angeles have 
been appointed. 

* * * 

A Keen Rivalry — Much interest is being 
manifested in shipping circles as to whether 
Kincaid who was the assistant director for 
the Shipping Board on the Coast, or Ham- 
mond who was the manager for San Fran- 
cisco for the Luckenbach Company, is to 
be given the management of the Atlantic. 
Gulf and Pacific here. Both men arc experts 
in their line. Kincaid is rated as second to 
none and Hammond has a fine record. 

* * * 
Reliable and Popular 

The annual statement of the Humboldt 
Savings Bank is admirable. The total as- 
sets are $19,737,128.64. The capital is $1,200.- 
000. the surplus $500,000 and the undivided 
profits $74,000.61. The hank is one of the 
oldest as well as most reliable in the State, 
having been in business since 1869. The 
concern enjoys the good-will of the com- 
munity as well as the confidence. The 
motto of the concern is "courteous and ef- 
ficient service." The officers are: Alexander 
Keyes, president; Wm. H. Crocker, vice- 
president: W. A. Frederick, vice-president; 
H. C. Klevesahl. secretary and cashier: Paul 
A. Pflucger. assistant vice-president. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 7, 1922 



15 



Automobile 



How to Use the Clutch 
Always let the clutch in gradually. Never 
release it suddenly, because this will jerk the 
whole driving mechanism, and set up un- 
necessary strains, to the extent sometimes of 
a broken axle or spring. 

Bent Knuckle Affects Wheel 
A bent steering knuckle will throw the front 
wheels out of alignment. The steering knuckle 
must he straightened, as no amount of ad- 
justing will improve steering conditions. 



Preserving Luster on Hood 
You frequently see the luster on a motor 
hood completely gone, and infer the motor 
heat has ruined it. This is true, but only in- 
directly. It is due to washing the hood be- 
fore the motor has cooled off. The rapid dry- 
ing due to the heat caused the loss of gloss. 



Spring Bolts 

In order to get best service out of the 
spring bolts on your new car it is advisable to 
turn grease cups down every time you take 
the car out. If these spring bolts are neg- 
lected, excessive wear will result. 



Hum in Transmission 

A humming noise in the transmission may- 
be due to an excess of heavy grease. The 
case should never be more than two-thirds 
full. The best lubricant is a heavy nil that 
will run. or a grease of such a consistency that 
it will flow. Under no circumstances should 
a heavy grease be used unless the lighter lubri- 
cants leak out. As gears generally track 
through a heavy grease and receive no lubri- 
cation whatever, the lack of the proper lubri- 
cation may lie the cause of a noise in the 

gearbox. 

An Oiling Hint 

Before oiling a chassis, make sure that all 
oil holes, even if they are protected with 
covers, are free of dirt. Placing oil in the 
proper cups does not always indicate that the 
frirl ion surfaces beneath are receiving lubri- 
cation. If the oil surface is clogged, probably 
no oil will penetrate to the point where it is 
needed. It is a good practice to inspect the 
oil cups and their channels tit frequent in- 
tervals. 

In Case You Forget the Jack 
Bang! Emergency brake, hasty exit from 
the ear and a hurried inspection of the tires. 
Right front down. A quick upturning of the 
front seat and an invoice of the tools there 
shows that the jack is missin Back 

home in the garage. 

That's the luck of the motorist ten miles 



from home and not a house in sight. Finally 
the tire is removed and the slow journej back 
to town is made on three tires and one rim. 

The next time you start on a trip cut two 
or three pieces of wood from one by four 
strips two inches longer than the distance be- 
tween the under side of the front wheel hull 
and the ground. Cut a slight notch in one 
end and store these away under the seat 
somewhere and forget them. Then when you 
start off in a hurry some morning and Forget 
the jack, you have a mighty good subject 
right under you. 

Even though there is no one with you. the 
car can be jacked up in short order. The 
jack is set against the hub and the ground 
Back in the car you start the engine and with 
one foot on the brake and the other on the 
clutch, you drive forward until the jack is 
perpendicular. It isn't as hard to stop at this 
point as might be supposed. After the re- 
pair has been made, the car is driven forward 
and the jack released. If, at the point when 
the wheel is clear of the ground, you find 
a block to slip under the front axle, the re- 
pair may be made much easier. By cutting 
the two jacks to different lengths, you will 
have one which will take care of both the 
front and rear axles. 



Speedometer Pointers 
When the speedometer pointer vibrates, it 
may be due to loose unions, connections, flexi- 
ble shaft bent too sharp, lack of lubrication, 
or the gears not meshing properly. When 
there is no indication of speed, the above 
causes may also be suspected, together with 
the possibility "f a broken link in the shaft. 
Noise may also be due to the above causes 
or a lack of lubrication. In examining the 
speedometer for trouble start with the wheel. 
Examine the main and pinion gears and the 
swivel joint. Make sure that all the con- 
nections are tight around the swivel joint. 
See that there are no sharp bends in the 
cable. The bends in speedometer cable should 
be gradual, having a radius of not less than 
eight inches. If the shaft connection at the 
speedometer head is tight, the chances are 
that the trouble is in the instrument itself 
and it should lie returned to the maker for 
repairs. 



Madge I wondered why Charlie borrowed 
m\ old belt ? 

Marjorie -You know you told him be was 
the first man you'd ever loved, SO he gave 
the belt to an expert who discovered about 
ISO diffen nl inger-prints on it— Ji 



Some of the laws you have helped to frame 

"I'm not complaining." replied Senator Sor- 
ghum. "Even Moses could not insure strict 
enforcement of so simple and explicit a set 
of rules as tile Ten Commandments." — Wash- 
Star. 



Mk, -Ukkcm 



\\eu, 



18 POWELL ST. 

%** 7tV**liet St 



4MUte£L 



130 OFAKUELL ST. 

Qpponie QtfkeaMs Ti&iire. 



Comfeoiisfy S&ves its patrons' with. £ood foooC 
ii moderate prices in pleisnt sttnottudii^s uu£ wru excellent Itltts^c. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILS0NBR03.C0.,Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone Park 271 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily— 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large menu, 

which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

French Dinner $1.50 

Including tax, week days and Sundays, 
5 to 9 p. m. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH STREET, Above Kearny 
Phone: Douglas 2411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Best Equipped and Most Modern 
Garage ll'esl of Chicago 

THE CENTURY 

Two Blocks from Union Square 

675 Post Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Between Taylor and Jones 



Phone Franklin 3685 




AutoFender & RadiatorWorks 

Metal \Vcrk Appertaining lo ■* utomohiki 
Oxy-Acetylwie Welding — BUcksmilhinz 

HW. CULVER M. DABERER E. JOHNSON 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




PL/EASURE/S WAND 



A Foyful New Year at Orpheum 

Foy cometh with the New Year! And 
Orpheum audiences were highly diverted hy 
the amusing antics of this remarkable 
family of comedians, large and small. Their 
act is admirablv built to emphasize the gifts 
of each member of the family group — and 
unquestioned is their popularity. 

For jugglers we have the Worden 
Brothers — clever and exciting — but one 
among the audience murmurs, "Please don't 
do it on my account." when the brea. It- 
catching stunts occur. Difficult? Yes 
Why not impossible? 

The gay songs of Al Raymond and Tom 
Schram pleased every one and fitted in well 
with the holiday spirit. "Hard-boiled Hamp- 
ton" is Harry Holman's laugh-producer. 
Rockwell and Fox, "Two Noble Nuts," also 
get a share of applause. 

Ed Janis' Revue is still going strong. 
Moss and Frye, in "How High Is Up?" con- 
tinue to capture their hearers and to create 
much mirth. On the whole, a highly com- 
mendable New Year program. 



California 
Mabel Normand has the distinction of be- 
ing the second star to hold a picture for a 
two-week run at this theatre. The old-time 
comedy is present in goodly quantity in 
"Molly-O," but there is also a large portion 
of good humor cleanly portrayed, and not 
a little dramatic work, which brings out 
the finer qualities of the diminutive star's 
ability. Sennett has made no attempt to 
make this film conform to the latest ideas 
in movie construction, being content to 
enterta'n the patrons with refined comedy. 
While his attempt is far from perfection, he 
has produced a picture which is being en- 
joyed by all classes, and is to be con- 
gratulated for his departure from pie-throw- 
ing-slap- stick business. 



Sequoia Little Theatre 
The Sequoians have not been idle during 
the few weeks since they shut up shop for 
the holidays and for rehearsals. Miss Bren- 
ner tells your critic that her capable little 
company is now well organized and going 
strong. Certainly Tuesday evening, when 
the new season opened, we had a most 
favorable impression of the good judgment 
of this clever young director and the 
spirited acting of her company. A more 
delightfully selected program could hardly 
be thought of than this one: "The Shep- 
herd in the Distance," Oriental pantomine; 
"The Altar Candle." Yale prize play; "The 
Bowery." an American bit. The Sequoia 
theatre is on Washington street, near Van 
Ness avenue, a very convenient spot for 
hundreds of San Franciscans, who are thus 
fortunate in not having to go far afield for 
an evening's good entertainment. 



The Players 

It is characteristic of the Players, so un- 
erring is their artistic taste, to open the 
glad New Year with a good thing like 
Moliere's "Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme," and 
as we go to press the first performance of 
this brilliant satire will be given by the 



Obey No Wand but Pleasure's. — Tom 

talented members of Reginald Travers' 

company. 

Columbia 
Again is San Francisco made to realize 
her gratitude to the Columbia management. 
In bringing to the Coast the Russian Opera, 
the Geary street theatre has opened a door 
to a new and wonderful world. Opening 
on Monday evening w r ith "Pique Dame." 
the brilliant group of artists who come to 
us from a tour of the Orient are singing in 
their own rich language. "Carmen." "The 
Merma'd." "Romeo and Juliet," "Eugen 
Onegin," "Lakrne," and "Dubrovsky" this 
week, and an equally interesting list for 
next week. The singers we have thus far 
had the good fortune to hear have voices 
of unusual beauty, and the operas are given 
with a rare perfection of detail. 




Alcazar — Bravo, Benvenuto! 
Louis Bennison reappears with the popu- 
lar local company in his own dramatization 
of Benvenuto Cellini, the famous Florentine 
artist. We forgot the discrepancies between 
the biography and the play as we applauded 
his uproarious doings. With a bravado 
hitherto unknown to the stage, in the 
presence of royalty, the bon vivant dashes 
through four scenes in a whirlwind of sud- 
den death and love, aided by pretty Gladys 
George and an exceptionally good imper- 
sonation by Charles Yule. Benn'son d : s- 
plays at times a real dramatic ability. His 
sets are very good, the lines in places witty, 
though the play is not constructed as 
strongly as it might be to bring out the 
famous dialogue between Benvenuto and 
Baccio. As a change, the play is a fine di- 
version and a sure cure for the blues. 



Granada's Elaborate Bill 
Fanny Hurst mamtains her reputation, 
at whatever level it may have reached, in 
her "Just Around the Corner." The action 
of this endeavor is centered about the 
slums of New York and its none-too-ele- 
vating atmosphere. There is little that is 
novel, much undesirable and some that is 
impossible. But then, a combination of 
typical movie directors, with Miss Hurst 
furnishing the theme, causes us to expect 
the picture presented. Mr. Ayer, however, 
with Mr. Partington's genius in the offing, 
has given us another treat in the ballet per- 
formance. The lavish settings are indi- 
cative of the management's desire to give 
us of their best, and the packed house fre- 
quently expressed appreciation. Wallace 
and his organ, too, are an unbeatable com- 
bination. 

"Theodora" at Imperial 

It would be impossible to describe even 
briefly the spectacular "Theodora." Subsi- 
dized by the government, the Italian pro- 
ducers fairly outdid themselves in their fi- 
delity to detail and accuracy. Though not 
so thrilling as "Cabiria," this picture, even 
in the cut form, contains elements which 
should make the Hollywood magnates sit 
up and take notice. The handling of the 
dramatic sets shows an appreciation of 
values which seems to have escaped the do- 
mestic producers. We certainly are in- 
debted to the foreign market for some fine 



film offerings, our thanks extending to the 
Imperial management for the presentation. 
Needless to say. the management has seen 
to it that the settings and musical numbers 
are appropriate. 



Coming Alcazar Attractions 
"Up in Mabel's Room," the famous Broad- 
way comedy success, one of the biggest 
laughing hits in a decade, will be the attrac- 
tion at the Alcazar beginning Sunday after- 
noon, January 8th. 

Wilson Collison and Otto Harbach wrote 
the play and it was staged in New York by 
A. H. Woods with John Cumberland in the 
leading role. In the Alcazar production. 
Dudley Ayrcs will have the star part with 
Gladys George in the leading feminine char- 
acterization. 

At Orpheum Next Week 
Favorite names plentifully sprinkle the 
Orpheum bill for next week. Fred Lindsy, 
the unequalled stock whip expert of the An- 
tipodes is a headliner: Sallie Fisher in Claire 
Kummer's comedy. "The Cii ir Rehearsal." 
will be welcomed; Frank Kellam and Patricia 
O'Dare will present their specialities in a 
singing, talking and dancing act; Charles De 
Haven and Freddie Nice will give an exposi- 
tion of eccentric dance; Frank Farron will 
treat the audience to a monologue full of 
good songs and stories; Johnny Muldoon and 
Pearl Franklyn will appear in "A Revelrj of 
Song. Dance and Music ;" the Ruth Howell 
Duo will thrill with aerialist stunts. Eddie 
Foy's fun revue will remain another week. 



Clever and Novel Plays 

Nathaniel Anderson, director of the Pacific 
Players, announces their second production for 
evenings of January 23d and 25th at Sorosis 
Hall. The playlets to be given are "Sunset." 
by Jerome EC Jerome, of international re- 
pute and author of "The Passing of the 
Thin! Floor Back." and "Getting Unmarried." 
bj Winthrop Parkhurst, who also wrote the 
music fur Tony Sarg's Marionettes. 

In their efforts to he unusual, little theatres 
in choosing their plays have often been en- 



Wedding Presents— The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



m vftvotMiu.% 



III 
scog 




j T <S\frW«v&^uix t ■ 

MA J£v EES 25 ™ 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 

ALWAYS A GREAT SHOW 

Smoking permitted in dress circle 
and loges 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 7, 1922 



dangered by sinking into the depths of vague- 
ness. In the Choice of the two mentioned 
plays Mr. Anderson lias secured both novelty 
and clever dramatic interest. 

The casts of the Pacific Players will be 
as follows: Paul Merrick. Nathaniel Ander- 
son, Robert Phillips, Jane Seagrave, Winifred 
Buster, Mary Joss Jones and Chanita Tel- 
Ins. Althea Burns will sing. 



statements of the Hiliornia Hank. Humboldt 
Bank, Federal Trust. Crocker National 
Bank. Anglo and London Paris National Bank 
and Bank of Italy appear in the News Letter 
this week. 

ADMITTED TO PARTNERSHIP 



FAMOUS SCIENTIST WILL LECTURE 



The fourth of the present series of free 
popular lectures under the auspices of the 
Astronomical Society of the Pacific, will be 
siven by Doctor Robert A. Millikan at Na- 
tive Sons' hall on Friday, January 13th, at 
8 p. m. His subject will be "Seeing the In- 
visible." The lecture is open to the public. 



BANKS IN SPLENDID CONDITION 



The statements of the banks this year are 
particularly gratifying. San Francisco is 
notably a great financial center and never 
have its banks been in better condition. The 



An announcement of interest to all who 
buy stocks and bonds is that Robert M. Rid- 
ley, who has long been connected with Mc- 
Donnell & Co., has been admitted to part- 
nership in that firm and is now associated 
with H. L. Mack as resident partners. 

DIVIDEND NOTICES 

BANK OF ITALY, junction Market, Powell 
and Eddy sts.; Montgomery Street Branch, S. E. 
corner Montgomery and Clay sts.; Market-Geary 
Branch, junction Market, Geary and Kearny 
sts.; Mission Branch, 3246 Mission st., near 29th 
st.; Park -Presidio Branch. 926 Clement st.; Polk- 
Van Ness Branch, 1541 Polk st.; Eureka Valley 
Branch, corner 17th and Castro sts. For the 
half-year ending December 31, 1921, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four (4) per 
cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 
on and after Tuesday, January 3, 1922. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of interest as the principal from Jan- 



THE CROCKER NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Condition at Close of Business 
December 31, 1921 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts $28,460,942.70 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 5,841,197.66 

Other Bonds and Securities 824,393.16 

Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 150,000.00 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 737,260.88 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10,786,859.88 



LIABILITIES 



i 'apital 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 

Circulation 

Letters of Credit 

Deposits 



OFFICERS 



nit. ii. CROCKER i'" ■ idem 

IAS, '. PAGAN Vlee-Pn Idei 

W. GREGG Vl< • I 'resident 

,1. B. McCARGAR Vice-President 

WILLIAM W CROCKER Vice-President 
F < | wii.i.is Cashier 



B. I'. DEAN 
l M HASTEN 
Ii. J. WURPH1 
\ C READ 
w. D. LUX 
J. A ROUNDS 



\v. EBN ER \-.i-t int Cashier 



546.800,654.28 

$ 2,000.000.00 

6,152,363.79 

2.000.00D.03 

818,854.38 

35,829,436.11 

$46,800 654.28 



Assist ' 

Vssistani Cashier 



II. C. SIMPSON Manager Foreign Dept 
G PERIS BALDWIN 



H. H.HAIc.IIT Asst . M.i jn Dept 

Auditor. 



we. 1 1 i iroi kei 
i hai Ii s T i 

.llS. .1 Fa :. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

.i \Y. SCOtt 

Chas. E. Green 



s. P. B. M 

J. B. McCargar 

William W. i 



£>au Jtfranrtgrn (Ehrmttrl? 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



;,;, DEPOSI1 

1 ' ' " ' ' EARN 

OTTEREST FROM .1 \\i 

A. P. GIANNINI, 



MKSI FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY, 

Montgom. rj and P. st sts.- For ha] 

ending December 31, 1921, a dividend he 
declared at the rate i,f four i n ,„ , 
annum on all savings deposits, payable on e 
after January ::. 1:122. Dividends not called for 
are added to deposit account and earn dividends 
from January 1, 1922. Deposits i , r be- 
fore January 10. 1922, will earn interest from 
Ji ary 1, 1922. 

JAMES K. MOFFITT, Cashier. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK, 7S3 Market 
si., near Fourth— For the half-year ending De 
eember 31, 1921, a dividend has been declared al 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits, payable on and after Jantiarj 
3, 1922. Dividends not called for are added I" 
and hear the same rate of interest as the prin- 
cipal from January 1, 1922. Deposits made on 
or before January 10, 1922, will earn interest 
from January 1. 1922. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 



ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK, S. E. corner 
Montgomery and Sacramento sts.; North Beaeh 
Branch, eorner Columbus ave. and Broadway- 
Fur the half-year ending December 31, 1921, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
i ii i"i' cent per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on and after January 3, 1922. Dividends 
nut called for will be added to the principal ami 
bear [he same rate of interest from January 1. 
1922. Deposits made on or before January' 10, 
1921$, ^'dl earn interest from January I. 1922, 

A. SBARBORO, President. 



THE FRENCH AMERICAN BANK (Savings 
Department)— For the half-year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1921, a dividend has been declared al the 
rate of four (Ii per cent per annum en all de- 
posits, i ayable on and after January 8, 1922. 
Dividends nut called for are added to ami bear 

the same rate of interest as the principal from 

January '■ 1922. Deposits made on or before 
January 10, 1922, will earn interest from Janu- 
ary I. 1922, LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 



THE HIBERNIA SAVI.MIS AND LOAN Si i- 
i'IKTY. corner Market, McAllister and Jones 
sts — For (lie half-year ending December 31, 1921, 
a dividend has been declared at the rat,- of tour 
Mi i'er cent per annum on all dep"siis. payable 
ii an. i ..ii. a- Tuesday, January ::. L922. Divl- 
a Ided I depositors' ae- 
■ .'11111: i hereof, a nd will earn 

dividends from January 1. 1922, Deposits in id'' 
i airy la. 1922. will draw inler- 

i si m 'in Ja Ileal y 1. 1922. 

R. M. TOBIN, Sei n la.'. 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND 
LOAN Si u 'ikty n in. i street, San 

a., n 1 1 
s. Park-Presidio Dlstr rai i h, i (1 ■ 

ii., nt a i ave. Halght st la el In i a' Ii. 

Halght and -is. — Fur the hall eai 

.■■ ding I i," ember L dlvldl 

red ai the rate of four .nai one-quarter 
■ per annum on all d< 
after J urn 
led for .are added r the deposil 
and earn dividends from Jam De 

made on or before January 10, 1922, will 
earn interest from January 1. 

' TOURNY, Manager. 



MERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY, main of- 
Savings Ui 
' st and Grant ave. and O'Farrell at 

d on saving 

i nnurn, paj 

A dividend not 

i ii dividends 

R, M. WEI.ril, Se> r 



For the half- 

. 

■ num on a'l 
teres 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



JANUARY 7, 1922 




"Not even in the world of crooked finance 
can more accomplished swindling and 
trickery be unearthed than among the fakers 
who trade on the misguided and undiscern- 
ing enthusiasm of wealthy art collectors. 
In Paris and the art centers of Italy especi- 
ally, an entire industry flourishes on the 
production of 'antiques' and 'old masters' 
for modern greenhorns." declares Riccardo 
Nobili in his history. "The Gentle Art of 
Producing Spurious Works of Art." 

Mr. Nobili has. in a richly informative 
volume, laid bare a state of things in the 
world of art that is truly amazing. 

One of Mr. Nobili's most interesting dis- 
closures is that the Italian Government con- 
nives at the exportation of spurious art and 
thereby the swindling of collectors in 
other countries. By law fine works of art 
are not permitted to be exported, except by 
license, the object being to prevent the 
country from being further denuded of its 
masterpieces. The officials responsible for 
administering the law frequently discover 
the truth about what at first sight seems to 
be an old master when the dealer, to ob- 
tain the exportation permit, produces a 
photograph of the work before its "restora- 
tion." The inspector, being satisfied that 
the work is a sham masterpiece, grants the 
necessary permit and still another fake is 
put on the market for the unwary. 

Very instructive is what Mr. Nobili calls 
the production of a faked atmosphere, in 
which the collector is thrown off his guard 
and humbugged. An impecunious aristo- 
crat, or just a plain everyday crook posing 
as a nobleman, swears that the object to be 
disposed of has been in his family for gen- 
erations. Sometimes spurious works of art 
are sent into remote country places which 
are said to be unexplored, and here the col- 
lector believes he has made a wonderful 
"find." At auction sales all sorts of strange 
influences are at work to the undoing of the 
collector. Agents of art forgers and other ■ 
interested partner impersonate the character 
of the disinterested outsider and get into 
conversation with unsuspecting art and 
curio hunters. Myrmidons of dishonest 
dealers run up the bidding against enthusi- 
astic amateurs. Everywhere traps and 
snares are laid that only the experienced 
connoisseur and frequenter of salesrooms is 
clever enough to avoid. 

It is important to remember that prac- 
tically all the old masters and other valu- 
able art work of ancient and Renaissance 
times which it is the ambition of collectors 
to obtain have now been accounted for and 
disposed of and that consequently what pur- 
port to be hitherto unknown originals must 
be regarded with the greatest suspicion. 
That fact ought in itself to be a sufficient 
warning, but it is not the only consideration 
which should direct "collectomania" into 
other channels. The cult of the antique de- 
prives living and often struggling artists of 
the recognition which they assuredly de- 
serve and which is absolutely necessary if 
art. especially in this country, is ever going 
to flourish. If we had a sane and healthy 
attitude toward art, collectors would seek 



out the original and distinctive creations of 
today instead of foolishly regarding nothing 
of value unless it belongs to a past era. 
One of the paradoxes of the situation is that 
present-day talent, which might be en- 
couraged to produce new and vital art, is 
driven into the devious ways of fakcry by 
the demand for old masters. This, of course, 
hardly applies to artists living in America, 
for the production of fakes is not one of 
our industries, but in Europe most of the 
spurious art is the output of men who were 
denied a decent livelihood when they wanted 
to do their own work in their own way. If 
collectors were not, generally speaking, so 
utterly deprived of true artistic sense, "if 



they were not such a pack of fools and 
snobs," the appreciation of many living 
artists would not be made impossible by the 
desire to possess work signed by the illus- 
trious names of bygone days. 

The enormous growth of fakery in art 
is not a reassuring sign for modern culture. 
but a symptom of a deep-seated malady, 
which can not be accounted for altogether 
by the statement that a fool is born into 
the world every second. A country where 
art does not flourish as the essential and 
spontaneous self-expression of the people 
has something wrong with it. Why this 
should be the case in all civilized countries 
is too large a topic for present discussion. 
but one aspect of the problem becomes 
startlingly clear in the interesting book 
which Mr. Nobili has sardonically entitled 
"The Gentle Art of Faking." 

Mr. Nobili might have added a good chap- 
ter to his work on the San Francisco fakers 
of painting purporting to be by those great 
masters, the late William Keith and the 
late Thad Welch. 



SAVINGS— COMMERCIAL— TRUST— SAFE DEPOSIT 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK 



FOUNDED 1869 



DECEMBER 31. 1921 



ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 
This STATEMENT is so arranged that it can be easily understood by everyone 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK 

owes Depositors $17,963,128,03 

These deposits represent 
the combined deposits of 
our Savings and Commer- 
cial Departments. To se- 
cure these deposits, our in- 
vestments are so made as 
td give diversified asse t.s. 
Most of these can be' 
quickly turned into cash. 

Our ASSETS and INVESTMENTS 
are: 
1 — Cash on Hand and in 

Banks 1,672,886.30 

Gold, currency, silver, 
checks and money on hand 
and on deposit with au- 
thorized depositories pay- 
able on demand. 

2 — Loans on Real Estate... 6,690,920.43 
These consist of First 
Mori waives i>ii California 
Real Estate — in no case 
exceeding 60 per cent of 
the conservative value of 
the property. 

3 — Loans on Stocks and 

Bonds _ 1,363,445.52 

Pays ble generally within 

six months and amply se- 
cured by high-grade Stocks 
and Honds. 

A — Other Loans 1,254,418.09 

Some secured — ot tiers lor 
lai.---iii.-ss ].iii-|h..s,v pay- 
able generally within three 
months. 

5 — Loans to States, Coun- 
ties and Cities 1,001,997.54 

in the United States, hav- 
ing a small debt and a 
population over 20,1 



6 — United States Liberty 

and Victory Bonds $ 1,036,617.19 

7 — Bonds of States, Coun- 
ties and Cities 3,590,964.62 

In the United states. 

8— Other Bonds 2,019,188.14 

Mostly Public Utilities. 
I Eenera lly underlying and 
easily salable. 

9— Bank Premises 1,000,000.00 



7,944.01 



98,746.80 



10— Other Real Estate 

11— Armor Plate Safe De- 
posit Vaults 

Protected by electric bur- 
glary alarm system and 

located on the ground 

II" III . 

Making total ASSETS 

of $19,737,128.64 



12— Leaving a difference of .$ 1,774,000.61 

which represents — 

Capital $ 1,200,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 74,000.61 

These sums represent the 

Sti i k holders' guarantee to 
the depositors, and consti- 
tute i he basis on which 
we build and will con- 
tinue tu build a sound a nd 
complete bank with Sav- 
ings. < Commercial, Trust 
and Safe Deposit Depart- 
ments, 

Our BONDS and our BUILDING have a greater market value than the amount 
shown on this Statement. This Bank has been in business since November 24, 1869. 
During that time we have made many thousands of friends, which fact is one of our 
most valuable assets. The Beard of Directors, the Officers and Employees are en- 
deavoring to maintain and develop that good will by rendering good, efficient and 
courteous service. 



OFFICERS 



Alexander D. Keyes Presidenl 

Wm. H. Crocker Viee-Fn sidem 

W. A. Frederick Vice-Presidt nl 

H. C. Klevesahl Secretary and Cashier 

Paul A. pfiueger Asst. Vice-President 

V. M. Smith Assistant Cashier 

E. H. Monroe Assistant Cashier 

J. A. Spears... Assistant Cashiei 

Keyes & Erskine Attorneys 



DIRECTORS 
Wm. H. Crocker. Pres. Crocker Nat. Bank 
W. A. Frederick Capitalist 

Wm. Fries I'n_-s. Calif. Fruit Canners Assn. 

Rudolph Herold, Jr. insurance 

Alexander D. Keyes President 

Geo. L. Payne Pres. Payne's Boll Works 

R. D. Robblns, Jr. I 

John G. Sutton Civil Engineer 

P. Zlmmermann Capitalist 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



$ 24,826,000.00 
17,125,000.00 



Aggregate Assets, 31st 
March, 1921 




$378,462,443.00 



OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

358 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua 

(New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian 

Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS 526 California Street, San Francisco, Calif. COMMERCIAL 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and Twenty-first Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement Street and Seventh Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31, 1921 

Assets $71,851,299.62 

Deposits 68,201,299.62 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds.... 2,650,000.00 

Employes' Pension Fund 371,753.46 



A dividend of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (454) per cent per annum was 
declared for the six months ending December 31, 1921 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 

Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6%% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICK. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 *15, 000,000 Reserve Fund 

Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. EXG: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS, 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Pulace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"The Palace Way" 

Rates; 35c per day; $7.50 per monlli 

Phone Douglas 243 

SIX FLOORS FOR SERVICE AND STORAGE 
OF AUTOMOBILES 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive 
and durable boxes containing five hundred 
perfect sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The 
manuscript covers are sold in similar boxes 
containing one hundred sheets. Order 
through your printer or stationer, or, if so 
desired, we will send a sample book showing 
the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 

37-45 First Street San Francisco 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 
No visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) . . 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays $1.75 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 



Phone Douelas - 



STATEMENT 

Of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

HIBERNIA BANK 

Dated San Francisco, December 31, 1921 

ASSETS 

1 — Bonds of the United States ($14,503,050.00). of the State of California and 
the Counties. Cities and School Districts thereof ($14,994,800.00), of the 
State of New York ($2,149,000.00), of the City of New York ($1,000.- 
000.00), of the State of Massachusetts ($1, 162,000.00 1, of the State of 
Nevada ($100,000.00), of the State of Michigan ($60,000.00). of the State 
of Oregon ($51,000.00), of the County of Bergen, N. J. ($1SO,000.00). of 
the County of Cuyahoga, Ohio ( $69',000.00 ) . of the City of Chicago. 111. 
($643,000.00), of the City of Philadelphia, Penn. ($350,000.00), of the 
City of Cincinnati, Ohio ($250,000.00), of the City of Cleveland, Ohio 
($205,000.00), of the City of Albany, X. Y. | S200.000.00 ) . of the City of 
St. Paul. Minn. ($100,000.00), of the City of San Antonio, Texas ($62,- 
000.00), of the City of Jersey City, N. f. ($50,000.00), of the Citv of 
Dayton. Ohio ($25,000.00), the actual value of which is $35,054,606.38 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds, comprising Steam Railway Bonds ($1,768,000.00), 
Street Railway. Bonds ($1,164,000.00), Quasi-Public Corporation Bonds 
($2,613,000.00), the actual value of which is 5,010,894.30 

3— Cash on Hand 3,193,883.02 

A — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which 

is 31,018,629.76 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said Corpora- 
tion, and the payment thereof is secured by First Mortgages on Real Estate 
within this State, and the States of Oregon. Nevada and Washington. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is 450,951.04 
Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned bv said Cor- 
poration, and are payable to it at its office, and the payment thereof is 
secured by pledge of Bonds and other securities. 

6 — (a) Real Estate situate in the Citv and County of San Francisco ($635,- 
460.11), and in the Counties of'Alameda ($13,992.67), San .Mateo ($24,- 
020.00). Los Angeles ($15,335.92), and Contra Costa ($33,267.68), in 

this State, the actual value of which is 722,076.38 

(b) The Land and Building in which said Corporation keeps its said of- 
fice, the actual value of which is 981,656.43 

TOTAL ASSETS $76,432,697.31 

LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation Owes Deposits amounting to and the actual value of 

"hich is $73,338,971.07 

2 — Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3,093,726.24 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 1Z!"ZZ$76,432,697.'31 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS \ X I) LOAN SOCIETY, 

By E. T. TOBIN, President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AXD 1 OAN SOCIETY, 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 

City and County ol San Francisco — ss. 

E. J. TOBIN and R. M. TOBIN, being each duly sworn, each for himself, says: That 
said E. J. TOBIN is President and that said R. M. TOBIN is Secretary of THE 
HIBERNIA SAVINGS AXD LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and 
that the foregoing statement is true. E. J. TOBIX, President. 

R. M. TOBIX. Secretary. 
_ , ., CHAS. T. STANLEY, 

Subscribed and sworn to before me Notary Public in and for the Citv and County 

this 3d day of January, 1922. of S an Francisco, State of California. 



PaL 




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SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1922 




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From the quarry 
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COXTRACTORS 



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ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. XCX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1922 



No. 2 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, One 
year, $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does tint solicit fiction and will not be 
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

■ Why isn't mince pie put under the prohibition ban as 

well as wine or beer? More dyspeptics are driven desperate 
by pie crust than wine. .j, * $ 

Supervisor Dick Welch has a new scheme to open up 

the San Bruno marshes to "a million homes." The genial 
Richard has all his colleagues beaten to a frazzle on free 
and valuable advertising. 

What will the politicians do when there will be no 

longer an "Irish question," and some brand new one has 
to take the place of the old reliable puzzler, which has 
stood the wear and tear of jawsmiths and journalistic word- 
twisters for 700 years? * * * 

"The Hearst papers are always and only pro-Ameri- 
can," and the San Francisco absentee publisher adds that 
he would die for his principles. But let no one confound 
that with a declaration that lie will die for his principle-;. 
He has to get some first. 

* * * 

Nobody attempts to rob a postoffice these days, though 

only a few poorly-paid I". S. Marines guard them. All our 
high-priced police could not keep away the bandits. That 
is something for serious-minded citizens to think over. 
Are our State and county governments even feebler or 
more corrupt than most of us believe? 

* * * 

And now it transpires that the soldiers have been steal- 
ing liquor from the hospital supplies at the Presidio and 
getting intoxicated on guard duty. Is there any function 
of government that the fanatical prohibition manifestation 
called "Prohibition" does not affect? 

* * * 

Harr Wagner and a number of artichoke magnates of 

Halfmoon Bay are talking of reviving the Ocean Shore 
railroad. Before we get wildly excited over it. let us know 
if the promoters can raise something with more construc- 
tive energy than artichokes or pipe dream.-? 

* * * 

One would think the postmastership was a job big 

enough for any man. but the newspapers have it that 
Mr. 1 lays is to head a film combine at a salary of S130.000 a 
year. U, S. Judge Landis is head baseball adviser with some- 
thing like $60,000 a year, besides his judgeship. Are offi- 
cial positions becoming merely incidental? 



City hall officials are becoming more conservative 

about spending the people's money. The election commis- 
sioners have voted against incurring the expense of a use- 
less election recount. They realize that they are responsible 
on their bonds for expenses uselessly incurred. 

* * * 

Enforcement officials announce that they are tracing 

cargoes of whisky from Canada with which the Pacific 
Coast is being soaked. It is easier to trace the route of 
the cargoes than find any that the bootleggers have left 
lying around for the sleuths to wet their whistles with. 

It never seems to occur to Editor Brisbane of the 

Hearst syndicate, whose special job is to hammer the Wash- 
ington pact, that people can differ with him and be worth 
considering. "I am Sir Oracle and when I open my mouth. 
lei no dog bark," is the $100,000 editor's, or rather the 
1 learst idea. * * * 

Thousands of wild geese, dazzled by the three street 

lights in Lemore, sat on the board sidewalk until the be- 
lated citizens ran home for shotguns. So says a special 
dispatch. The New Year hooch at Lemore must have 
been particularly exhilarating. Where was our Tom 
Brown? * * * 

Most people think the newspaper-- too large. If the 

newspapers cut OUl the propaganda stuff that publicity 
nls shove on them there would be plenty of room for 
all the real news people read. One can read a Paris paper 
of 500,000 circulation over his coffee and get all the news 
he wants. * * * 

Of course, there can lie no doubt that the four-power 

pact will be equivalent to a sentence of extinction to all 
the California politicians who have been keeping them- 
selves in the limelight by making ugly faces at the Japs. 
and pretending to fear a race war with Asia. They will 
sink out of sight like the old anti-Chinese howlers of the 
sandlot, * * * 

The Supreme Court says that Richard M. Hotaling, 

the well-known clubman and amateur actor, shall hand 
over $1,000,000 worth of Hotaling stock to his aged mother, 
who will doubtless hand it back to her heirs. To 
such a suit looks like a legal excuse to give the lawyers a 
nice New Year's gift. » * * 

Eureka. Humboldt county, is all excited over the 

burglar who broke into a lawyer's office and did not take 
away the "valuable heirlooms" in the office safe. He must 
have been a "freak." declares the Eureka local press. He 
certainly was. Nobody but a freak, overdue on the home 
tor the feeble-minded, would break into a law. 
box any time, and especially after Christmas. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




1/DITOR.IAL COMMEU 




The suggestion that the war 
Increase of Drunkenness debts owed to the rj nited states 

by Europe could be used for the benefit of our veterans has 
set loose a storm of angry opposition by Drys in Congress. 
The "Congressional Record" contains many speeches telling 
how successful is Prohibition in the reduction of drinking 
and the increase of prosperity. The savings banks, it is 
alleged, are overflowing with the money saved by working 
people who formerly spent every cent on drink. In some 
small places in Kentucky the jails have been converted 
into lodging houses, there being no longer any prisoners. 

The peculiarity of Prohibition propaganda is that it tells 
of the wonders in out of the way places, but leaves untold 
the facts about populous localities, where all is not going 
well with fanaticism. 

The shiftiness of Prohibition propaganda was shown in 
the crusade of Pussyfoot Johnson, who set out to convert 
the world to pure water. Great Britain gave him such an 
unfriendly reception that he lost an eye. That was a 
lamentable occurrence, for all reformers are entitled to a 
safe hearing. The decent people of Great Britain did not 
approve of the rough treatment given the American cru- 
sader by students. In fact, his mishap was a boom to his 
cause, but he nevertheless made no useful headway in the 
British Isles. He failed conspicuously in Scotland, where 
he tried to arouse the voters in favor of a local option 
election. 

Seeing that his British crusade was a failure, Pussyfoot 
shifted his battleground to Norway, and next heard of him 
he was headed for India. Pie was ostensibly going to 
wean the Asiatics from the wine cup and the brimming 
beaker, though the world knows that the hungry Asiatics 
can barely buy the few handfuls of rice that keep them 
from starvation. Poor devils ! A month ago Pussyfoot 
sailed home to America. He still draws his fat salary 
as an apostle of fanaticism somewhere in the United 
States, for all those earnest reformers are hired men. It is 
difficult to reason with Prohibitionists, who orate of the 
imaginary progress of their cause. They will not stick 
to facts. 

Instead of Volsteadism being an impressive success, as 
announced by Dry orators in Congress, it is a dismal and 
hopeless failure, which can never be made otherwise. From 
every large city has come the same similar stories of holi- 
day transgressions of the Eighteenth Amendment. Prom 
North, South, East and West have arrived the tidings that 
never was old John Barleycorn more hypocritically glee- 
ful in his secret guzzling than during the great Christian 
holiday and at the opening of the New Year. 

In San Francisco the official record is that drunkenness 
increased 100 per cent in the past year. Christmas was 
particularly wet, though the enforcement of prohibition 
was earnestly attempted, the Dry zealots being anxious to 
aid their plans for carrying a drastic State enforcement 
act. Not only has drunkenness been increased in San 
Francisco under the Prohibition regime, but the wave of 
crime in other directions has exceeded all records. Yet, 
we were promised by the late Doctor Gaudier that police- 
men and jails under Prohibition would become all but 
useless. They are useless but in the respect that criminal- 
ity overflows all the preventive measures. 

How long will the people of the United States tolerate 



outworn fanaticism which causes the rest of the world to 
eye us in amazement. Remember that our so-called Pro- 
hibition is not a voluntary manifestation by a lot of fanati- 
cal but mistaken people, but is a political activity — prac- 
tically a great graft, which affords professional reformers 
fat salaries. 

Labor is a Commodity Twenty-five women, former em- 
ployes of the California Cotton 
Mills, Oakland, have petitioned the State Industrial Wel- 
fare Commission to allow them to take less than $16 a 
week minimum wages. The spectacle of workers asking 
a State benevolent organization to be permitted to accept 
lower wages, so that they might find honest work, 
is one of the absurdities of the union theory that human 
labor is not a commodity. 

Nothing had been guarded more jealously by labor 
leaders in San Francisco than the theory that labor is a 
sacred thing, outside the economic laws. 

P. H. McCarthy, president of the Building Trades, that 
have done so much to retard the growth of our seaport, 
has been one of its most ardent advocates. When Hearst 
was filling his pressroom with non-union pressmen and 
an arbitration committee was appointed in his interest, 
the president of the Building Trades was one of the experts 
called to prove that labor was not controlled by economic 
law like the great law of supply and demand. "God forbid 
the day will ever come in America when it shall," vocifer- 
ated the philosophic AlcCarthy. 

No doubt the labor leader imagined he was right, for 
laborites get into the habit of mistaking their self-interest 
for benevolence. The)' believe they should enjoy the privi- 
lege of raising wages at will and preventing any effort to 
lower the prevailing scale. Therefore, they angrily reject 
the idea that labor must be viewed as any marketable com- 
modity. 

When labor offers capital a profit it is employed, but 
when labor can not be used with profit to the employer it 
is left idle. 

The case of the cotton mill hands asking to be allowed 
to accept a lower minimum scale by the State Industrial 
Commission sheds abundant light on the problem. At 
$15 a week, the minimum wage tolerated by the State 
Welfare Commission, the women can not find work. At 
$12 a week the mills will employ the idle women. Of 
course, the political commission could not go on record as 
advising the women to prefer idleness and all it may mean, 
to lower wages for the sake of principle, so the manager 
evaded the dilemna by telling them how they could juggle 
the apprentice law and go to work as apprentices. 

But why should an industrial welfare commission have 
authority over cotton mills or any other mills to shut the 
doors against apprentices, and thus be empowered, arti- 
ficially, to regulate wages? By refusing American boys 
apprenticeship in the building trades for years past, a 
scarcity of skilled labor has been created. There is a 
scarcity of houses and enormous profiteering in rents t P. at 
affects the public. 

The labor trust has caused many disarrangements of 
economic laws and has led to the widespread unemploy- 
ment we shall continue to suffer until labor readjustment 
becomes possible under the open shop American Plan. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 14, 1922 



We have too many political commissions under the guise of 
benevolence, tampering with industrial affairs. It is a 
fault of onr political system which allows any hobo to 
participate in municipal and State affairs on an equality 
with the best citizen. Political equality may be justified 
in national elections, but certainly not in municipal, in 
the creation of industrial commissions, the issuance of 
bonds and in local taxation. As well allow every outsider, 
without a dollar invested in a department store, to par- 
ticipate in an annual meeting and dictate to the stock- 
holders how to run the business. Local government is 
first of all cold business — taxation, the best government 
possible for the least money. 



Disadvantage of Being Over-Modest Our Chamber of 

Commerce is do- 
ing- useful service in pointing out that San Francisco leads 
all other cities of the Pacific Coast, by many millions of 
dollars in manufactured commodities. It is not enough for 
us to be ahead of our competitors. We must advertise the 
fact. We must impress it on outsiders who are likely to 
mistake modest silence for conscious inferiority. 

Formerly, when San Francisco was already a great citv 
but Los Angeles was merely a Mexican village with 15,000 
people, it seemed absurd to speak of industrial competition 
with San Francisco on the Pacific Coast. If we had grown 
in the last thirty years like Los Angeles, our present popu- 
lation would be over three millions. Let us not forget that 
significant fact. The closed shop has retarded our growth. 

We still lead all Pacific Coast competitors by a wide mar- 
gin, though some Eastern cities are inclined to regard 
us as of secondary industrial rank, and accept the boastful 
announcements of the growth of Los Angeles as accurate. 
Only by assertions of the real facts can they be impressed 
on strangers. 

Within a week New York newspapers published a table 
to show the proportion of building progress in open-shop 
towns, as compared with building conditions in closed-shop 
cities. At the head of the table was Los Angeles with build- 
ing contracts for the first nine months of 1921, amounting 
to $55,000,000. San Francisco was not mentioned at all in 
the table, either for increase or decrease. Whether the 
tabulator thought that in giving the figures for Los \n- 
geles he furnished all that the public had an interest in. can 
only be guessed. 

No small part of the advance of Los Angeles has been 
made by sounding the loud horn of gratification, every 
time the procession has mined. It may nut be a very 
dignified proceeding, but evidently the world thinks if one 
does not toot his horn the instrument is nut of tune. By 
all means let our energetic Chamber of Commerce not have 
us outdone in the tooting contest. 



Feminists on the Wrong Tack Benning P. Cook tells in 

the "Chronicle" of the 
terrible state of affairs i from the feminist viewpoint) which 
pn lis in Florida, Uabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. In 
all four States a husband owns his wife's services: in all 
four States the authority of the husband as head of the 
family is absolute, whether or not he supports it: in all four 
Slates the father controls the children, can put them to 
work when he pleases, control their education and every 
detail of their upbringing, and alone enjoys their earnings 
In all lour States the husband has the entire choice of 
domicile. 

There are various other counts in the charges the contrib- 



utor to the feminist cause brings out against the South, 
where the tyrant man has the political situation completely 
in hand and is electing none but Democrats. The national 
woman's party, it is alleged, is trying to arouse sentiment 
so that southern women can have full enjoyment of equal 
suffrage, and by changing the political balance kick out 
the tyrants. "We want other sections of the country 
equally blessed as California," declare the suffragists. 

There is no objection to the blessings being spread 
around, but we must confess to some difficulty in finding 
the wonderful blessings in our own State. Our divorce 
record is appalling. The crime wave has compelled the 
United States Government to put armed guards on all the 
postoffices. The contempt of the rising generation for 
the authority of their elders is disheartening. In fact, in 
no respect is there evidence that the universal suffrage has 
actually raised the standard of politics, public morals or 
private life in California. We are apparently not one whit 
better than if woman had been left in the exclusion from 
public life which arouses the ire of the feminists. We have 
attained a higher average of voting strength in California, 
and elections are therefore an added burden on the un- 
fortunate taxpayer. But we have not demonstrated an ad- 
vance in the selection of better officials representative of 
the useful and patriotic class seeking politics with unselfish 
motives. We have not changed governmental mediocrity 
to perfection, as the ardent sisterhood predicted with con- 
fidence. We are in much the same old political rut, only 
spending more money and effort in trying to get out. It 
would be unfair to say that equal suffrage has proven a 
disappointing experiment, but it certainly is not a panacea 
for social and political troubles in California. 

Where has it proven to be a cure-all? In Colorado, 
equal suffrage is a very old story, but Colorado has not 
blazed a new and smooth trail of higher citizenship. It 
has in fact been a backward State — a black spot on the 
feminist map. 

The national woman's party would be wise in its gen- 
eration to leave the South to work out its own political 
evolution. The South is confronted with the great prob- 
lem of assimilating a large proportion of the eleven millions 
of negroes who are constantly increasing. The Southern 
States are sovereign States with equal rights, equal to 
our own. and to have a bunch of Pacific Coast feminists 
threatening the South is like flat-chested, one-lungers from 
the Middle West warning Calif ornians not to drink a 
of their native wine. 

The chief trouble with the national woman's party is 
that it does not truly represent American womanhood. It 
is swayed by propaganda, spread industriously, not by 
women of America, but that part of them who find it profit- 
aide to be professional agitators. If we could only elimi- 
nate from politics the people who raise storms of popular 
dissatisfaction that they may have paying jobs steering the 
Ship of State, things would be easier for the r. 
mankind. 

Hawaiians Disappearing Prince (Cupid) Jonah Kuhio 

Kalanianaola of the royal family 
of the Hawaiian Islands, and for twenty-three years repre- 
sentative of the territory of Hawaii, is dead at his home at 
Waikiki beach. How the native Hawaiian race is dying. 
In one short generation most of the Hawaiian royalties, 
including King Kalakaua have passed. The negro, alone 
of the colored races, makes numerical headway a§ 
white civilization. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Apology From Adminstration 

By HARVEY BROUGHAM 



SENATOR JAMES E. WATSON of Indiana has pub- 
lished a five-column article in the New York "Times," 
descriptive of what the Republicans have accomplished 
in Congress since they came into control of the Govern- 
ment ten months ago. It should really be said that Sen- 
ator Watson's five-column article is more of a party apology 
than a statement of things achieved. He realizes that fact 
himself, for at the outset of his long article he says: "The 
labors of Hercules were small chores compared with the 
task confronting the Republican party when it came into 
control of the Government ten months ago. 

"The Republican national platform of 1920 had wisely 
warned the people not to expect the quick completion of 
the work of national reconstruction. The success of the 
administration in the work of restoration and rehabilitation 
can be measured only by the magnitude of the obstacles 
it was necessary to surmount before a return to national 
normality could be achieved. 

"No administration in all our national history has come 
to power confronted with problems of such complexity and 
difficulty as those which were inherited by President Hard- 
ing and a Republican Congress. Those who declare that 
little has been accomplished speak with small knowledge 
of the facts and little comprehension of the size of the job 
inherited by the Republican party at the end of the Wilson 
era. 

"We had passed through a period of public expenditures 
on a scale that staggers the imagination. In its train was 
left a national debt establishing an interest charge greater 
in itself than the total of our annual national outlay before 
the World War. The public service had become habitu- 
ated during the war era to an extravagance more easily 
established than uprooted. Not only had there been an 
enormous increase in the cost of ordinary civil administra- 
tion through sw-ollen public payrolls, but the public service 
had become thoroughly saturated with the spirit of reck- 
less spending. We had become accustomed to speak of a 
million dollars as we were once wont, in the discussion of 
public expenditure, to talk of a thousand. 

"All about us at the beginning of this administration 
was the wreckage that was the aftermath not only of na- 
tional but of international war conditions. In our own land 
5,000.000 men had been taken from the field of production 
and set at the work of destruction of all values, which is 
the business of war. The world conflict had been over, it 
is true, for two years and four months, but at the instance 
of our own chief executive the completion of peace had 
been delayed for man}-, many months while a world con- 
stitution was being constructed.." 

When an intimate personal, as well as political, friend 
of the President commences a five-column article with 
such a statement of the difficulties of making complete 
changes, it is certain that they have not been made. Had 
Senator Watson belter have left this apology unwritten? 
I 'erhaps not. The public has need of some assurance that 
headway is being made in Washington to extricate the 
Nation from the entangling debris of a great war, in which 
every profiteer pocketed as much as he could grasp. 

Senator Watson sees a silver lining to the clouds in the 
results of the Washington conference. A new era in his- 
tory is opening. "Warren G. Harding is not a lonely or 
a secluded President," remarks Senator Watson. "The 



gates of the White House have been thrown open and 
through them passes day by day in increasing measure 
the good will of the American people to the modest, de- 
voted, yet capable, forceful, wise President. No one hon- 
eatly doubts the earnest desire of Warren G. Harding to 
lead the American people out of the dangers and difficulties 
in which he found them upon his accession, to the broad, 
straight highway of national prosperity and progress, and 
there is a justified increasing confidence in his ability pa- 
tiently but surely to get the Nation 'back to normalcy.' 

"Already there are signs of revival, and when the tax 
bill, lifting some of the loads from the back of business 
enterprise, is followed by a tariff bill written in the inter- 
ests of the American producer, the endless chain of Ameri- 
can prosperity,' reaching from producer to consumer and 
back again, will begin to move. 

"American business is already on the upgrade and the 
present prospect is that by autumn, under the stimulus of 
favoring legislation and administration, the improvement 
will be too pronounced for the American people to think 
of risking a change in the control of government at 
Washington." 

In reference to the possibilities of a change at Washing- 
ton, Senator Watson reveals his party's anxiety about the 
next election of Congressmen. 

It would be insanity for the people to make a change in 
our Government because the present one has not ac- 
complished as much as patriotic citizens would wish. It 
has been impossible. Equally true is it that the Repub- 
licans have not done as much as appeared possible, though 
they have made great reductions in the annual appropria- 
tions. A Republican Congress came into power in March. 
1919, and repealed war appropriations aggregating more 
than $8,000,000,000. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, 
the first under a Republican Congress, appropriations ag- 
gregated $6,495,461,015.37; for the next fiscal year they 
sank to $4,780,829,510.35; and for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1922, our expenditures will be $3,909,282,209.46. 
Congress reduced appropriations asked for by the depart- 
ments of $5,337,996,723.23 by $1,428,714,512.77, and yet, as 
Senator Watson remarks, "many people say this has been 
a do-nothing Congress." 

A reduction of nearly a billion and a half in departmental 
estimates is enormous if measured by (ire-war standards, 
but looks different when measured according to recent 
ideas of public extravagance. 

As to the new tax law, Senator Watson says "it is infin- 
itely better than the present tax law. It will produce $728,- 
900.000 less than the present tax law this year; next year it 
will produce $525,000,000 still less, or a total of $1,100,- 
000,000 less per year than the existing law. Further revi- 
sion of the tax law within the next year is probable." 

Senator Watson complains that "many matters have 
moved slowly during the past ten months because of the 
decline of the sense of party responsibility and party loyalty, 
tempting each ambitious leader to become a leader of his 
own guerilla force rather than an officer in a grand army. 
President Harding has pointed out the necessity of better 
co-ordination, more subordination, among the representa- 
tives of Republicanism at Washington. The gently exer- 
cised authority of President Harding as party leader is 
growing. In all this are signs of hope for Republican 
achievement at Washington in 1922." 



There's a law against picketing, but still it goes on 

day after day in the same spot, with cops walking by at- 
tending to their duty. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 14, 1922 



Hypocrisy Sweeping Country 

By JAMES W. WADSWORTH, Jr. 
United Stales Senator From New York 



THERE are many difficult features of the so-called pro- 
hibition situation, but, in my view, none more deplor- 
able than the hypocrisy that is sweeping the country. 
Large numbers of highly respectable citizens, persons of 
excellent standing in their communities, smile at the viola- 
tion of law and the Constitution, and apparently have no 
intention of assisting in the enforcement of the prohibition 
law. 

It stands to reason that this situation has a very damag- 
ing effect upon public sentiment and upon the conduct of 
government generally. And when sober-minded and law- 
abiding people contemplate this situation they can not but 
look with pity, to express it mildly, upon lawmakers who 
enact laws to be laughed at by the people. 

It is a situation that affects adversely all enforcement. 
In the desperate attempts made by Government authorities 
to enforce the law there is always the danger that the 
agents charged with the enforcement will resort to ex- 
tremes which are unjustifiable and contrary to our Ameri- 
can conception of the security of person and property. 
When this occurs something a great deal worse than ridi- 
cule is the result, namely, popular resentment and even 
counter measures which are as dangerous as the extremes 
sometimes resorted to by those who represent the Govern- 
ment. 

We could have accomplished the needed reform in the 
liquor problem by steps carefully thought out, and by test- 
ing each step as we went along. But we did not do that 
and now we are in a deplorable situation. 

I have even heard the suggestion made that the prohi- 
bition enforcement agencies would not frown upon a prac- 
tice that involves the use of anonymous communications 
as a means of obtaining evidence of violations of the pro- 
hibition laws. The suggestion is to send cards to the 
authorities conveying the information that this or that 
person may have a quantity, large or small, of alci 
liquor in his or Iter possession, the cards to be unsigned. 

The organization which it is said sponsors this proposi- 
tion will, we are told, invite citizens to engage in this sort 
of espionage upon their neighbors. I hesitate to comment 
upon this proposition except to say that a law which re- 
sults in one portion of the population spying upon the other 
portion is of very doubtful value. 

Let us consider the law that was recently passed and 
which attempts to provide how much Spiritous or vinous 
liquor a physician may prescribe to patients. For tht 
gress to set up its judgment on medical matters as against 
thai of the medical profession seems to me to be going 
pretty far. To my mind, it is an invitation for reputable 
physicians to violate the law and the Constitution, when 
Congress proceeds to deny to a reputable physician the 
right to prescribe what he thinks is necessary for the safety 
and the health of his patient. It seems to me that the new 
law elaborates the restrictions which are to be placed upon 
the medical profession, and makes it almost impossible, if 
the physician is to obey the law. for him to use any discre- 
tion. 

This fanaticism has gone just about far enough. It seems 
to me that the time has come when we should gatht 
wits together and resume our sense of proportion. The 
thing every patriotic citizen in this country hopes for most 
is that the Constitution of the United States shall be re- 



spected and that the laws shall be obeyed ; but when 
Congress crowds upon the people and crowds upon a pro 
fession as high in its ideals as the medical profession re- 
trictions of this kind, how can you expect respect For the 
law and the Constitution? 

For two years now the country has endeavored to adjust 
itself to the new conditions prescribed under the Eighteenth 
Amendment. Every person knows that while it has been 
enforcible in some communities, in many other communi- 
ties it has given rise to an orgy of law evasion. It is a very 
difficult problem that we have undertaken. Thousands of 
persons give lip service to the law and violate it on the sly. 
I do not want to see that spirit increased. There is too 
much of it already. 

We had better approach this problem in the future with 
more tolerance and human understanding. Otherwise our 
difficulties will increase. 



MEXICO DESIRES FRIENDLY RELATIONS 



That the attitude of the Obregon Government toward 
the United States is being grossly misrepresented, is the 
assertion of Gumaro Villalobos, Mexican Consul General in 
New York City and the leading consular representative of 
his Government in this country. His views are indorsed 
by San Francisco Mexicans who have business relations 
with the Obregon Government. Mexico desires friendly 
relations with all nations, hut particularly with the United 
States, according to Mr. Villalobos, who feels that the anti- 
Obregon propaganda is inspired by those hoping to gain 
through delaying the recognition of the Republic of Mexico 
b) I 'resilient Harding. 

"The plain truth is," says business men here in touch with 
Mexico, "that the Southern Republic is struggling to regain 
her feet after a decade of trouble, is anxious to cement 
friendly relations with all the nations of the world and par- 
ticularly with her great neighbor to the north. The ( )bre- 
gon Government fully realizes and understands that the 
prosperity and progress of Mexico is irrevocably linked with 
that of the United States, and there is no delusion to the 
contrary." 

AUSTRALIAN LABOR AIMS 



The Australian Labor Party, in its new Federal constitu- 
tion, takes the stand that compulsory naval and military 
service should be abolished, that no ft ices should be raised 
to serve outside Australia, and that the State should take no 
part in overseas wars excepl by decision of the pei 

The party includes in its aims passage of legislation to 
protect Australian shipping against unfair competition. 



EUROPE 'S FAMOUS WONDER dl.ASS^ 
A MARVELOUS NEW INVENTION 

The "Binoculette" 







\ t oMBINFD OPERA ind FIEIH Gl ASS Can be carried In a man's 
vest pocket or lady's purse and weich*onl\ 2 ounce*. I vr a Indoors 
i'. Reiular Price M5.»» 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Optical Kupc-rt and Importers of Optical Specialties 

Ti Years in San Fraociaco 

960 M.rk.l Street between Mason and Taylor St».»ta 



TROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




mm 



'tkn&Cna-* too ti*'<kv3 ati (foil' 

Ooc &*i will pLy Ux <kiil.sk, wilipn. 



PUBLIC MONEY POCKETED 



Why has not the city and county attorney taken some 
more active steps to get the $40,000 out of Samuel G. Mur- 
phy's pockets and into improvements for Golden Gate 
park, for which the money was donated by the late Honora 
Sharpe, it is alleged. That the money was left by the 
benevolent widow for park improvements is a record not 
to be questioned. That $40,000 of her bequest has not 
been used as she intended, is also certain. The city and 
county attorney has been years on the hunt for the widow's 
bequest, but he is no nearer to recovering it than he was 
five years ago, when the Golden Gate park commission 
notified him to take some legal action in the matter. Per- 
haps it is beyond the power of the city and county attorney 
to recover the retarded bequest by court procedure. If so, 
the matter should be brought before the great court of 
public opinion and let that tribunal have its say. The 
public is entitled to know all the facts. W 'hat effort has 
the city and county attorney made to have all the facts 
placed before the public? 

The $40,000 which should have gone into a park gate- 
way, but has not. belonged to the public if the allegations 
be correct. Did the late Honora Sharpe intend that her 
bequest should go into the pockets of an individual instead 
of being expended on a public work she desired? The 
matter should long ago have been threshed out by the city 
and county attorney's office, but neither the incumbent 
nor his predecessor seems to have done his full duty. 

# * * 

Honora Sharpe was the widow of a leading lawyer and 
left a considerable sum for park improvements. Under 
our California law of bequests, only a certain proportion of 
estates can be willed away from natural heirs and given 
in charity or for patriotic uses. To avoid possible legal 
entanglements, Honora Sharpe's bequest to Golden Gate 
park was covered by a deed of trust, Park Commissioner 
Adolph Spreckels being one of the trustees and Samuel G. 
Murphy, a former banker, the other. Mr. Spreckels 
promptly discharged his duty as a trustee and the money 
in his trust has long since gone into the park funds. Mr. 
Murphy has not paid over to the public the share of the 
widow's bequest and it has been claimed by the city and 
county attorney's office that he has left the State and be- 
come a resident of New York. Correspondence, it is said. 
seems to have no effect in extricating the trust money from 
the banker's pockets. * * * 

Now on the face of it, this diversion of the Widow 
Sharpe's trust fund, left for park improvements, demands 
full publicity and tireless effort of the city and county at- 
torney's office to protect the citizens who have been injured 
— for injury it is to have $40,000 donated for a park gate- 
way retained by one of the trustees. The park commission 
as a body is blameless in the affair. Their secretary has 
many times been ordered to demand an accounting of the 
$40,000 by Mr. Murphy, and in despair the dunning task 
had been transferred to the city and county attorney's 

office. The latter is really the official culprit. 

* * * 

Former Banker Murphy must have some reason to offer 



why he holds the Honora Sharpe money out of the public 
funds. It seems impossible that his excuse can be valid, 
so often has the request been made by the park commission 
that he pay up. It seems to be a case where the force of 
public opinion will have to be exerted to atone for the 
seeming neglect of the city's lackadaisical legal department. 



* * * 



It is not the first time that bequests intended for public 
institutions in San Francisco have stuck to the pockets of 
trustees of high social standing. A whole block of land 
left by a noted surgeon for the benefit of a medical college 
passed into the possession of a fashionable doctor who was 
made the trustee to avoid the law against large charities. 
San Francisco is getting too far away from the moral 
vagaries of mining camp days to continue such lapses. At 
least, our official legal department should express condem- 
nation of them. 

IRELAND'S PROBLEM 



It would be unfair to anticipate that the Irish leaders 
will engage in internecine strife because the De Valera 
"die-hard" faction came so near to success. If the large 
majority of the industrious people of Ireland could have 
their way there would be nothing but peace in their island. 
But it is not an easy matter for any people to assert them- 
selves over their politicians. The Irish farmers and rep- 
resentative business people have understood for some years 
that they have had few complaints on the score of good 
land laws. The income tax in Ireland is the lowest in the 
world. The farmers and business people have been put- 
ting money in the savings banks. 

Xow Ireland is a free state in obedience to a patriotic 
desire of the younger generation. The earnest, patriotic 
aspirations of any people are to be respected. Sentimentally, 
Ireland lias achieved a great victory. 

In the matter of material advantage, it remains to be 
seen how her attainment of free statehood will benefit 
Ireland. Her future is, however, in her own hands. She 
will have new financial responsibilities and serious prob- 
lems inseparable from any government. Will she escape 
heavier taxation, the great question of the age? 

Above all people the Irish should know that internal 
war is calamitous. It was the quarrels of her native kings 
that made her a subject nation. In 1170 Dermot, the king 
of Eastern Ireland, who had been driven from his throne, 
induced Normans, under Richard de Clare I Earl Strong- 
bow), to aid him. It proved easier to introduce the Nor- 
mans than to get them out of Ireland. 

Will the new rulers of Ireland be self-seeking politicians 
or the conservative citizens desirous of peace and pros- 
perity? Taxation will be their chief problem. 



J. M. Kepner, the successor of Supervisor Rossi as 

president of the Downtown Association, is a real estate 
man connected with Madison & Burke and well regarded in 
his business. The directory of the association now stands: 
Horace II. Allen. Frank E. Carroll, D. G. Davis, Tom Dil- 
lon. W. D. Fennimore. Marshal Hale, Frank AY. Marston, 
Andrew W. Merritt, Frederic S. Nelson, James A. Soren- 
son, Max Summer. Frank I. Turner and Frederick A. 

Wilson. 

President Dohrmann of the newly-elected School 

Hoard, on assuming office this week, expressed the inten- 
tion of making haste slowly in school matters. The Board, 
he said, was a non-partisan, non-sectarian and non-opinioned 
body working for the best interests of the schools. We all 
hope so. We shall see, and meantime wish it success. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 14, 1922 



Our War Debts a Dream 



The creation of an economic conference to reach some 
beneficial solution of the European war debts, like the 
famous ghost of Banquo, will not down. All the states- 
men in all the capitals are talking about it, but not for pub- 
lication. But the open diplomacy is certain to have full 
airing soon. 

During the Washington conference, Wells, the English- 
man wrote to his British newspapers that while abandon- 
ment of war debts was on everybody's lips nobody dared 
to give it tongue. The British editors concluded that Pres- 
ident Harding was not ready to call an economic council to 
follow the disarmament conference and the preliminary 
steps would have to be taken in Europe. 

The popular idea in America, according to Wells, was 
that payment of the foreign debts should be insisted upon. 
Great Britain should begin by showing her willingness to 
pay part of the foreign debt, if she wished for favorable re- 
ception of a proposition to cancel all war debts. 

There is no longer any doubt that Lloyd George has 
made up his mind to give Europe the lead in that move. 
British newspapers declare that Great Britain is ready to 
pay in the only way payment can be made, in British goods. 
But with millions of Americans unemployed we want no 
more foreign imports that may add to the army of our idle 
workers. Another and more serious task than he has so far 
essayed is therefore facing the British Premier. It is ap- 
parently obviously up to him to convince America and 
France that Europe is bankrupt and the least said about it 
the better. The ofifer of the British to pay us in goods is 
merely a gesture — pantomime, which means little or noth- 
ing. Altogether we have lent to the Allies over ten billions 
of dollars and the British share of the indebtedness is over 
four billions. If Britain can in >t find the money to cancel 
our claim against her, what of the others with empty 
pockets? Belgium nearly four hundred millions; Italy over 
a billion and a half; Russia over one hundred and ninety-two 
millions; Greece fifteen millions; France nearly four bil- 
lions; and then all the small fry, Czechoslovakia, Finland, 
Armenia, Rumania and many others. Their empty treas- 
uries are like a house of cards. If one be withdrawn the 
whole edifice tumbles. Britain is the only prop of the 
European bankrupts. France leans on the glimmering hope 
of extracting every cent of reparations from Germany, ami 

if the defeated empire should give up the financial ghost, 
the while world would go to sma^h in its banking relations. 

It is a condition calculated to give financiers headaches, 
and naturally leads outspoken European editors to talk of 
payment of war debts as airy dreams. "The legend of our 
war indebtedness." is how they refer to the madn. 
expending oceans of blood and money as long as Uncle Sam 
supplied the cash on notes that can never be paid. It is a 
fine object lesson on the lunacy of war in general and par- 
ticularly for a great democracy like ours. 

If France can be made to realize that I ierman reparation 
according to the Versailles treaty is an impossibility, which 
if attempted would wreck the financial and industrial 
world. Lloyd George's task of cancelling all war debts will 
be less strenuous. The white man's world will begin a new- 
chapter with the books capable i'i balancing. America is so 
rich naturally that she can stand the loss of ten billions. 
She will have experience instead of her cash. How she will 
take the awakening to the fact that she has been made to 
pull the chestnuts out of the fire, remains to be seen. 




A Most Interesting Trip 
to the East 

is over the 

Sunset Route 

—through Los Angeles, Tucson, 
El Paso, San Antonio, Houston, 
and New Orleans. 

TWO DAILY TRAINS FROM SAN FRANCISCO 

(Third Street Station) 

"Sunset Limited" Lv. 5:00p. m. 

Ar. New Orleans 7 :3S p. m. (3d Day) 
"Sunset Express" Lv. 8:15 p.m. 

Ar. New < Means 6 :2S p. m. < ith 

CONNECTING 
WITH SOUTHERN PACIFIC OCEAN STEAMERS 

sailing w.'.uu i.. New York; also win. 
t i Noi ih and Baal 



trains 



Rail and Steamer fare same as All-Rail, bill Includes 
berths on Bteamers, "100 Golden Houi 

On your way — see the 

Apache Trail of Arizona 

By auto through the heart of "Apache Land" — a mate 
canyons, peaks and cliffs aglow tvith bright colors 

— 120 miles of scenic splendor. .1 one-day side trip 
or detour. 

DETOUR FROM MARICOPA 1 hr !>;,,„ 

•o ' OR SIDE TRIP FROM BOWIE VIA 

GLOBE to Roosevelt Dam ana return 

Deti 530.00. 

You can stop off at El Paso and go by street car into 
l )ld Mexico; or you can stop at Xew ( Means and 
visit many historic places. Mardi <,ras festivities 
January 6th to February 28th. 

For Railroad and Pullman Fares Ask Agents 

50 Post St. Ferry Station Third St. Station 

or Phone Sutter 4000 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Defending Kitchener's Fame 



VISCOUNT ESHER'S attack upon Lord Kitchen- 
er's administration of the British war office from 
August, 1914, until he sailed away to his death 
in the northern seas on the "Hampshire" in June, 1916, 
has provoked a spirited reply from Lieut.-Gen. Sir 
Henry M. Lawson, a soldier of distinction in the 
Egyptian and South African campaigns. Viscount 
Esher, in his book, "The Tragedy of Lord Kitchener," 
an unfortunate title because it is misleading, tries to 
make out a case against the secretary of state for war, 
and declares that Lord Kitchener realized that he had 
been cast for the wrong part. 

Before Gen. Sir Henry M. Lawson entered the lists 
to defend the remarkable man under whom he had 
served and of whose career he had made a study, 
others had questioned the impartiality and soundness 
of Viscount Esher's verdict. To the great majority 
of his countrymen, the minority being composed of 
politicians, enemies in the army and certain journalists 
and their readers who were dissatisfied with the course 
of the war, sincerely no doubt, Lord Kitchener was 
"the great outstanding and commanding figure," who, 
despite admitted mistakes and temperamental peculi- 
arities, did more to baffle and defeat the enemy than 
any other Englishman. Field Marshal Haig has said: 
"Who can doubt that but for this man and his work- 
Germany would have been victorious?" Also, "Per- 
haps the victory would have come to us sooner had 
he been with us to the end." 

In an article in the October "Nineteenth Century" 
General Lawson points out that Viscount Esher was 
a member of the committee of imperial defense, 
"which was responsible for working out that war pol- 
icv that Lord Kitchener ultimately overturned. For 
one so placed it was difficult to discern even-handed 
justice as regards Lord Kitchener and to give their 
full weight to criticisms which involved not only his 
friends, but himself." The war policy of the commit- 
tee of imperial defense had not looked beyond aiding 
France in an emergency affecting the empire's inter- 
ests with an army of more than seven divisions and 
perhaps reinforcements of two divisions, the Terri- 
torials to take over the defense of the United Kingdom. 
When Lord Kitchener assumed charge of the war of- 
fice in August, 1914, he advocated, without a moment's 
delay, abandonment of the policy of limited liability, 
foreseeing a long and desperate war, and he proposed 
to raise an army of several millions of men. A few 
days before he sailed upon the "Hampshire," never to 
be seen again by his countrymen, he said in the Mouse 
of Commons : 

"Such an idea was contrary to the theories of all 
European soldiers. Armies, it had long been argued, 
could be expanded within limits but could not be cre- 
ated in time of war. I felt myself that, though there 
might be some justice in this view, I had to take risks 
and embark upon what might be regarded as a gi- 
gantic experiment." 

As Germany's war machine seemed irresistible at 
the time and the defensive campaign in France might 
soon end in disaster, Lord Kitchener's plans were re- 
garded as impracticable and fantastic. One distin- 
guished soldier after another reasoned with him and 
said that the thing was impossible. "Here, indeed," 



says General Lawson, "was a situation to test the 
courage and vigor which inspired purpose and fixed 
determination, qualities that Lord Esher would have 
us believe he had left behind him in the deserts of the 
Sudan." Lord Kitchener's achievements from 1898, 
when he was "the rush which had sprung up so mirac- 
ulously in the sands of the desert," (according to 
Lord Esher), until the outbreak of the Great War, 
are reviewed by General Lawson to prove that the 
victor of Omdurman grew in mental stature with every 
task given him. A taciturn, self-centered, lonely man, 
he never lacked for enemies. When he succeeded 
Lord Roberts in the South African War there were 
men who thought that the job would be too big for 
him. "He does not know, he is ignorant of the Brit- 
ish army," they said. He not only subdued the Boers 
with his system of blockhouses, but made "a peace 
on the basis of mutual agreement which he believed 
would serve to form an indissoluble bond." And 
Kitchener was right. As commander-in-chief in India 
he observed conditions for a year, and reorganized the 
army on modern lines, greatly improving the military 
position of the country. Several years of vigorous 
and successful administration in Egypt followed. Too 
soon came the Great War. Writing to Lord French 
on August 27, 1914, Kitchener said: "Had I been 
consulted on military matters during the last three 
years I would have done everything in my power to 
prevent the present state of things in which the coun- 
try finds itself." 

Lord Kitchener was vehemently assailed for a lack 
of the right ammunition in France early in the war. 
General Lawson believes that "history will record" 
that the attack was absolutely undeserved. At the 
time Kitchener was planning for machine guns and 
ammunition "for the new armies when they came into 
being." His defender maintains that no soldier of 
ability and foresight could have worked harmoniously 
with a cabinet of twenty-three members. lie criticises 
the soldier turned cabinet minister for not calling a 
halt upon "length}- and barren discussions on purely 
military matters." which only retarded progress. Of 
Lord Esher's case General Lawson says, finally: "In 
the absence of more authoritative testimony the writer 
prefers to hold to what is known as against the un- 
examined impressions of men swayed by many mo- 
tives, as against, in fact, what may be termed cabinet 
and societv gossip." 



The Volstead enforcers are going through the 
motions of fining prohibition violators in Judge 
Dooling's court. But there is no waste motion in the 
way the thousands of bootleggers are cording up their 
profits from poisoning the public. 



An independent oil company may be defined as one 
that always raises its price of gasoline to the consumer 
the same dav the Standard does. 



As the world grows more and more civilized, we 
keep right on improving padlocks. 



There even is the possibility war may reach a stage 
where you can say it with flowers. 



Not until the nations stack their arms will the tax- 
payers be able to stack their dollars. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 14, 1922 



11 



Australia Rejoices 



-IJ-^— M^— Hll^— l„l. 



The agreement reached in Washington between the 
great powers has been the cause of great rejoicing in Aus- 
tralia, for there a guarantee of peace between the white race 
and the yellow race is a subject of real concern. We talk 
in America of possible war with Japan, but it is with as 
little immediate concern as if we talked of war with the 
planet Mars. The subject belongs to the sphere of abstract 
speculation. 

To Australia, however, the yellow invader is a living 
menace for Asia is only "across the way," and not long ago 
the Japanese spoke quite resentfully of being excluded from 
settlement by the Australians. "You have been several hun- 
dred years settling Australia, and have only about 4,000,- 
000 white inhabitants, after all your efforts. The white 
man is practically a failure in Australia. Why don't you let 
us in and we shall show you what settlement really means?" 
said the Japanese. And no doubt they would. That was 
the tone of the Japanese discussion before the World War 
and the Anglo-Japanese alliance in which Japan undertook 
to look after British interests in Asia while the British 
looked after the Japanese interests in Europe, as against 
Germany. 

But Australia is committed to the principle of a "White 
Australia" and has resisted all the efforts of labor specula- 
tors to admit the yellow race on terms of anything like 
equality. Today Australia is as much a white man's land 
as ever, though the labor governments that have dominated 
it have not been signally successful in planting a large 
white population on the vast country. 

The pact signed at Washington is full of genuine interest 
to White Australia for it guarantees the distant colony a 
decade of life, which would be sorely jeopardized under 
conditions where the white race struggled for existence 
against the teeming millions of Asia, and the British Em- 
pire stood aloof from America and France in the struggle. 

The Prime Minister of Australia at Melbourne calls the 
news of the Washington pact as "magnificent tiding-.." 

"The treaty," he said, "is a magnificent achievement. It 
does what by common consent the Parliament of the 
monwealth desired. By virtue of its provisions Australia 
and the Empire will generally continue that alliance with 
Japan which has existed so many years and for which is 
substituted one on a broader and more enduring basis. \s 
the first great step to an alliance of the branches of the 
Anglo-Saxon race. Australia hails it with great satisfaction. 
(hit of the Washington Conference has come a great thing. 
and the whole world rejoices. Whilst the news will he wel- 
comed in all countries, to Australia it is a message of spe- 
cial significance. It ensures our security, for it guarantees 
peace and harmonj in the Pacific." 



Formerly, when the slogan of "Turn the rascals out'' in- 
spired dissatisfied voters, 90 per cent of the registered vote 
was actually cast. At the election of President Cleveland, 
"8 per cent of the registered vote was cast in San Francisco. 
At the election of President Garfield 96 per cent was the 
\ecord. President Harrison got 96 per cent. Never did 
tual vote fall below 94 per cent on important offices. 
Mayors could not be elected on less than 90 per cent of 
the registered vote. Now. they get into office on less than 
70 per cent, and important bond elections involving millions 
are carried on 51 per cent. The average in eleven bond 
elections was below 4o per cent. 



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you get more miles to the 
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Both time and money are 
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3 



12 




Busy Cupid 

THE marriage of Mrs. Marie Louise de 
Guigne to Paul Thayer Iaccaci took place 
in New York on Saturday, and the 
news came as a surprise to society. The bride 
has been in New Vork with her mother, Mrs. 
William Delaware Nielson. most of the 
winter. She is one the prettiest and most 
popular young women of Burlingame society 
and is a granddaughter of the late Senator 
Felton of Menlo Park, one of the early-day 
millionaires of California. Her brother is 
Felton Elkins. who has also spent the greater 
part of the winter in New Vork. Their 
father was the late William Elkins of Phila- 
delphia, a member of the Elkins family of 
West Virginia. Mr. Iaccaci is a New Yorker 
of Italian descent. The couple will pass their 
honeymoon in Europe and will return to New 
York to live. 

Announcement is being made in the North 

of the engagement of Miss Dorothy Alex- 
ander, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. F. 
Alexander of Tacoma, to Joseph L. Carman, 
Jr.. son of the Joseph Carmans of Tacoma. 
The wedding, which will unite two of the 
most prominent families in the North, will 
take place in July. Young Carman is a senior 
at Yale and is a member of the varsity crew. 
H. F. Alexander is the president of the Pa- 
cific Steamship Company. 

Miss Avis Hughes, daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. Rupert Hughes, was married in New 
York on Sunday to John M. Saunders of 
Seattle. The wedding took place at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. George Creel. Mrs. Creel 
is Blanche Bates, the San Francisco actress. 
The bride's only attendant was Miss Eliza- 
beth Cobb, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin 
Cobb, and the best man was Churchill Peters. 
The bride has spent much of the past two 
vears in California with her parents. 

Mrs. May B. Cosby of Los Angeles and 

Colonel Lewi's S. Chappelear will be married 
at Riverside on January 20th, and after a 
honeymoon in Southern California will -ail 



OPPORTUNITY 

Eighty Acres and Improvements 

IT nestles upon the brink of a Yo- 
semite in miniature, whose water- 
falls and shadows turn summer into 
spring. The sunsets here are not less 
gorgeous than those of Southern Italy 
and winds and fogs are things almost 
unknown, a place of rarest beauty in 
a scenic wonderland, unrivaled even 
in the Swiss Alps. 

The autumn colors are like those of 
New England and snow-scenes In the dis- 
tarce make winter enchanting. In its 
sunken garden giant woodwardias mingle 
with sweet-scented shrubs and wild grape 
vines droop from the sycamore trees. 

If you have dreamed of things almost 
beyond belief, of living under the spell of 
grandeur indescribable, of being lulled to 
Eleep by the murmur of waterfalls all 
your own, of a home where the longest 
summer day will be too brief, here is ful- 
fillment. 

Northerly from San Francisco and an 
easy journey. The owner will give details 
in person. Bereavement has altered his 
plans and given this opportunity to you. 
Box 18, News Letter office, Russ bldg. 



for the Philippines on February 7th to be 
away two years or so.. Announcement of the 
engagement, which was made coincident with 
announcement of the wedding date, created a 
pleasant stir of surprise at a tea which Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Woods Martindale gave at 
their home on Sunday afternoon. 

Balls 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cowan Jackling 

will give a ball on Friday evening, February 
3rd, in honor of their niece, Miss Eleanor 
Spreckels, debutante daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, and Miss Mary 
Martin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. 
Martin. Miss Spreckels and Miss Martin 
have made their debut this winter. The ball 
will have for its setting the Colonial and 
Italian rooms at the Hotel St. Francis. 

Edward Greenway, who will lead the 

cotillion at the ball Miss Jennie Blair will 
give for Miss Helene de Latour on January 
20th. will coach the debutantes and their 
partners of the first set. 

Queen Scheherezade is to be chosen by 

vote for the Mardi Gras to be held Febru- 
ary 28th, the idea of a popular queen meet- 
ing with the plan to make the annual Mardi 
Gras a ball for all San Francisco rather than 
for the coterie generally included in the 
number known as "society." The committee 
of women comprising the auxiliary of the 
Children's hospital, in whose behalf this ball 
has been held for years, hope to make San 
Francisco's annual carnival ball just what 
the Mardi Gras is to New Orleans — a pa- 
geant carnival that will bring together all the 
social elements that believe that joy. laugh- 
ter and gayety have a real place in the 
scheme of things. Mrs. Augustus Taylor. 
president of the auxiliary of the Children's 
hospital, has elaborate plans about making 
this ball one of surpassing loveliness. 

Dinner Dance 

Complimenting their granddaughter, 

Miss Edna Taylor, a debutante of this win- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Hopkins en- 
tertained at a handsomely appointed dinner- 
dance Tuesday evening in the rose room 
bowl of the Palace hotel. The party was 
attended by above two score guests. 

Mrs. Marcus Stone was hostess at a 

delightful dinner-dance on Saturday evening 
in the Venetian room at the Fairmont, her 
honor guest being Miss Frances Baruch, 

Dinners 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Pierce Madison 

will entertain at dinner at their, home on 
Jackson street on Saturday evening, and 
later the party will attend the benefit con- 
cert to be given by Ruth St. Denis and tht 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra at the 
Civic Auditorium for the milk fund of the 
Associated Charities. 

Mrs. Ward Dwight will be hostess at a 

musicale and tea at her home February 17th. 
and in the evening there will be a dinner and 
dancing for the women of the receiving 
party and those contributing to the pro- 
gram. 

Mrs. William J. Younger gave a dinner 

Wednesday evening at her home in Jackson 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



street for Mr. and Mrs. Will Irwin, who are 
here for part of the winter. The other 
guests were Mr. and Mrs. William Denman. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilcox, Miss Frances Jol- 
liffe and Mr. and Mrs. John Rosseter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCreery are en- 
tertaining the debutantes and their escorts 
at dinner at their home in Burlingame on 
Saturday evening, and later the party will 
attend the ball to be given at the Henry T. 
Scott home in Burlingame, for Miss Mary 
Martin, granddaughter of the hosts. Miss 
Martin will be the complimented guest at 
the McCreery dinner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Clark Jr. will 

give a dinner Saturday evening at their 
home in Burlingame and later take their 
guests to the ball which Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry T. Scott will give for their grand- 
daughter, Miss Mary Martin. 
Miss Frances Lent gave a dinner Tues- 
day evening for Mrs. Hamilton Corbett of 
Portland, Ore., who is visiting Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Fagan. Mrs. Corbett was Miss Harriet 
Cummings of Portland. 

Bridge Teas 

Mrs. George Ebright assembled a group 

of her young friends Tuesday afternoon for 
a bridge party and later a number of others 
dropped in for tea. 

Miss Helen Perkins and Miss Kathryn 

Masten, who are sailing this month for Hono- 
lulu for a visit of several months, were 
nf honor at a bridge tea which Miss Margaret 
Buckbee gave Tuesday afternoon. 

Miss Kathryn Masten was guest of honor 

at an informal bridge party given Monday- 
afternoon by Miss Marian and Miss Margery 
Dunne. 

Miss Claire Stringer, who returned from 

a long stay in the East, greeted her friends 
recently at a bridge tea at her home. 

Miss Mary Emma Flood extended the 

hospitality of her home to a group of the 
Junior League members Wednesday afternoon 
at an informal tea. The party was attended 
by all. nit thirty of the young matrons and 
girls and following the business discussion in 
connection with the cabaret entertainment at 
the Fairmont on the nights of January 26th. 
27th and 28th. tea was served. Miss Flood 
is president of the Junior League. 

The Green street residence of Mr. and 

Mrs. Ghirardelli was the scene of a happy 
gathering Sunday afternoon, when their 
small daughter was christened, receiving the 
name of Clarissc Marie, after her mother, 




ii O" 



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CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 14, 1922 



who was the former Miss Clarisse Lohse. 
Following the baptism, an informal reception 
was held and tea was served, the guests in- 
cluding the relatives and a few of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ghirardelli's closer friends. 
Luncheons 

Mr. and Mrs. Cyril R. Tobin assembled 

a few friends at luncheon at the San Mateo 
Polo Club on Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. Julian Thorne entertained a few 

friends informally at luncheon in the Fable 
room at the Hotel St. Francis Monday, and 
among them were Mrs. Charles R. McCor- 
mick, Mrs. Walter Hobart, Mrs. Frederick 
Hussey, Mrs. Athol McBean and Miss Marian 
Zeile. 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Cameron were 

hosts at luncheon at the Burlingame Country 
Club on Sunday, complimenting Lady Henry 
of London, who took her departure for Los 
Angeles Tuesday after a brief visit in San 
Francisco. 

Mrs. Charles John Behlow, Jr., was 

hostess at a delightful luncheon and bridge 
party given in the Empire room at the Fair- 
mont on Saturday, her honor guest being 
Mrs. Zada Falangus, whose marriage to 
Joseph Hunt took place the latter part of the 
month. After luncheon the balance of the 
afternoon was devoted to cards. 
In Town and Out 

Mrs. Mary Ashe Miller returned home 

last week, having enjoyed the holiday sea- 
son in Santa Barbara, where she was the 
guest of Miss Cornelia Kempff. 

Mrs. Horace Davis Pillsbury and Miss 

Peggy Pillsbury left New Jersey on their 
way to their home in California. They passed 
the last few days of their sojourn on the 
Atlantic Coast at Edgewood with Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred de Ropp Jr., returning with 
them to their home after the Christmas 
gathering of the Taylor family at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. John Taylor in Boston. 
Mrs. Pillsbury and Miss Peggy will be in 
San Francisco for several weeks, and in the 
spring they will return to Montecito, where 
they will take possession of their country 
place. 

Jeffrey Armsby left Monday for the At- 
lantic Coast, where he is pursuing his 
studies. 

James Flood Jr., who has been with his 

parents at their home in Broadway street, 
left for the Ojai valley, where be is attend- 
ing school. 



IT'S "COLONIAL" NOW 

Ej eg! do other 

■ 1 1 [es .1 nd i he new "Colonial" rl 
tenses e re dlsplai Ing the conapl 
frames and eyeglasses, "Colonial*' 
are dlstinci h e and attrai tii e In appear- 
ance and scientifically correct — made for 
those who demand the utmost In style, 
comforl and efficiency. 



W . D. Fcnnim.irv 



« Davis 



A. R. Ftnnimon 




. c . (181 Post Street 

San Francisco ... j 2m m$ion S(ree , 

Oakland 1221 Broadway 

Berkeley 2106 Sbatluck Avenue 



Mrs. Hamilton Corbett of Portland is 

passing the winter in San Francisco and is 
a guest at the Fairmont. 

Mrs. John Owen Miller has returned to 

Santa Monica after a visit in Maricopa with 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Miller and her grand- 
children. 

After a delightful visit in San Francisco, 

where she passed the holidays with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Harrison, 
Mrs. Van Lee Kirkman has returned to her 
home in the South. She left Sunday for 
Coronado. 

Miss Lawton Filer, daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. Walter G. Filer, will return on Friday, 
after a fortnight's visit in the East. 

Miss Nancy Davis, daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. Norn's K. Davis, who now make their 
home in Santa Barbara, is visiting Miss 
Eleanor Simpson at the Simpson home in 
Burlingame. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. Davis have 

come to town from their ranch in San Be- 
nito county and are at the Fairmont for the 
winter. 

Edward D. Beylard and Miss Sophie 

Beylard, who have been in Europe, are en 
route home and will arrive within a fort- 
night. 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope and their 

daughter, Mrs. Moseley Taylor of Boston, 
will arrive from the East during the last 
of this week. Mrs. Pope has been East 
since the late autumn. 

Clarence Follis is here from New York 

visiting his sister Mrs. Frank W. Griffin, and 
Mr. Griffin. 

A number of people were at the ferry 

Monday to say good-by to relatives anil 
friends. Mrs. Chilion Heword, who has 
been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Janus Potter Langhorne, left for her home in 
Montreal. 

Charles W. Clark returned Monday to bis 

home in San Mateo from New Orleans, where 
be entered some of his horses in the races. 
Lady Henry of London arrived on Sun- 
day for a short stay. She was the principal 
guest at a luncheon given Monday by Mrs. 
Daniel C. Jackling at her apartment at the 
St. Francis, 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. Davis of Santa 

Cruz have been greeting their many friends 
in the city and are located at the Fairmont. 
Intimations 
Mrs. Pio llbcrta Morbio, her daughter. 
Miss Alberta Morbio, and Mis- Estelle Nolan 
are leaving in February for a tour of Europe 
and the Far East 

[iss Edith Bull, who went abroad last 
year with Mrs. Ella Hotaling and remained in 
Europe after Mrs. Hotaling returned home, 
il'lished in Paris t"r the remainder of 
the winter. She ha- no plans for returning 
and expects to stay in France 
indefinitely. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Stimson and Mrs. 

Sthnson of Seattle, who have been 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Stimson at their 
home at the Fairmont hotel tor the past few- 
months, have gone South. 

All of the winter's debutantes, as well as 

the girls who were presented to society last 
i. have offered their For the 

cabaret supper dances which are to be held at 
the Fairmont hotel on the evenings of Janu- 
ary 26th. 27th and 28th. Mrs. Francis D. 
Langton, Mrs. Howard Park and Miss 
thy Woodworth, under the capable dii 
of Fanchon and Mar nding every 

effort to make the affair a huge success. Re- 



13 



hearsals are being held on four or live morn- 
ings of each week. Girls of the Junior 
League, who are not taking part in the pro- 
gram, will don fancy costumes on that even- 
ing to sell cigarettes. 

Del Monte 

R. Walker Salisbury of Burlingame and 

Salt Lake City is being congratulated on his 
victory in the New Year's golf tournament 
at Del Monte. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Spens Black of Pied- 
mont, accompanied by Miss Spens Black of 
England, are visiting at Del Monte. 

Mr. and Mrs. Byington Ford have taken 

a house at Pebble Beach and entertained over 
the holidays Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Boisot, for- 
merly of Chicago, now of Pasadena, Mrs. 
Ford's parents, and Tirey L. Ford, Mr. Ford's 
father. 

Count Charles d'Noailles from Paris has 

been enjoying a delightful stay at Pebble 
Beach. He spent much of his time on the 
beautiful horseback trails through the forests 
and along the sandy beaches of Carmel bay. 

An array of outstanding sport features 

will be staged at Del Monte this month. Jim 
Barnes, American open champion, and Jock 
Hutchison, leading British open champion, 
will meet John Black and McDonald Smith, 
two of the California professionals, in a spe- 
cial thirty-six hole match for a large purse at 
Del Monte on Sunday, January 22d. This 
promises to be one of the greatest golf 
matches ever held on the Coast. 

Polo, wdiich has long been a favorite 

diversion of society, will be the feature to 
attract interest at Del Monte this month. An 
invitational tournament, to start on January 
28th, and run until February 5th, will of- 
ficially usher in the California season. 

Last Wednesday the first birthday of 

linn' Helen, the lovely little daughter of Mr. 

and Mrs. Thomas S. Malitn. was celebrated 
at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. H. Dingwell. Gifts and a wee pink 
birthday cake with its one pink candle made 
the day a happy one for the little girl. June 
Helen is the second daughter of the Malims. 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest improved multiple needle machine. 
Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary street. Suite 723 Whitney Building 

Phone Douglas 5232 
Oakland, Suite 424, First Nat. Bank Building 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 
at City Booking: Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 
Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



1. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

* * * * * * 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

* * * * * « 

JEWELS In Platinum 

* * « * * * 

REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

« • * * « « 

LNTQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

* * * * * * 

FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

« * * « * « 

EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 





UnNANOAy 



By P. N. BERINGER 




It is useless exercise to point out that 
business is slowly improving in this or that 
locality because such improvement is eitiier 
due to very obvious local causes or is sim- 
ply a seasonal change directly due to the 
holiday buying. It may, however, be taken 
as true that business quite generally is very 
slowly recovering. No estimate worth 
while making may be based on local con- 
ditions. If business is to improve in any 
marked degree, every factor preventing 
this marked improvement must receive at- 
tention, and these factors are so very nu- 
merous that the return to normalcy must, 
of necessity, be slowly achieved. While all 
this is true, it must be admitted by all but 
the professional crepe hanger that there 
has been improvement and that this improve- 
ment is continuing right along. This 
bettered condition is due to the ironing out 
of one or another difficulty hitherto stand- 
ing in the way of a return to normalcy. 
Gradually more peaceful conditions are be- 
ing established. The arms parley at Wash- 
ington has accomplished a great deal of 
good and has had much to do with infusing 
a more optimistic spirit in the business man. 
The financiers of the world are getting to- 
gether, and the economic parley, which we 
predicted as going to take place, is now in 
full swing. The project to establish a gold 
international trading currency is gaining 
friends everywhere. The establishing of 
such a currency has its enemies and these 
scoff at the idea that, if adopted, such a 
thing would be feasible — basing the opposi- 
tion on the fact that countries will be slow 
to give up their own currencies for an in- 
ternational issue. Those who argue in 
this way have not given the subject the 
thought it deserves and do not seem to un- 
derstand the underlying logic as to such a 
trading medium to be used only in foreign 
trade. Others state that a great many coun- 
tries haven't the gold that is necessary in 
order to obtain the relief of such a means 
of exchange. It is true that there are such 
countries but these countries have, the most 
of them, the equivalent of gold in raw or 
manufactured products. 

* * * 

The trouble between Great Britain and 
Ireland is still creating trouble and the ap- 
proval of the treaty by the legislative bodies 
of both peoples has, it seems, as far as Ire- 
land is concerned, not settled the matter. 
Germany is still a source of trouble and ir- 
ritation to the other nations. The dumping 
process undertaken by Germany in Latin 
American countries has reached its peak. 
and these countries are now beginning to 
look elsewhere as purchasers. There has 
been much trouble caused by the delivery of 
German goods of inferior quality and be- 
cause deliveries were not up to samples. 
Russ : a is gradually coming to some outward 
show of sense and the other Powers are 
about ready to extend the olive branch and 
the helping hand. China still has its inter- 
nal dissensions and it is in a very weak po- 
sition financially. The army of the South 
Chinese Republic, with Dr. Sun Yat Sen at 
its head, which was to wipe out the army 



of the republic of the North, seems still to 
be marching up the hill and has not ac- 
complished much in the way of unifying, by- 
force of arms, the North and the South. 
Other areas over the world's surface, which 
have had governments, at war the one with 
the other, are now nearer an era of peace. 
There is every reason to believe that, when 
the great powers of the world have settled 
the armament question and have had their 
economic pow-wow, immediate attention 
will be given to Russia and to China. 

* * * 

The Lenine-Trotzky regime in Russia is 
rapidly changing its policies and approach- 
ing by degrees a saner stage. The small 
minority at the head of affairs has come to 
realize that a great country may not iso- 
late itself from the world at large and ex- 
pect to survive. It is fully realized, too, 
that those who govern may not isolate the 
cities as against the country and in a great 
agricultural nation, such as Russia; it is the 
peasant who rules there always, in the final 
analysis. The peasant of Russia has learned, 
through many years of practical use of it, 
the value of co-operation, on true business 
principles and management. Communism, 
socialism, sovietism, does not appeal to him 
at all and, eventually, his anger is aroused 
and he moves to crush the opposition — that 
is what seems to be taking place right now 
and that is the main reason why the bureau- 
cracy at Petrograd is changing the tune it 
sings at home and abroad. This is a good 
thing for the world at large and will have 
its continuing effect in the big money marts. 

* * » 

Shipping — The exchange situation is im- 
proving and this has a corresponding heart- 
ening effect on business. Any improvement 
is specially welcomed by foreign traders and 
by the big shipping interests. Shipp'ng in- 
terests in San Francisco, as far as steam 
tonnage is concerned, are getting ready for 
a busy business year. Many changes have 
taken place in firms and corporations, and 
many more arc likely, but the most cheering 
news is that of vessels long tied up coming 
into use. French and British interests arc 
establishing new lines to this port. The 
[Cosmos Line, a German concern doing 
business here before the war, is reported as 
having the intention of re-establishing it- 
self, with its Pacific Coast headquarters at 
San Francisco. Business with the Mexican 
Pacific Coast is increasing and soon the 
facilities for shipment will also be increased 
by the addition of the service of three motor 
vessels, operated by the Comvn interests. 
Mexico is the country which offers the best 
advantages in foreign trade, at the present 
time, and the exporters and importers of 
New York are well aware of that fact and 
are taking every advantage that offers to 
improve trade relations. Here, in San Fran- 
cisco, we are notably lethargic about it, just 
as we are about everything else having any 
relation to foreign trade, just at this time. 

* * * 

Muling — A very good sign and one it is 
a pleasure to record is that there is more 



copper being sold than is being produced at 
the mines. Inside of three to four months 
many of the mines that are now shut down 
will be re-opened and in operation. 

* * * 

Kern county oil men are extending their 
exploration operations and are prospecting 
north of their home county. Randsburg, the 
old dry gold mining camp, is looming up as 
a great potential oil field. 

* * * 

The Funding of the Foreigner's Debts — 
Probably the most serious bar to a quick re- 
turn to normalcy and good times is the bad 
condition, financially, of those countries 
owing your Uncle Sam money. The money 
they owe does not make a small sum, and the 
interest alone mounts into the millions. It 
may just as well be dismissed from con- 
sideration that any remission of these debts 
is intended by us or that any foreign coun- 
try would seriously propose to us that we 
shoulder alone the burden of paying the 
major costs of the war. The great financiers 
at the head of affairs of nations may, how- 
ever, propose that these debts be funded so 
that payments may be made on them at a 
date far removed from the present. It has 
been proposed to make most of these pay- 
ments due in from twenty-five to fifty years. 
If such a plan were adopted, it would have 
an immediate effect in a quick stabilization 
of the economic affairs of the world. It may 
be taken for granted that the impossibility 
of wiping out these debts, at the present 
time, and the friction that is incidental to 
a constant discussion of the subject, is the 
most formidable obstacle standing in the 
way of a return to normalcy. 

* » * 

The railroad managers of the country are 
placing orders for new equipment and many 
extensions in lines and other improvements 
as to service are being contemplated. There 
arc indications that 1922 will be a much 
l»iur year in industrial lines than 1921. 
This is true of San Francisco and the manu- 
facturing area surrounding us. 

* * * 

Insurance — This week is made a little 
more interesting, among insurance men. 
through the visit here of officials of the 
Standard Accident Insurance Company of 
Detroit. J. H. Thomas, the vice-president 
of the company, is at the St. Francis. With 
him is Emerson J. Schofield, superintendent 
of agencies. The two gentlemen are on a 
tour of inspection of the agencies of the 
company. * » * 

There have been reservations made at the 
Palace for twenty district managers of the 
London Assurance Corporation, which is 
to hold a convention of Western repre- 
sentatives here. The meetings will be held 
in the French salon. J. Edward Johnson of 
Spokane holds the distinction of being the 
first of the representatives to arrive in San 
Francisco. He registered on Monday. 

* * * 

The winter lecture course of the Fire Un- 
derwriters' Association of the Pacific closed 
on December 19th at one of our noted cafes. 
The spring course will be opened after the 
rush of the holidays is over. 

* * * 

The Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 
automobile department is being superin- 
tended by one of the youngest automobile 
insurance men in the business. Kenneth M. 
Brown began with the company as an office 
boy and he has been with the Fireman's 
since 1903. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 14, 1922 



15 



Automobile 



Motor Car Prices 

REFERRING to the prices of motor 
cars for the coming year, a leading 
Eastern manufacturer says: 

For many years the trend of wage rates 
has been toward higher, rather than lower 
levels, and the length of the work day has 
been toward shorter, rather than longer 
hours. A return to the low wage rates and 
long hours of a few years ago is certainly 
unlikely. A return to the low price levels 
for manufactured products is equally un- 
likely, because the cost of manufactured 
products depends almost entirely upon the 
cost of labor. Of course there will be de- 
creases in the costs of manufactured prod- 
ucts, but no great permanent decreases will 
be made quickly. It is unlikely that the 
downward course will be any more rapid 
than the upward course has been. It is also 
unlikely that the low levels of the future 
will be as low as the low levels of the past. 
The readjustments will come gradually and 
no one who is efficient will be hurt. 

The present depression in automob'le 
sales, which has resulted from the price 
cutting, will soon be over and the purchasers 
of automobiles will again buy them on the 
basis of sound value in the various products 
without regard to the price-cuts which have 
been made. 

It will be necessary to again sell the cars 
as in normal times. The efficiency of one's 
sales organization and the soundness of the 
principles upon which one's business is 
based, will be thoroughly tested. If the 
sales organization is efficient and has re- 
tained the good will of customers it should 
continue to do a profitable business. 

It is the desire of reliable companies to 
deal fairly with the public. The public 
knows them principally through the quality 
of their product and their treatment of them, 
and their reputation is largely in the hands 
of the public. Therefore their reputation is 
something to be guarded carefully. 



THEY WANT IT ALL 



According to a correspondent of the New 
York "Times" some of the tanners and boot 
and shoe manufacturers, who appeared be- 
fore the Senate finance committee at the 
tariff hearings recently, were a bit astonished 
when informed by Senator McCumber that 
a duty on hides was in contemplation. 
This would make the new tariff bill even 

mon i table than was the Payne- 

Mdrich one, Hid< I have been on the free 
list for a number of years. The Underwood 
act merely followed, in this respect, the 
formei law enacted by a Republican admin- 
istration. But it put leather and boots ami 
shoes on the free list as well Both the 
tanning industry and that of slim-making 
have prospered exceedingly under the exist- 
ing tariff. Exports of leather and manufac- 
tures of it reached, in the calendar year lQJO. 
the amazing total of $190,318,659. Even 
with the general slump and deflation of this 
year the exports of leather in the ten months 
ended with October amounted to $24,048,474, 

while those of boots and shoes wei 
601.978. The import- ot boots and 
during the same period amounted to only 
$450,000. and. of leather. $7,097,959. Vet the 
boot and shoe manufacturers are seeking to 
have a tariff imposed for a protection they 



do not need. They are now providing the 
footwear for more than 99 per cent of the 
population of the country, besides supplying 
the needs of many in practically every na- 
tion on the globe. The only effect of a 
duty on hides, another on leather and still 
another on boots and shoes would be to give 
the big packers a monopoly of the tanning 
industry — which they nearly have now — 
and add to the cost of every pair of shoes 
worn in the country, which cost is now 
more than it should be. 



SLAVERY IN YAP 



Although the Island of Yap has been gov- 
erned successively by Spaniards, Germans 
and Japanese, slavery is still practiced there 
and shows no signs of dying out. The Yap 
slaves are a darker race than their native 
masters and they have black, slightly curly 
hair. They are owned by chiefs and some 
are the property of wealthy native women. 

Tradition says that the slaves are de- 
scended from early invaders who came to 
Yap in war canoes from other islands, but 
were overpowered by the original inhabi- 
tants. 

Many of the men were killed, but the 
women and children were spared and forced 
to labor in the taro (an edible plant root) 
patches. 

Yap society is divided in three classes, 
namely machmach or medicine men, the 
pilung or aristocracy and the pimliaga or 
slaves. The medicine men are still power- 
ful despite the years of missionary work by 
Spanish priests. They prophesy, tell for- 
tunes and sometimes put a taboo on various 
parts of the island. A taboo is a serious 
matter for the traders, as no native will 
work on a tabooed plantation. While it lasts 
the laborers lake a holiday and the traders' 
profits shrink. The taboo, however, is 
sometimes use. I to prevent plundering. Al- 
though the Yap natives are "middling hon- 
est." our of their principal deities is the god 
of thieves, who has a considerable number 
of worshippers on the island. 



BOOM IN POCKET FLASKS 



led fla-ks. formerly seen only when 
encased in gold or silver, with elaborate 
filigree work or handsomely engraved mon- 
ograms, have fallen from their high caste 
anil now no regular 5 and 10 cent or cheap 
novelty store is complete without them. 
With a cheap metal case to protect the 
glass, they are labeled "unbreakable." and 
piled in heap- on tables marked "15 cents 
each." Manufacturers are turning these re- 
ceptacles out by the thousands. They may 
be used as nor- ng bottles, the clerk said. 



Up to the end of the second month of 
life, human beings and apes pass through 
identical stages of development. 



Lake Victoria, in Africa, the second lar- 
esh water lake in the world, is almost 
exactly circular. 



The popularity of June as a month for 
marriage is inherited from the ancient 
Greeks and Romans. 



Sheep store their surplus fat in their 
tails, as camels do in their humps. 



In the old China of empire days soldier- 
ing was regarded the basest of occupations. 




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GUS' FASHION 

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French and Italian Dinners 

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Automobile and Household Goods a 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




PI/E/ASURE/S WAND 



Obey No Wand but Pleasure's. — Tom Moore. 




Orpheum Attractions 
Sallie Fisher, that clever actress and 
charming singer, appears this week in Clare 
Kummer's popular vauedville act, "The 
Choir Rehearsal," and delights Orpheum 
fans with her song, "A Wonderful Thing 
Has Come Into My Life." The famous 
Foy family are still in our midst and una- 
bated is the mirth they occasion. Frank 
Kellam and Pa.ricia O'Dare have an amus- 
ing line of songs and jokes in their skit, 
"Chasing the Blues." The "Follies of 1776" 
offers vast entertainment to the admirers of 
this variety of show. Frank Farron. who 
calls himself a dealer in laughs, drives a 
very good bargain. The Ruth Howell Duo 
of Aerialists do dangerous activities in space, 
and the timid onlooker ardently wishes they 
wouldn't. Fred Lindsay has a good act and 
an unusual one, showing the hunter and 
sportsman in his element. Muldoon, Frank- 
lyn and Rose afford considerable amuse- 
ment with their songs and dances. 



Columbia's Opera 
The second week has seen increasing num- 
bers attending Russian grand opera, despite 
the unusual language and the little-known 
operas. Much can be said, both for the 
Columbia management in bringing these 
people to us and the company themselves in 
setting so high a standard. The music- 
lovers of San Francisco are demonstrating 
at every performance their appreciation ot 
the artists and their splendid work. Especi- 
ally have the native Russian operas been 
well attended, and the glimpses into the life 
of that interesting country added their at- 
traction to the excellent manner in which 
the operas are presented. The artists pos- 
sess voices of a high order. Such singers as 
Bourskaya, Mashir, Daniloff, Redcef — they 
are a delight to hear, and the dramatic abil- 
ity displaj'ed by the entire troup is a revela- 
tion. 

Fun-No-End at Alcazar 

Almost before the curtain stops rising on 
"Up in Mabel's Room" we begin to laugh 
and until its final drop we continue to laugh. 
That inimitably droll Charles Yule start? 
us off, and his mischievous work is kept up 
by every member of the Alcazar company 
taking part in this merry little farce. Rich- 
ard Allen and Marie Dunkle, hitherto rather 
serious people, abandon themselves to the 
fun of the thing, and Ben Erway has one 
gigantic joyous jag. Gladys George and 
Dudley Ayres are prime movers in the joke, 
and if to laugh with a friend is to love him. 
then we are more than ever in love with the 
leading man and lady of the company. Ned 
Doyle and Anna Macnaughtan, themselves 
possessed of a delightful sense of humor, 
keep the ball rolling, and little ingenue-ish 
Laura Lee joins in wholeheartedly. Colette 
Forbes has a pretty French accent and wears 
a wicked little maid's cap. Mr. Myers, the 
conductor, is not willing for all the fun to 
take place on the other side of the foot- 
lights, and gives us a spirited program. Mr. 
Samuels (himself) looks in upon a box full 
of his friends and adds one more broad grin 
to the picture. "What Would You Do?" 
plays the orchestra as we leave the theatre. 
and the answer to that is — just laugh! 



The Players 
The 300th anniversary of the birth of that 
famous French satirist, Moliere, is being 
celebrated this month at the Players theatre 
by the production of "Le Bourgeois Gentil- 
homme." In such capable hands the play is 
a brilliant success and its first night was at- 
tended by many society folk, celebrities, 
critics and everything. A memorable per- 
formance and one of which Frank Darien, 
the producer, may well be proud. Carl 
Kroenke portrayed Monsieur Jourdain. the 
most comic hero of the piece, and in this 
role acquired new laurels for his excellent 
acting. The entire cast is admirable, and 
standing out among the characters are the 
Marquise of Katherine Edson, the merry 
maidservant of Carolyn Green and the 
Philosopher of Leon Bowen. The bill 
changes for February, and it seems a pity 
to think of a single theatre-loving San 
Franciscan missing this tremendous treat. 
Long live the Players and their plays! 



California 

Thomas Meighan's role of near-prince is 
not a new one, but he fills the bill admirably 
as the blase millionaire in George Cohan's 
"A Prince There Was." The popular star 
wends his way very nonchalantly through 
the picture, winning the heroine, Mildred 
Harris, in a surprisingly easy fashion. A 
number of comments were heard on the 
opening night on the fine setting for Heller's 
orchestra. The management is to be con- 
gratulated upon its triumph, as are Hellet 
and George Simondet for their delightful 
musical offerings. Larry Semon was pre- 
sented in "his best comedy" One breathes 
a prayer that one has not to sec his worst. 



Nazimova's "Camille" — Imperial 
Help! Help! Shades of the immortal 
Dumas! 

Well, Camille a la Nazimova was served 
up in an unexcelled display of gowns and 
luxury. But — if the producers land in the 
same place in the Hereafter with Alexandre 
Dumas, (unlikely as that may seem), we 
are afraid it will go rough with them. 

Overlooking the modernisms, however, 
Nazimova's "Camille" is striking, at times 
interesting, and often intensely human. Ru- 
dolph Valentino is an impetuous and hand- 
some Armand, called upon to do idiotic 
things, but why revert to unpleasant mem- 
ories! A possible unfamiliarity with the 
original on the part of the throngs at each 
presentation would account for their un- 
mitigated pleasure. 



Orpheum's Next Bill 

There will be an extraordinary nine-act bill 
at the Orpheum next week. Lillian Shaw 
will offer her dialect ballads, opening with a 
Hebrew character. Gladys Clark and Henry 
Bergman will offer "Tunes of the Hour" ami 
will be assisted by the Dale Sisters, famous 
as dancing sprites. Joe Morris and Flo 
Campbell will sing and chat in their skit. 
"Avi-ate-her." William Demarcst and Estelle 
Collette will appear in "Strings and String- 
ers." Tarzan will create much ctiri, ,~it\'. 
Nihla will pose as a model of perfect form 
with a magnificent setting. Rodero and Mar- 



coni will offer the musical comedy surprise, 
"Quips and Queries." Blanche Sherwood and 
Brother will present a fast and exciting aerial 
act. Miss Sallie Fisher and her capable com- 
pany will remain another week in her "Choir 
Rehearsal." 

Alcazar New Bill 

"The Net," a comedy drama which en- 
joyed a most successful season on Broad- 
way, has been obtained for presentation at 
the Alcazar beginning next Sunday after- 
noon, January 15th. It has been repeatedly 
acclaimed by the critics as having all of the 
ingredients necessary to please the most 
fastidious audience. 

The leading roles will be in the hands 
of Gladys George and Dudley Ayres with 
Lucille Shirpser, talented juvenile, specially 
engaged, and the scenic features will be on 
an elaborate scale. 

Interesting Lectures 

Dr. and Mrs. F. Homer Curtiss, formerly of 
New York, will give a series of seven private 
class lessons. Monday and Thursday after- 
noons, 2:30 o'clock, in the Paul Elder gal- 
lery, on "The Origin and Meaning of Num- 
bers and Symbols." The first lesson, January 
16th, will be "From the Unmanifested to the 
Manifested," giving the origin of the numer- 
ical systems and why symbols — cosmic, na- 
tional, local and personal — are necessary. 

The lecturers are authors of many widely- 
read volumes including "Realms of the Liv- 
ing Dead," "The Key to the Universe." "The 
Voice of Isis." c tc. Their new book, "The 
Message of Aquaria," is just being published. 



Benefit of Jesuit Fathers 
Friends of the Jesuit Fathers are arrang- 
ing for a grand popular concert, to take 
place Monday evening, January 30th, at the 
Civic Auditorium, for the benefit of the 
liquidation fund of St. Ignatius church and 
college. 

The two principal singers at the concert 
will be Renato Zanelli, famous baritone of 
tin Metropolitan Opera Company, and Miss 
Dracc Wagner, young American dramatic 

Wedding Presents— The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell streets. 



|! 



1t*E OfcST 







i 



J OvAuuti&xaux 't ■ 



MA Ji,?v EES 25 AND 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 

ALWAYS A GREAT SHOW 

Smoking permitted in dress circle 
and loges 



CALIF* >RNIA ADVERTISER FOR JANUARY 14, 1922 



soprano. This will be the first appearance 
on the Pacific Coast of these two artists. 



Prizes, Produced by Vivaudou of New York 
and Paris, Given Away at Techau 
Tavern 
Lady patrons of this famous cafe will find 
something new again to amuse and be of 
interest during the evening's entertainment. 
And that is the expectancy of receiving a 
prize of Mai D'or Pattie. made by the fa- 
mous Vivaudou of New York and Paris, and 
enclosed in a lovely gold-plated vanity box. 
For this is the new prize that is being given 
at the Tavern to the lady winners of the 
lucky dances. The lucky man partner re- 
ceives Melachrino cigarettes as his prize. 
There is no competition to these dances. It 
is just luck. A mere matter of where you 
stand when the orchestra stops playing. So 
everybody has an equal chance. The dances 
are during dinner and after the theatre. 
Every evening these dances are the vogue, 
amateur nights as well as other nights. 



Fairmont Grill Luncheon 

More and more it has become the habit 
of men and women who desire to make their 
luncheon hour one of thorough relaxation 
amidst surroundings that favor it, to go 
to the Fairmont hotel, the meeting place of 
the best known people in San Francisco. 
The grill luncheon at 75 cents is incom- 
parable, and the service is as good as the 

menu. 

Bears in the National Parks 



The v : sit of tourists to see the wonders 
of winter in the Yosemite has brought the 
visitors' attention to the tameness of wild 
animals in the national park. The bears 
are a constant source of interest. In the 
Yellowstone Park if cars' arc left alone for 
awhile black bears may be found pawing 
under the seat in search of food. The bears 
are fairly tame, because they are never mo- 
lested, but they are wild enough to claw 
the tourist who tries to drive them off with 
nothing more than temper and a stick. 

"The rangers in the Yellowstone Park 
really have to protect the bears from tour- 
ists." says Mr. Heller, the superintendent. 
"because the animals flock around the hotels 
for food." Occasionally a tourist gets tan- 
gled up with one so badly that the bear 
has to be shot. Now the bears have regu- 
lar feeding places where the waste from the 
hotels is dumped. 

"They come loping in at regular hours, 
often a mother bear bringing her cubs. She 
will put the cubs up a tree and tell them 
to stay there. If they come down while she 
is feeding, she runs back and cuffs them into 
the tree again, just like naughty children. 

ii. n go i a meal, climb a 

tree in full view 01 peO| 50 to sleep. 



"They are funny things. They walk like 
a man when they stand up. When they are 
in a tree they often sit like a man, with legs 
dangling on each side of a branch and 
clutching the trunk in front of them. They 
often break into hotels. Big logs will 
baffle them, but any ordinary house with 
clapboards or square corners which they 
can get hold of they rip open with a few 
pulls from their powerful paws. 

"One bear followed me around for days, 
trotting at my heels like a dog. He was 
as tame as a kitten. They are dangerous 
for persons who don't know how to treat 
them, however. There arc about sixty griz- 
zlies in Yellowstone Park now, although 
they are not. seen so often as the others 
and, of course, are more dangerous. You 
should see the black and cinnamon bears 
run when a grizzly comes up to the feeding 
place behind the hotel. They scatter in 
every direction and take to the trees, for a 
grizzly, although he can run like a horse, 
can't climb trees." 



Business Notes 



The depression among insurance men as 
to the business done in the last months of 
the year 1921 has given way to a better 
feeling. The falling off of business will be 
found to be not nearly as much as has been 
asserted by certain insurance men. The 
figure as to the falling off is now placed at 
only about fifteen per cent. 



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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



JANUARY 14, 1922 



SUNBEAMS 



The Half Has Never Been Told— "Half 
the world doesn't know how the other half 
gets an auto," says the Huntsville "Herald" 
wisely. — Kansas City Star. 



To Avoid the Rush — "Last evening, sir, I 
distinctly saw my daughter sitting in your 
lap. What explanation have you to make?" 

"I got here early, sir; before the others." 
— Carolina Tar Baby. 



Her Anxiety — Doctor — I'm afraid I will 
have to operate for appendicitis. 

Beauty — Oh, doctor, will the scar show? 

Doctor — Not unless you go into the films. 
— London Mail. 



The Husband — Look here, my dear, won't 
you want to take some fiction with you to 
pass away the time? 

The Wife — No, darling — you'll be send- 
ing me some letters, won't you? — London 
Opinion. 

An Old Friend — She — Is there a departed 
spirit with whom you would like to com- 
municate?" 

He (eagerly) — Yes. 

"Who?" 

"Johnnie Walker." — Texas Scalper. 



Same Here — Husband — The Orientals 
have a curious custom of taking off their 
shoes before entering the house. 

Wife — The men in this country do the 
same when they come home at 2 a. m. — De- 
troit News. 

Spreading the Glad Tidings— "Would you 
give a wayworn wanderer a bite to eat, 
mum?" 

"I will, if you'll do me a favor." 

"What is it, mum?" 

"Go across the street to that green house, 
ask the woman over there for a cup of 
coffee and say you saw a new electric 
washing machine in my house. She's been 
going around telling the neighbors I couldn't 
afford one." — Birmingham Age-Herald. 



The Retort Courteous — "Ah suah pity 
you," said a colored pugilist to his op- 
ponent as they squared off. "Ah was born 
with boxin' gloves on." 

"Maybe you was, retorted the other, "and 
Ah reckon you'se goin' to die de same 
way." — Boston Transcript. 



A Misunderstanding — "Where have you 

been, Henry?" 

"Down to the drug store." 

"Didn't I tell you to beat that rug?" 

"I didn't so understand you. You said to 

take that rug out and hang it on the line 

and beat it. I did." — Judge. 



Like Real Life — The high school seniors 
were rehearsing their class play and the 
bride and bridegroom had come on the stage. 
After their sentimental little scene they pro- 
ceeded to sit down at the breakfast table 
while the amateur comedian did his tun:. 
And straightway the bridegroom grew in- 
terested in the make-believe food and didn't 
even look at his bride. Then the director 
grew sarcastic. 

"Here, you bridegroom 1" he shouted, 



what's the matter? You're not paying any 
attention to your bride! Are you tired of 
her already?" 

The bridegroom colored and became con- 
fused. "Oh, I forgot this was a play," he 
stammered. — Indianapolis News. 



"You have a nerve to suggest my taking 
you into partnership. What's the idea?" 

"Wouldn't you rather have your daughter 
marry your partner than your clerk?" — 
Judge. 

The Threat Indirect — "Aw," said Willie, 
"you're afraid to fight; that's all it is." 
."No, I'm not," protested Jack, "but if I 
fight my ma'll find it out and lick me." 

"How'll she find it out?" 

"She'll see the doctor goin' to your house." 
— O. E. R. Bulletin. 



The Acid Test — During a campaign pre- 
ceding the election of a Missouri Congress- 
man it was suggested that, since he posed 
as a good business man, he might be willing 
to tell just what a good business man is. 

"That's easy." he explained. "A good 
business man is one who can buy goods 
from a Scotchman and sell them to a Jew — 
at a profit!" — The Alabama Baptist. 



Professional Temptation — Patient — Great 
Scott, doctor! That's an awful bill for one 
week's treatment. 

Doctor — My dear fellow, if you knew 
what an interesting case yours was and 
how strongly I was tempted to let it go to 
a post-mortem, you wouldn't grumble at a 
bill three times as big as this. — Boston 
Transcript. 

Doctor's Probe for Fees — Dubb — Why do 
you always question patients so closely 
about what they eat? Does the informa- 
tion you get help you to diagnose their 
case? 

Doctor — Oh, no! But by doing so I am 
enabled to guess what their station in life 
is, and how much in fees I can probably 
get out of them. — Science and Invention 
Magazine. 

"I never saw the equal of those Jagsbys 
next door," said Mr. Bibbles. "They are 
always wanting to borrow something. I 
honestly believe we've lent them everything 
in the house except the piano and our twin 
beds." 

"I'm sorry you are so wrought up," said 
Mrs. Bibbles. "Mr. Jagsbys has just sent 
over to know if — " 

"Don't say it! Don't say it!" 

"If you have a few empty bottles you 
could spare, pint or quart size." 

"Out of the way, woman! I'll take them 
over myself." — Birmingham Age-Herald. 



The Final Word — At a dinner one even- 
ing when the soup came on they started an 
argument about the price of the sitting-room 
carpet, or it might have been the gravel for 
the front garden. As the fish was served 
the argument was getting hotter; the joint 
saw it a little warmer still, until, when the 
dessert arrived, both husband and wife 
could scarcely eat for indignation. Then the 
wife interrupted herself to say to her hus- 
band, in a plaintive voice: "I don't know 



whatever would happen, Paul, if you ever 
agreed with me on any topic." He looked 
at his better half and sighed. "I'd be 
wrong," he said — "I'd be wrong." — Wash- 
ington Post. 

Ceylon produces the world's finest cin- 
namon. 

Some of the best hour glasses contain 
powdered eggshell in place of sand. 



Wallpaper too bold or bright in pattern 
is said to be bad for the nerves. 



No fewer than thirty-seven nationalities 
are represented on the staff of one of the 
big New York hotels. 



North — Why is your wife so jealous of 
your stenographer? 

West — My wife used to be my stenographer. 
—Judge. 

"More progress." "What now?" "One of 
our ultra smart widows has come out in 
sport mourning." — Louisville Courier-Jour- 
nal. 

Sally — I cut off my hair just because it is 
=o comfortable that way. 

Margot — You girls who bob your hair for 
comfort remind me of the woman who didn't 
wear her wedding ring because it was so hot. 
—Judge. 

A Business Builder — "It says here in the 
paper that Dr. Jones is a pathologist. What 
does that mean, dad?" 

"A pathologist, my boy, is a doctor who 
invents diseases for other doctors to cure." 
— New York Sun. 



Lady — Aren't you ashamed to beg? You 
are so ragged that .1 am ashamed of you my- 
self. 

Hobo — Yes, it is kind of a reflection on 
the generosity of the neighborhood, mum. — 
American Legion Weekly. 



Cleaner of Artist's Studio — Such a mess in 
'ere, Mrs. Baggs ; they must 'a' bin in a state 
last night. 

Second Cleaner — Shameful. I calls it; and 
then 'as the cheek to say it's their artistic 
temperance. — London Opinion. 



Pa's "Joke" — "Edith, your mother tells 
me that you serve refreshments to all the 
young men who call on you." 

"Yes, papa." 

"Well, you must think I have money to 
burn, feeding the flames that way." — Boston 
Transcript. 

Boss — What do you mean by such lan- 
guage? Are you the manager here or am I? 

Jones — I know I'm not the manager. 

The Boss — Very well, then, if you're not 
the manager, why do you talk like a blamed 
idiot? — The Stenographer. 



Oh, Heavens, No! — She had accepted his 
embraces without reserve, but every time 
she seemed to be on the verge of going to 
sleep. It was most exasperating. Finally 
he remonstrated. 

"See here," he demanded peevishly. "Why 
do you always appear asleep when I kiss 
you?" 

"Why, Harry," she retorted indignantly. 
"You don't for a minute think I'm the sort 
of girl who would do such things with my 
eyes open!" — American Legion Weekly. 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 31st 
March, 1921 




$ 24,826,000.00 
17,125,000.00 

24,826,000.00 



$378,462,443.00 



OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

358 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua 

(New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian 

Banking Business. Wool and ctner Produce Credits Arranged 



Head Office 
GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 



London Office 
29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 
Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 
SAVINGS 526 California Street, San Francisco, Calif. COMMERCIAL 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and Twenty-first Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement Street and Seventh Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31, 1921 

Assets $71,851,299.62 

Deposits 68,201,299.62 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,650,000.00 

Employes' Pension Fund 371,753.46 



A dividend of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum was 
declared for the six months ending December 31, 1921 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 

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FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6%% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"The Palace Way" 

Rales; 35c per day; S7.50 per monlli 

Phone Douglas 243 



SIX FLOORS FOR SERVICE AND STORAGE 
OF AUTOMOBILES 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive 
and durable boxes containing five hundred 
perfect sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The 
manuscript covers are sold in similar boxes 
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desired, we will send a sample book showing 
the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 

37-45 First Street San Francisco 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 
Xo visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. ra.) . . 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays . $1.75 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St 

Phone Douglas 2433 




BUILT LIKE A WATCH 



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INSURANCE 

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GEO. ORMOND SMITH, Manager 



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VOL-XCX 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 1922 



No. 3 



THE SAX FRANCISCO XBWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISE); is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— Oakland is objecting to a bridge across the bay before there is 
anything to show the money can be raised. 

— Last Sunday was very dull. Only four killed in motor accidents. 
The motoris's must all have been attending church. 

— Wets may camouflage their cellars by hanging fake W. C. T. U. 
stars in the windows and fooling whisky pirates. 

— It is announced that Easterners will spend $150,000 on Nevada 
property. Are they going to buy the whole state? 

— The Arbuckle cases will be fine items in District Atlorney 
Brady's record when he comes to run for re-election — if he should 
run. 

— Postmaster General Hays, it is said, intends to make the movies 
"the greatest educational force in the United States." What kind 
of education? 

— While the Drys and Wets are debating whether it's constitutional 

to search for liquor without a warrant, the bootleggers are getting 

the easy money in large bales. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Our Chief of Police and our District Altorney do not agree on 

whether drunkenness has increased 100 per cent in the past year. 

Aren't records of arrest made? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The city of Montreal dispenses liquor itself — one bottle a day 

to one man — and makes almost enough to pay the taxes. Better 

than having the bootleggers making millions and poisoning the 

people. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Now they're debating whether Columbus wasn't born in Portugal 

instead of Genoa, Italy. If there's to be any doubt on the subject. 

Los Angeles will claim him. It claims almost everything except 

Noah and a few such back numbers. 

* * * 

— The large crowd of importers and jobbers who attended the 
meeting of the Board of Supervisors on Monday to hear Super- 
visor Shannon's report of his trip to the Orient to cement commer- 
cial relations (for which the Board gave him $2000 trip money) 
were much disappointed, as the commercial ambassador was no' 
quite ready to report. But he will report. 



— Instead of jailing I. W. W. propagandists for meddling with 
labor matters and giving hoboes free board and lodging for the 
winter, why don't the police drive the bums out of town? They 
should be forced to steer a plow or swing an ax. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The town of Tiffien, Ohio, is fighting the bread trust, but in 
San Francisco we keep on handing our dimes to the bakers' com- 
bine as if wheat had not tumbled to the bottom of the list of re- 
duced commodities a year ago. 

— New Jersey has filed a petition of 15,000 names wi h the 
United States Senate, asking Volstead amendments. And that is 
only a starter. Wait until the American people, who are opposed 
to tyrannical sumptuary laws, get into the fight in earnest. 

— The more counties are heard from, the clearer it becomes that 
Hiram Johnson has got out of step with the Progressives on tearing 
the Pacific pact to pieces. It may please Hearst, but that great 
patriot doesn't quite represent the whole American public. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The Irish are established in Dublin Caslle without any rent 
to pay — if you don't count in the salaries of all the useful and 
ornamental functionaries it takes to run a government. And be sure 
our Irish Free State will have its share of them. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— United States Senator McCormick wants the State Department 
at Washington to furnish such information as it has on the financial 
affairs of European governments. Wonder how much real informa- 
tion it has on our country without going any further? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The Prohibitionists claim to have secured $57,500,000 "in 
penalties, revenues and special taxes" in the past year. The Con- 
gressional Record, which is an authority, gives the total of prohibi- 
tion fines and collections as $2,500,000, and the cost of hired en- 
forcers close to $7,000,000. Who is lying? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The State Supreme Court has ruled municipal bonds cannot 
be sold at less than par value, but all the same the builders of 
school houses and other contractors will dodge the law and take 
bonds for their over-priced work. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The News Letter's article in last week's issue about Marshall 
Field's Chicago department store selling for five dollars a nine-cent 
pocket knife made in Germany has caused much comment. If you 
want the inside facts on politics or profiteering, read the News 
Letter every week. It will pay you. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— In the seventeenth century in Europe, piracy was a recognized 
profession. Queen Elizabeth accepted gifts from Francis Drake, the 
boss sea marauder, and made him a knight. The noble profession 
of 1922 is smuggling bootleg whisky from Cuba, the Bermudas and 
Canada. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1922 




The driver of an automobile on the wrong side 
Should Be Jailed of the street, passing a street car which had 

stopped to allow passengers to alight, has injured 
a little school girl. He could not wait a few seconds till the street 
car had moved on, and he injured a human being perhaps for 
life. Many motorists whizz by passengers alighting from street cars, 
instead of halting for a moment. When arrested for injuring people 
by willful violation of the law, motoris's should receive heavy sen- 
tences. The proposed law by Legislator Rosensheim that imprison- 
ment instead of fines be imposed is admirable. 



The effort of the Agri- 
Federal Reserve Board Called Extravagant cultural "bloc" to ob- 
tain recognition on the 
Federal Reserve Board is leading to agitation in Congress. Senator 
Overman of North Carolina is quoted by the Congressional Record 
as describing "the amazing waste of money and extravagance on 
the part of certain Federal Reserve Banks." He refers to the San 
Francisco Federal Reserve Bank as an example of extravagance in 
the increase of salaries, it having advanced them $945,861 from 
1919 to 1920. Senator Overman addressing the Senate said: 

"The Federal Reserve Board has spent more than $17,000,000 
for a bank building in New York — the finest, most extravagant 
bank building in the world, costing more than any public building 
in Washington ; more than the Capitol in which we sit here, which 
cost $15,000,000. They paid the architect and engineer more than 
$1,000,000. They appropriated $800,000 for furniture. 

"In the last few years they have spent $36,000,000 for public 
buildings in various places in the country. Besides that they have 
increased salaries since 1919, when everybody else was reducing 
salaries. In an amazing manner they have increased the salaries in 
the several districts in an amount in excess of $7,000,000. 

"Therefore, for all these reasons, I think we ought to have a 
farmer on that board, in the hope that he may be able to bring 
about certain much-needed reforms. 

"Let me call particular attention to some of the salaries paid in 
the New York banks. Six received more than $20,000; twen'y 
receive over $10,000. They have taken men from the various banks 
in New York, where they were getting three or four thousand dol- 
lars a year, and have quadrupled and quintupled their salaries. 
They have increased salaries in New York alone $509,800. 

"The law requires that 40 per cent of the net receipts of these 
banks should be paid into the Treasury as a franchise tax, but they 
came to Congress in the Sixty-sixth Congress and requested that the 
law be amended, permitting the Federal Reserve Banks to create 
a maximum surplus of more than 100 per cent. It was also stated, 
when the bill was before the Senate for consideration and before 
the House of Representatives for consideration, that the Federal 
Reserve system was not intended to make a cent of profit, that it 
was to be run entirely in the interest of the people; but they have 
been making so much profit, after getting the law amended so they 
could retain 100 per cent surplus, that they did not know what 
To do with it, so they are wasting it by increasing salaries over 
$7,000,000 since 1919, and by erecting these extravagant, magnifi- 
cent buildings, one of which cost more than any public building in 
Washington, more than the Capitol itself. 

"I ask permission to insert in the Record as a part of my re- 
marks, without reading, a list of the salaries in the Federal Reserve 
Bank of New York and the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, 
as well as a statement showing the increase in salaries of the bank 



officers generally from 1919 to 1920. I offer the same thing as to 
every one of them. They have increased the salaries in New York 
$1,168,948 since 1919. In Chicago the salaries have been increased 
$1,408,000; in San Francisco $945,861 ; in Kansas City $595,495." 



Too much should not be expected of 
Ireland Faces Tax Problem the new Free State of Ireland. It is 
a hard thing to establish any private 
business. Eighty per cent of private business ventures fail. Estab- 
lishing a popular government is the most difficult of tasks. Lack 
of capital is the chief difficulty in private business ventures. So it 
is in popular government. The politicians invariably want more 
money for their government than the people can afford. We are 
now spending over six billions a year in the United States. We 
used to get along on one billion and considered it extravagant. 

Ireland will have the support of all its officials and pay interest on 
its share of the public debt. Its new form of government is neces- 
sarily more or less of an experiment, and all experiments are costly. 

Taxation is now the great problem of the world. Ireland will 
not escape it. however patriotic or wise its rulers. They have prob- 
lems of taxation ahead of them that will tax all their ingenuity. 
There is one comfort for the taxpayers of the Free Irish State. 
They cannot suffer more from any politicians they put in office than 
do most of the nations. 



It is announced that Walter J. 
Labor Agitation in Mexico Risky Yarrow, who figured in the recent 

oil workers' troubles in Califor- 
nia, is going to Mexico to act as a sort of labor overlord of indus- 
trial reforms. The Obregon government, it is intimated, "has been 
impressed by his original and forceful methods." One of Mr. Yar- 
row's plans in the California troubles was to name the strikers as 
peace officers and place the responsibility on them. It was like the 
altruistic plan of some prison wardens who place their life-termers 
on their honor not to escape, and turn over the control of the 
prisons to the convicts. Very fine in theory and worthy of serious 
discussion in a lunatic asylum. 

It might be prudent for Leader Yarrow to remember that Mexico 
is not changed seriously from the conditions of mind that swayed 
the Republic when Diaz was dictator. Diaz was not very tender of 
heart towards labor leaders. Not long before his abdication some 
striking bakers burned down a bakery in the City of Mexico and 
killed the boss baker. A company of Diaz "rurales" took seven of 
the rioters and shot them on the ruins of the burned bakeshop. 
Labor leadership has been risky business in the Southern Republic. 



The decision of the State Supreme Court 
Contractors and Bonds that municipalities cannot lawfully sell their 

bonds below par, is not likely to prevent 
the municipalities from breaking the law. The practice is for con- 
tractors of school houses and other public buildings to accept 
municipal bonds ins'ead of cash and charge more for their work. 
Thus the public is doubly injured. The bonds are accepted by the 
contractors, nominally at par value, but it is well understood that 
the contractors will discount them as soon as possible. To make up 
for that discount the contractors put an extra price on their work 
and often do slipshod work. The taxpayers are robbed. The whole 
transaction is unlawful and crooked, but in the general disrespect 
of the laws by municipalities there is little chance of the crooks 
being punished. The taxpayers have to suffer, and it is hard to see 



January 21, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



how they can escape from such impositions as long as municipal 
government is made politics instead of business. Every hobo who 
is registered can cast a vote at municipal elections, and it counts 
for as much as the ballot of the most wor'hy citizen. 

If municipalities would exclude from iheir elections all persons 
who do not pay some taxes, and have no direct interest in the 
proper government of the cities, there would be less bonds issued, 
less debts to be paid and a more businesslike administration. But 
our public officials are not chosen for their business fitness, but for 
their skill as politicians, and we generally often get the most unfit 
public servants instead of the worthiest. 



Secretary of the Treasury Mellon says that 
Non-Taxable Bonds more than ten thousand million dollars of 

non-taxable bonds are now outstanding. The 
Government does not collect a cent on them. The load of taxation 
is thus made heavier for the people who pay taxes — the owners of 
small houses, a small business, and the public service corporations 
that have to give a percentage of their earnings to the Government. 
Non-taxable bonds mean the ruin of the country, unless the states 
and cities are prevented from issuing such securities to carry on 
their extravagance. Taxation is the vital question before the Amer- 
ican people today. 



While the Drys in Congress profess 
Soldiers Will Not Be Insulted to regard all attempts to legalize 

the use of beer and wine as futile, 
they are really very apprehensive that the two beverages will soon 
be allowed. The speeches of Congressmen, regarded as leaders of 
the Dry movement, indicate anxiety. What they fear is the money 
side of the question. Duties on beer and wine would bring large 
sums to the public treasury and lighten the heavy burden on the 
taxpayers. Above all, the proposal to use duties on beer and wine 
to furnish a bonus for the soldiers disturbs the Dry Congressmen. 
They are arguing that it would be unworthy of heroes who fought 
for the liberty of the world to demean themselves by accepting the 
money obtained in duties on beverages prohibited by the Constitu- 
tion of the United States — indirectly prohibited, but nevertheless 
placed under a ban. 

One of the most significant speeches delivered has been given 
utterance by Representative Blanton of Texas. It is reported in full 
in the Congressional Record. Mr. Blanton in his address said: 

"For nearly half a century some of the best people of the United 
States have endeavored with all their might and main to free this 
Government from the liquor traffic. They have freed it from the 
liquor traffic by the fundamental law of the land. Even though we 
now have bootleggers in the various states of the Union, even 
though we have illicit stills in various counties and states, yet the 
fact remains that there is a ban upon the manufacture and sale of 
intoxicating liquors throughout this land, and it is a ban that is 
going to stay, because it is in the Constitution, "let I am sorry to 
say that the press of the country reports —whether truly or not I do 
not know — that the chairman of our great Ways and Means Com- 
mittee has given out to the public the statement that after the 
Christmas recess he and his committee are to consider seriously the 
advisability of attempting to disregard the constitutional law of our 
land and to recognize as a legitimate business of the country the 
manufacture and sale of certain kinds of liquors containing a cer- 
tain per cent of alcohol, and that their excuse for so doing is that 
they will thereby raise a tax to pay a debt that this Government 
owes to the ex-service men of our country. I want to say that such 
an excuse is an insult to the soldiery of our land. It is an insult to 
the American soldier and the American sailor, who through great 
sacrifice were able to bring a world victory back from France. I 
want to say that they stand for the very highest that there is in 
this Nation. I want to say that they do not want a bonus as badly 



as that; that they are not put to that great extreme where they 
would want this Congress to attempt to disregard the fundamental 
law of the land in order to pay its debts. Surely there can be 
found a legitimate means whereby this Nation can pay what is due 
to the ex-service men of our country without recognizing an unlaw- 
ful traffic, a traffic that has been made unlawful by the fundamen'al 
law of our land. I want to say that this promise which the chair- 
man of the Committee on Ways and Means has made that he will 
take up this matter shorily after the new year presents a serious 
question. It is a proposition that the people of this country are not 
going to stand for, if the chairman of that committee or his com- 
mittee attempt to over-ride the Constitution. It is a question con- 
cerning which this Congress is going to hear from the people of 
this Nation from Seattle to Florida and from the Pacific Ocean to 
the Atlantic. The voice of the people on this question is going to 
be overwhelming. There is a proper way whereby the Constitu'ion 
can be changed, and only that is the way that those who would 
seek to change it should go about to bring that procedure into effect. 

"If a majority of the people of this country want to exempt light 
wines and beer from the provision of the Constitution there is a 
constitutional way whereby they can do it. They can let Congress 
submit the question to the people of the United States, and they 
can let the legislatures of the country pass upon it." 

Notwithstanding what the Texas Representative thinks about in- 
sulting the ex-service men by paying their bonus out of the millions 
of duty on beer and wines, we doubt very seriously whe'her a large 
percentage of the men would not consider such a proposition very 
sensible and perfectly proper. The world has been making and 
drinking beer and wine for over 9000 years, and the human race 
has not deteriorated. Nearly the whole world except the United 
States now uses beer and wines, and is suffering no disastrous con- 
sequences, physical or moral. To have the American nation placed 
under tyrannical sumptuary laws, excluding light beer and wines, 
to gratify a fanatical propaganda, chiefly spread by salaried re- 
formers, is exciting the wonder of the civilized world. "What next 
tyranny?" is asked. Especially unjust and foolish is it to delay 
payment of the bonus to our soldiers, when duties on light beers 
and wines will furnish the millions of dollars without the sligh'est 
disturbance to taxation. Before long the people will speak in no 
uncertain tones on the subject. 



While no active steps are being 
Efficient Railroad Service Vital taken in the proposed purchase of 

the Market Street Railroad by the 
city, citizens are thinking seriously over the proposition. Something 
will have to be done to provide unity and efficiency of railroad 
service for our city, if we wish to see it go ahead. That we should 
allow it to go back is unthinkable. 

Excellent railroad service is vital to any city. One of the great 
advantages Los Angeles has possessed in attracting residents is its 
car service. We have not encouraged the establishment of excellent 
railways, but on the contrary have attempted to drive private roads 
out of business and into bankruptcy. We are paying the penalty 
of that Bolshevist policy which was carried on for many years. 

However we attain our object of bettering our railroad service in 
San Francisco, we must aim at unity in the plans to open up the 
city. To proceed on the theory that we had better wait until all the 
Market street franchises revert to the city and then proceed to unify 
our service, would be as bad as our old policy of ruining private 
railroads, so that the public ownership idea should take root. 

We must act sensibly like business people and not as demagogues, 
intent only on carrying elections. Our aim is to stimulate the growth 
and prosperity of our city, and it is high time we began the work 
of progress in service in a sensible fashion. 

If we can buy the Market s'reet system at an advantageous price, 
and pay for it as we go. we should do so and lose no time. Los 
Angeles advances by bounds while we hesitate. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1922 



I 



| 1 

m i A Versatile Statesman 

By Horace L. Leonard 

fgSaSS.ji««;a.W.a kj k gS.KS.SBsSS.8 * a a J 

T is doubtful whether there is any statesman who possesses such lives and intimate friends, and his delight is to play with them the 
a mastery of international affairs as Arthur Balfour, chief rep- oratorios of Handel to the accompaniment of those willing to fol- 



resentative of Great Britain in the Washington conference. Balfour, 
although well past the three-score years and ten, retains such phys- 
ical and intellectual vigor that it is difficult to realize that he is a 
godson of the great Duke of Wellington, between whom and the 
second Marchioness of Salisbury, thai is to say, Arthur Balfour's 
grandmother, a romantic attachment existed. 

Balfour's mother, the late Lady Blanche Balfour, was the favorite 
sister of the late Lord Salisbury, and was a most brilliant and 
charming woman. Arthur Balfour is the only surviving participant 
in the epoch-making International Congress of Berlin, under the 
presidency of Bismarck 



low him on one or both of his pianos. Both at his Carlton Garden 
house in London and at Wittinghame, his country seat in Scotland, 
the music rooms are equipped with a couple of grand pianos, and 
he is never so happy as when he can find some congenial spirit to 
play double duets with him. There is no statesman who is so pas- 
sionately fond of music or has such fine musical gifts as Balfour. 
For the first ten years of its existence the Handel Society of Eng- 
land held its meetings at Balfour's London house. The famous 
statesman has written a number of articles and even a book on 
Handel, of whose works he possesses a magnificent and unrivaled 
collection. A couple of volumes of Schumann are his constant 



All the time that Balfour can spare from his political duties in solace, and it was he who secured and paid for the publication of 

London, he spends at Wittinghame, the fine old family place at the "Book of Andreas Bach," a quaint volume of music, which was 

Lothian in Scotland, which formerly belonged to the House of written by Bernard Bach, when he was a pupil of the great Sebas- 

Douglas. It was there that James Douglas, Earl of Morton, plotted tian Bach, at Weimar, in 1715. Before the Great War, Balfour was 

with James Hepburn, Earl of Bothwell, and others for the murder one of the most constant attendants of the London Symphony Or- 

of Mary Queen of Scots' second husband, the Earl of Darnley, by chestra, did much for a time to promote the comprehension in 

blowing up with gunpowder the residence which he was occupying England of the works of Wagner, and made several pilgrimages to 

in the outskirts of Edinburgh. Baireuth. 

The first portion of their plotting took place in the tower of the . 



eld castle of Wittinghame, still in existence. But the conspirators 
became alarmed lest the walls of the tower should have ears and 
accordingly withdrew to a place of concealment within the branches 
of a great yew tree standing in the court yard. The branches of 
the yew formed an impenetrable screen, impervious to the light of 
day, and the gloom of this strange species of leafy cavern was so 
intense as to convince the plotters that there at least they were 
secure from evesdroppers. 

The Earl of Morton expiated the murder of Darnley on the scaf- 
fold at Edinburgh, where he was decapitated. Bothwell, instead of 
being executed, married Queen Mary, and after she had been be- 
trayed into the hands of the English for decapitation in Fo'heringay 
Castle, at the close of some years of captivity, turned pirate in the 
North Sea and in the Baltic. He was ultimately captured by the 
Danish authorities, and while his followers were put to death, he 
was left to die imprisoned in the dungeons of the Castle of Brags- 
holm. 

Arthur Balfour is one of the most expert players of golf in the 
United Kingdom. He has long been devoted to the game, in which 
he excels, and to which he is indebted for the retention of his 
health and physical elasticity. 

Germans have a sincere respect for the statesmanship and diplo- 
macy of Arthur Balfour and attribute much of his success to his 
devotion to golf. He has played with Woodrow Wilson, alike at 
Washington, in 1917, and in the outskirts of Paris in the spring of 
1919, while the Versailles Congress was in progress 

In versatility Balfour is almost unequalled as he adds music to 
his acquirements. He is founder of the Hendel Society of England. 
Strange to say, he is a virtuoso of rare skill on the concertina, as 
well as one of the finest amateur pianists. The concertina has 
always been looked upon in England as par excellence the musical 
instrument of the costermonger class. 

The idea of a statesman of such exceptional refinement, of so 
high an order of intellect, and of such a philosophic bent as Arthur 
Balfour being devoted to the concertina is, to say the least, unique. 
He always takes about with him when he travels four of these in- 
struments, which have been nick-named "the infernals" by his rela- 



GERMANY TO ESCAPE 

The recent speech of Lord Birkenhead, the British Chancellor, to 
the National Association of Manufacturers is referred to with high 
approval by British editors. It removes any doubts that the inten- 
tion is to allow Germany to escape from her load of reparations. 
In closing the Chancellor said: 

"It would be worth more than the trials of all the German crim- 
inals — although something has been done in that direction — if we 
could say that what German guns had destroyed should be made 
good by German goods and German money. 

"Therefore, speaking for myself, I say that the time has come 
when we must cease to be guided by preconceived pledges: I say 
that our most urgent duty is to re-create Europe. 

"It may be a very good thing to make your enemy pay for the 
damage he has committed, but it does not pay if you starve your 
own people in making him do it. 

"It is for us to gather up the salvage of Europe, and in order to 
do that you must come to an arrangement with France and with 
Germany. And you must also come to an arrangement with Russia 
as well. 

"But all these matters could be arranged as the result of an 
agreement between France, Germany and ourselves. And I state 
emphatically that the time has come for such an arrangement. 

"We have won glory enough for ourselves to last us and our 
sons, and our sons' sons, for ages to come." 



HOPE IS ETERNAL 

In a case which came before the Municipal Court in New York 
the other day. Dr. R. S. Dana Hubbard testified that all hair re- 
storers are practically worthless. He said: 

"Man keeps pouring money on his bald head and spends t:m: 
looking and hoping. The individual who buys some of these tonics 
in artistic colors and in attractive containers in order to relieve him- 
self of embarrassment due to loss of hair defrauds himself and 
wastes time and money. They are usually blattantly advertised to 
do the impossible." 



January 21. 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




effilHSHBaSISESKISffilB^ gg „,. 



Sacramental Grape Juice 



'w 



SlgSggSlieiillSIllgBllSS^ 



IN trying to limit the use of wine for sacramental purposes to 
unfermented grape juice the prohibition enforcers are getting 
near the end of their rope. There is no such thing as keeping 
fanatics within reasonable bounds. They would not be fanatics if 
they could be swayed by reason. 

The enforcers claim that there has been excessive indulgence in 
wine under the rules that Jewish rabbis can procure all the wine 
needed by their congregations for religious purposes. This has led 
to abuses, declare the enforcers. Why cannot grape juice be sub- 
stituted? To prevent any scandal arising, Louis Marshall, president 
of the American Jewish Committee, 171 Madison Avenue, New 
York, has suggested modifications of the enforcement rules. The 
responsibility of the rabbi would cease with his certification of the 
Federal Prohibition Director of the homes and addresses of mem- 
bers of his congregation. Government agents would then be respon- 
sible for the proper delivery of the wines. 

Admittedly, there would still be danger of dishonest and greedy 
prohibition agents who might join with wine dealers and evade the 
regulations, Mr. Marshall said. But no odium would then rest on 
the rabbi, as he would be relieved entirely of handling the wines. 
The present regulations, it was said, subject the rabbi to unjust 
suspicion because of alleged abuse by some rabbis and the far more 
general practice of "faking" rabbis and congregations. Mr. Mar- 
shall described the present method of procuring and distributing 
wines as "degrading and undignified." He said that other leading 
members of the Jewish faith are interested in seeing that rabbis 
are in no way linked with scandals growing out of the illegal han- 
dling of wines, according to a recent article in the New York Times. 

Under the amended regulations suggested by Mr. Marshall to offi- 
cials in Washington, the rabbi would be required to submit to the 
directors a certificate giving the names and addresses of each mem- 
ber of his congregation. This list would be placed on record in the 
director's office. Such safeguards as necessary would be incorpor- 
ated in the regulations to insure that only the persons whose names 
were certified by the rabbi could obtain the wines. Records show- 
ing this would be kept, both in the director's office and at the 
winery. Agents of the government would be required to check up 
on each name and see that the law had not been evaded. 

The possible use of unfermented grape juice for religious services 
has opened up the question whether fermented wines are required 
in religious observances by the Jewish people. Mr. Marshall was in 
favor of unfermented fruit juice, but remarked that he had never 
used either the fermented or the unfermented, as water answered 
the purpose. Mr. Marshall said he believed in allowing full freedom 
in such matters, however, and that no attempt should be made to 
force the use of unfermented wines upon those who believe that 
only fermented wines are valid. The committee working on the 
matter will report in about a month, Mr. Marshall said. 

Mr. Marshall was asked whether Congress would have the right 
under the Eighteenth Amendment to pass a law prohibiting the use 
of fermented wines in religious services, as reported under consid- 
eration here recently by prohibition officials. His answer was an 
emphatic "No." He added that Congress did not have this power, 
nor would any prohibition officials. 

The prohibition enforcers have not yet taken formal steps to have 
the Volstead act amended to compel the use of unfermented grape 
juice for sacramental purposes. To meet the exigencies of the deli- 
cate situation some manufacturers are working out chemical formu- 
las that will qualify unfermented grape juice to take the place of 



wine, without jarring the pious scruples of devout worshippers. 

But the devout churchmen are by no means satisfied with the 
chemical subterfuge. Very strong protests from leading churchmen 
have been received by the zealous Volsteaders, and the latter ap- 
pear to have stirred up a real hornets' nest. 

Some people ask if there is to be any limit to the absurdities of 
so-called prohibition. They want to rob the churchman of his sac- 
ramental wine and will not allow the popular use of wine or beer 
though the duty on them would furnish far more than the millions 
of bonus to the veterans who earned it in the Great War. Mixing 
public business and politics is bad enough, but tangling up public 
questions with fanaticism is ruinous. Common sense appears to be 
the most uncommon thing in the United States at present. 



A BUSY MAN 

Being a Premier is evidently no bed of roses, judging by the 
Manchester Guardian's description of the long day-and-night shift 
of Lloyd George (December 5 and 6). He worked incessantly for 
over twenty-two hours. 

"Rising at 5 o'clock on Monday morning he was in continual 
conference and business until nearly 4 o'clock the next morning. 
The only breaks were breakfast, over which business was talked, 
and tea, lunch, and dinner with the same accompaniment, ending 
up with a biscuit and a glass of lemonade some time during the 
night. He must have been very tired yesterday. 

"But he seems to be quite recovered today, and was certainly 
looking very well. During all that time the nervous strain must 
have been extreme, for up to II o'clock on Monday night there 
was no sign of agreement. But the Prime Minister went at the 
terms word by word and line by line to meet the Irish objections, 
and by 12:40 a. m. the first dawn of hope broke in. 

"After that things went much more rapidly, and at an acceler- 
ating rate the conference ran through to the final setllement. Agree- 
ment was reached at 2:20 a. m., and soon afterwards the Prime 
Minister was giving the terms to the King at Sandringham. 'And so 
to bed.' By 9:25 the same morning ihe King had sent his wire of 
congratulation." 



— The Drys have evidently decided to make their fight in Cali- 
fornia by newspaper propaganda, instead of direct war on the 
million or so of bootleggers. But they will lose the war just the 
same. As well try to keep out the flood tide with a broom as stop 
wine and beer. 



El'RIi 1" B'S F A M <> S W N H B It I. A S s 
\ MUtVKI.OlS \K.\V IWINTION 
» 



The "Binoculette' 



>■■ AiUihI 
fttae 




Actual 



\ rOMBINBD nl'l:K\ ami III I I) I.I IM I in t.r iMrriril in 
man'- » r-t parfcrt "r ln<ly'« pur-e. nml wcirli'- "til. 

1'svfvl Imlo.ir- <r lint. Krctilar Prlrr JMVOtl. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Optical Barpert sad bnportcn "■ Optical Specialties 

960 Market Street, brturrn Maoon nml T«vt.»r Mr. 

PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO MAI! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1922 




'Har&GxrllOtillr'Jmltli tlkxi T 

Ox Qiatwdl f&j the <k*il.str.*itb jm 



— The City and County Attorney has not yet collected the 
$40,000 which was donated to Golden Gate Park by the late Hon- 
ora Sharpe for a gate, but which has never gone into the funds of 
the park because Samuel G. Murphy, a former banker, has not 
turned the money over to the park commissioners. 

if. if. if. 

— Forty thousand dollars of public money would seem to be 
worth collecting. It might, anywhere else than in San Francisco, 
but the coin is taken so easily from our taxpayers that any bill 
which gives the city officials trouble is left for the waste basket. 

— The $40,000 which sticks to the pockets of former-Banker 
Murphy has been a long time overdue on collection. Soon it will 
be only a tradition. If that is the way the City and Coun'y Attor- 
ney's office looks after the legal claims of the city, one wonders 
what the City and County Attorney is paid for. 

— To understand the delay in paying the Honora Sharpe dona- 
tion into the currency, one has to begin at the beginning of the 
story. Honora Sharpe was the widow of one of San Francisco's 
best known lawyers. She desired to leave some of her estate for 
park improvements. To prevent any legal entanglements by heirs 
she gave a deed of trust to Samuel G. Murphy, who, it is under- 
stood, was to turn the money over to the Golden Gate Park Com- 
missioners after her death. Mr. Murphy has not turned over the 
money, though years have gone by. 

— Why has not the ex-banker delivered the money to the Golden 
Gate Park Commissioners? And why has not the City and County 
Attorney's office compelled Mr. Murphy to produce the money or a 
valid excuse for holding on to it? Other gentlemen, to whom the 
Widow Sharpe gave trust deeds transferring money to the Golden 
Gate Park Commissioners, have kept their trust. 

— It is reasonable to suppose that if proper pressure had been 
brought to bear on Mr. Murphy the ex-banker would also have dis- 
gorged. But he has not. The secretary of the park commissioners 
wrote various and sundry dunning letters to the ex-banker, but, 
receiving no satisfactory response, turned the collection of the debt 
over to the City and County Attorney's office. Still the money re- 
mains in the ex-banker's pocket, instead of appearing in the form 

of ornamental gates to the people's favorite pleasure ground. 
if. if. if. 

— Ex-Banker Murphy has left San Francisco, it is said, and has 
taken up his residence in New York. It may be that the claim 
against him has been outlawed, but it is hard to see how that could 
happen. An ex-banker, who cut some figure in local financial circles 
in his day in San Francisco, would hardly resort to the expedient 
of hiding behind a technical legal barrier to prevent prosecution 
for non-fulfillment of a sacred trust of $40,000. Forty thousand 
dollars is some money, but not forty millions should cause a man 
to pocket a donation left him in trust by a patriotic widow for the 
improvement of the people's chief playground. 
¥ ¥ •£ 

— Certainly the case is not one to be dismissed with a curt record 
on the back of the bill against ex-Banker Murphy, "uncollectable." 

— The City and County Attorney's office must furnish more facts 
than that to satisfy the public. That Honora Sharpe left the money 



in trust for the park is not to be denied. That all other moneys 
left by the widow for park improvements have been promptly paid 
is on record. Why has not ex-Banker Murphy discharged his trust 
in the same honorable fashion? 

— The widow did not intend that Mr. Murphy should pocket the 
money. If he thought that the money might not be judiciously ex- 
pended, that would be no excuse for hanging on to it. If the City 
and County Attorney's office had done its full duty, there would be 
no technicality for Trustee Murphy to dodge behind. The money 
left by the widow to our city would have been applied to the pur- 
pose which the donor intended. 

— It looks like a bad case for the trustee of the widow's mite, 
and not a very fine recommendation for the office of City and 
County Attorney. Well may it be asked, what is the City and 
County Attorney paid for? 



COAST SHIPPERS WILL SUFFER 

If the Interstate Commerce Commission denies the railroads the 
right to make transcontinental rates meeting water competition, 
coast shippers will suffer and so eventually will those in the interior 
through increased rates, is the statement made by G. W. Luce, 
freight traffic manager for the Southern Pacific Company in an 
address in San Francisco before the Pacific Freight Traffic Asso- 
ciation. 

Luce also touched on the inroads made in railroad business by 
motor trucks and au'o buses using free roadbeds or "tracks" built 
and maintained by the public. 

Luce pointed out that the Southern Pacific Lines with the other 
carriers have made application to the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission for permission to make rates to meet water competition 
between Atlantic and Pacific points, and that shippers in interior 
towns and cities have asserted that they will be compelled to pay 
higher freight rates than terminal points if the Interstate Commerce 
Commission grants the applications of the carriers. 

"This statement, taken by itself, may be true," said Luce, "but 
the freight rates which interior communities will be required to pay 
will be higher than they are today or ever before if the carriers 
are denied the privilege of making rates fairly meeting Canal rates. 
If the water service between the Atlantic seaboard and the Pacific 
Coast continues to increase and the transcontinental lines are pro- 
hibited from meeting the water rates, unless they make the same 
or lower rates to interior points (which they cannot afford to do 
unless water rates are sufficiently high) the traffic will move by 
water, and if the railroads must forego the revenue on that traffic 
it is quite evident they must increase the rates sufficiently on the 
only remaining traffic, which is that of the interior, to earn the 
necessary money to pay their bills." 



NEVER BURY THEIR DEAD 

The expedition to Thibet to scale Mount Everest finds strange 
customs amongst the natives. One of the oddest customs is that 
they never bury the dead. In each village you find a couple of men 
who are butchers. When a death occurs they are called in and cut 
up the body in small pieces, which are thrown to the birds. 

The people suffer a good deal from ophthalmia and cataract, 
owing to the wind and dust. They have, perhaps, one bath a year 
in the hot springs, which is generally taken just before the winter. 
The women smear their faces with grease and soot to protect the 
skin against the weather. The people practice polyandry. The wife 
of the eldest of three brothers, say, belongs also to the other two. 
If the second marries also, his wife belongs to him and the youngest 
brother. If the third weds he has his wife to himself. So it pays in 
Thibet to be a youngest son. The eldest is considered to be the 
father of all the children. 



January 21, 1922 AND CALIFORNIA 

THE RIOTING IN INDIA 



_|_ Bombay in connection with the arrival there of the Prince 
of Wales is bound to arouse questions as to the wisdom of those 
who advised the Prince to make a tour through India at this par- 
ticular moment," says the "Westminster Gazette." "It is under- 
stood, however, that the Viceroy himself was strongly in favor of 
the tour, and it is certainly too early yet to say that he was wrong. 
For Bombay is not India. Bombay is primarily an Eastern port, 
with all the characteristics of an Eastern port, including a 'rabble' 
which is only too ready at all times to lend a hand in any piece 
of violent mischief that may be afoot. 

"Let there be no mistake about it, the position in India today is 
more critical than at any time since 1857. The reverberations of 
the Amritsar massacre have shaken British rule to its foundations. 
In India, in Ireland and in Egypt it is the same story. The military- 
minded people have done everything possible to prevent any prac- 
tical solution of any of these problems. They believe in force, and 
they have sought to apply force; but one of the vital facts which 
they have overlooked is that Great Britain does not command 
enough force to go round. 

"The Irish question is now settled, mainly as a result of the 
obvious failure of force. 

"The Indian problem, however, is wholly different. There is no 
simple or obvious solution. Nothing is more certain than that India 
is not yet ready for complete self-government on democratic lines. 
On the whole, with the Montagu scheme, we have gone as far in 
the direction of providing for self-government as we can possibly 
go at the moment. And, in spite of the 'non-co-operation' propa- 
ganda, the new central Legislature at Delhi has been a conspicuous 
success. We have no course save to continue the experiment, and 
in the meantime to preserve order. Evacuation would be an act of 
cowardice and despair. But if we do not evacuate we must govern. 
In the long run, if the three hundred million people of India wish 
us to go we shall have to go, for it is impossible to coerce such 
numbers. But that is not the position yet. 

"We have accepted responsibilities in India which we cannot hon- 
orably abandon until we are forced. In the meantime we must pre- 
serve law and order, with as much firmness as we can command. 
There is, of course, a tremendous difference between firmness and 
the panic-stricken brutality of Amritsar, and that distinction is of 
the essence of the problem. Mr. Gandhi, it is reported, accepts 
responsibility for the Bombay riots. He deplores them, but he ad- 
mits that they are the logical outcome of his 'boycott' program. 
That is a very considerable admission, and if, as he has declared, 
he is unable to control the spirit of revolt which he has created, 
the British administration will have no alternative but to curtail his 
activities." 



GANDHI IN ENGLAND 

Professor Gilbert Murray, in his "Essays and Addresses," recalls 
the days when Gandhi was in England. 

"About the year 1889 a young Indian student, called Mohandar 
Karamchand Gandhi, came to England to study law. He was rich 
and clever, of a cultivated family, gentle and modest in his manner. 
He dressed and behaved like other people. There was nothing par- 
ticular about him to show that he had already taken a Jain vow to 
abstain from wine, from flesh, and from sexual intercourse. 

"When I met him in England, in 1914, he ate. I believe, only- 
rice and drank only water and slept on the floor; and his wife, who 
seemed to be his companion in everything, lived in the same way 
His conversation was that of a cultivated and well-read man, with 
a certain indefinable suggestion of saintliness.' 







tniMJJrtt 

jiiirJirlJ 




7 DAILY 
TRAINS 

to LOS ANGELES 



VIA COAST LINE 

(Third Street Station) 
LEAVE ARRIVE 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES 

8:00 a.m. Shore Line Limited 10:45 p. m. 

Scenic "Coast Line" by Day. 

5:00 p.m. Sunset Limited 7:45 a. m. 

Leave after Business Day is over — arrive for 
early morning engagements. 

8:00 p.m. Lark 9:30 a. m. 

Dine at home; sleep late; breakfast leisurely 
— arrive for 10 a. m. appointments. 

8:15 p.m. Sunset Express 12:05 p. m. 

A full night's rest and shorter day trip — 100 
miles along shore Pacific Ocean. 

VIA SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY LINE 

(Ferry Station) 
LEAVE ARRIVE 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES 

10:40 a.m. Los Angeles Express 7:40 a. m. 

Opportunity to see the wonderful development 
of San Joaquin Valley. 

4:00 p.m. Tehachapi 10:00 a. m. 

Leave after — arrive before banking hours. 
Crosses the scenic Tehachapi Mountains. 

6:00 p.m. Owl 8:50 a.m. 

Leave after Business Day — arrive for early 
morning engagement. 

PURCHASE PULLMAN SPACE EARLY 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC LINES 

For Fares and Sleeping Car Tickets Ask Agents 

50 Post Street Ferry Station Third St. Station 

or Phone Sutter 4000 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1922 



k'SaSSStsasEgilSggHKSEBHE^^ 



I Playing Politics ie Washrngtoim 



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THE call of Poslmaster General Hays to the movies was made 
a political matter by the Democrats in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. It is evident that the Democratic leaders at Washington 
think the political conditions are growing more favorable for their 
party. They intend to miss no opportunity that might prove of 
advantage to them. 

In the Senate Pat Harrison of Mississippi was the principal 
speaker on the movie offer to Postmaster General Hays, and dwelt 
on the fact that the movies selected Mr. Hays, not so much for his 
business talents as that he stood close to the leaders of the domi- 
nant party and was noted as a clever politician. The Congressional 
Record of January 7 contains his speech, in which he said amongst 
other things: » 

"If the United States Steel Corporation or the American Woolen 
Company should come to Washington and make an offer of one 
hundred or one hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year to one 
of the Cabinet members to direct its policies, and he should accept 
it, not only would the person accepting it be condemned, but the 
administration to which he belonged would be reprimanded. It was 
not long ago when the baseball trust, so to speak, invaded the 
bench and offered some fabulous sum to a judge to play the part 
of an arbiter and policy director. Now why is Mr. Hays selected 
by the motion picture industry to be its policy director, to receive 
therefor such a fabulous sum? What is the purpose of the hiotion 
picture industry in making him this tender and entering into a con- 
tract for that sum? 

"Is it because he is close to the powers that be? Is it because 
he has the ear of the President of the United States and sits in the 
family circle determining the administration policies? Is it because 
he helped to elect the Republican House of Representatives, whose 
duties it is to consider censorship legislation and to frame the tax 
and tariff laws? Is it because he played such a large part in the 
selection of Senators who control policies and pass legislation for 
the administration of this body? 

"I know not what influenced the motion picture industry, after 
scanning the whole country, to choose as the most qualified man for 
its head the Postmaster General. 

"It is not because of any exceptional ability along business lines 
that the Postmaster General may have shown in the past. It is not 
because they think he can exert more influence than anyone else in 
the United States in elevating the motion picture industry to a more 
higher standard of morals. No, Mr. President, those are not the 
reasons that have prompted the motion picture industry to make 
this very tempting offer to Mr. Hays. He came into prominence 
because of his qualifications as an organizer and astute poli'ician 
of rare force and energy. He is the "late chairman of the Repub- 
lican national committee; and it was under him that the Repub- 
licans obtained control of the House and Senate three years ago. 

"Mr. President, many questions come up in the Senate and in 
the House that affect the motion picture industry. It was only re- 
cently that the question of imposing a tax upon entrance into 
motion picture shows was discussed and acted upon in this body. 
That tax was removed. There is now before the finance committee 
cf the Senate the question of imposing a tariff or retaining a tariff 
upon films imported into this country. The Federal Trade Commis- 
sion is now threatening an investigation into some of the motion 
picture concerns. Is it because the motion pic'ure industry might 
have a weather eye out on that tariff proposition, or the Federal 
Trade Commission's investigation, that they think he might be in- 



fluential because of his closeness to certain Senators here or to 
Representatives in the other body, or to certain members of the 
Federal Trade Commission, or to the present President of the 
United States, that he is selected? 

"It is currently reported that we are going to have another tax 
bill. So many people, so many members here, are disgusted with 
the recent one that was passed that now they say we will have a 
supplemental tax bill; and the question of the imposition of taxes 
on the motion picture industry may come up in the consideration 
of that bill." 

Senator Sutherland of West Virginia interrupted by suggesting 
that the Democratic Senator might speculate why the movies took 
Wm. J. McAdoo out of the Treasury Department. He was the son- 
in-law of the then President of the United States. Senator Harrison 
replied : 

"I thought the Senator would ask that question. The Senator 
knows that Mr. McAdoo resigned the office of Secretary of the 
Treasury because he said that he could not make a living on the 
salary that was paid him. He had given some of his best years to 
the public service, and he felt it was his du'y to self and family to 
retire and practice his profession. It was after he had resigned as 
Secretary of the Treasury that the offer came to him as an attor- 
ney to represent four persons in the motion picture industry. I for- 
get those four — Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford and two 
others. This, however, is quite a different case. Mr. McAdoo had 
resigned as Secretary of the Treasury and had s'arted the practice 
of law when the offer came to him ; and he represented only four 
actors in the industry. 

"Here is a Cabinet member who now sits around the table advis- 
ing and promoting the policies of the administration, an ex-chairman 
of the Republican national committee, who is dickering with these 
motion picture industries to enter into a contract for $100,000 or 
$150,000, to represent not four actors or actresses in the industry 
but all the amalgamated interests of the motion picture industry. 
He is to be the head of every motion picture concern in the coun- 
try that belongs to the motion picture organization. His will will 
be the law, just the same as Judge Landis' will is now the law in 
baseball. He will direct the policies of the industry. 

"Mr. President, I believe that the motion picture people are tak- 
ing a very false step. They are deceived. Their movement is 
prompted by bad advice. If Mr. Hays wants to resign his place 
because of the small salary that is coming to him, in order to take 
this very remunerative offer, that is all right. That is a matter for 
Mr. Hays to decide; but when the motion picture industry attempts 
to procure as its head the biggest politician in the Republican party 
we on this side must look upon it with suspicion." 

Senator Harrison said more in the same strain, and the Senate 
switched off to discussion over the seating of Senator Newberry, 
which had been under way. The digression to score a political point 
on the acceptance of service with the movies by Pos'master Gen- 
eral Hays was chiefly of interest as showing how the political game 
is being played at Washington. 



— There isn't any talk here yet on the Washington rumor that 
Hoover friends are running the tape measure around his waist and 
asking if his wind is good enough for a Senatorial sprint against 
Hiram this year. 



January 21. 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



ONE MAN: ONE DAY: ONE BOTTLE 



WHEN you want liquor in Montreal, the thing is simple enough. 
You go out and wander around until you locate a store, on 
the screen in the window of which you read the words "Commission 
des Liqueurs de Quebec." You enter, lay your money upon the 
counter, receive your bottle and move on, to make way for the next 
in line. That one bottle is your day's supply. Having bought it, you 
are supposed to be content therewith until tomorrow. One Man : 
One Day: One Bottle — that's the law. 

You can beat the game and get more, of course. The commission 
has something like forty stores in the city. After you've bought one 
bottle you can hide that somewhere or give it away or drink it and 
then try some other store. There you buy another bottle and no 
questions asked. You don't have to take any oath that you haven't 
bought another bottle elsewhere that day. Lay down your money 
and you get your bottle. The Government of Quebec trusts you 
and, if you are so mean as to try to beat it, so much the worse for 
you. One bottle a day should be enough for any man. 

If you care to you can send your wife, providing she'll go, and 
she can get a bottle, too. But the number of women exercising 
their right to purchase liquor is noticeably small. 

It's good stuff, too, that you get. The commission tests it and 
guarantees it. Sometimes they don't have the particular brand you 
used to buy, but in that case they are certain to have a preparation 
of their own that is just as good. For example, they have a whisky 
that they simply label as "from Scotland." The salesman will assure 
you that this is the equal of the best Scotch to be had anywhere. 
There is no reason for him to tell anything but the truth about 
what he sells. The commission can afford to do things right. They 
sell good stuff and they get their own price for it. It is estimated 
that for its first year's business they will have sales of something 
like $25,000,000, with a profit of $5,000,000 and expenses of 
$1,000,000, leaving a balance to the Province of Quebec of $4.- 
000,000. Which is a very fair profit for any kind of concern to 
show for its first year's business. And everybody satisfied and con- 
tented, too, ordinarily. 

By law, the Quebec Liquor Commission may sell liquor between 
the hours of 9 and 6 on the days of the week from Monday to 
Friday and on the hours from 9 to 1 on Saturday. From I o'clock 
Saturday afternoon until 9 o'clock on Monday morning you can't 
get a thing. Even the drug stores don't sell it. If your doctor orders 
brandy for any sudden illness you have to wait until the commis- 
sion's store opens and then buy a full bottle. 

The stores that the commission hires to do business in are not 
large; some of them are of very moderate proportions indeed, con- 
sidering the business that they do. After space has been provided 
at the rear for a stock room, a counter erected and surmounted 
with a grillework with suitable openings, through which a customer 
may shove his money, shout the name of his favorite brand and 
receive his bottle, there remains very limited accommodations for 
customers. Especially for the crowd that assembles on Saturday 
mornings. 



DE VALERA'S STORY 

The new "Daily Mail" Year Book says of Valera : 
"His father was a Spanish artist who married a Limerick girl in 
New York. He was christened 'Edouardo' (which has been 'Irished' 
into 'Eamonn'). He was brought to Ireland when 2 years old. mar- 
ried a Dublin school teacher, and has six children, who all speak 
the old Irish language. 

"He was sentenced to penal servitude for life after Easter week. 
1916, released in 1917. arrested in 1918. and escaped from Lincoln 
Gaol in 1919, and went to the United States until last January" 



|*+*#+++**+*4i*4i4^i*4rtt«*iH>*+****+**4>*+****#4n|>* 



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♦ 
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♦ 
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■> 
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Established 1865 

Larkins 

Automobile 

Painting 



Buying a Larkins Paint Job is 

like buying good tires— you get 
more miles to the dollar. 

The durability of the Larkins 
Paint Job makes unnecessary 
the laying up of the car for paint- 
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Both time and money are saved. 



«S» 



Larkins & Co. 

First Avenue and Geary Street 
San Francisco 

Makers of the Larkins Top 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1922 




ociot 




Busy Cupid 

MISS OLIVIA ERDMAN, daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. J. M. Erdman of New 
York, has announced her engagement to 
John K. Kuser of Bordentown, N. J. The 
wedding will take place in June. Miss Erd- 
man visited here some time ago as the guest 
of Miss Marie Louise Baldwin at the Wil- 
liam Sproule home. She is well known in 
society in New York. Her father is one of 
the eminent medical men in America, being 
an authority on brain diseases. Miss Bald- 
win will go east for the wedding this sum- 
mer and has been chosen as maid of honor. 
The Erdman family is well known in finance, 
society and other affairs in New York and 
New Jersey. The famous Lennox potteries 
are owned by the Erdmans. Young Kuser 
is a graduate of Princeton University. 

— Announcement has been made in South- 
ern California of the engagement of Miss 
Clara Frosio of Coronado and Victor Hay 
Chapman, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Hay 
Chapman of San Francisco, the former of 
whom is editor of Golf and Motor. The 
wedding will take place on April 20 and 
after a honeymoon in Yosemite, Chapman 
and his bride will make their home in Santa 
Barbara. 

— The engagement is announced of Miss 
Amelia Escobar and Captain Ernest K. 
Stratton. Miss Escobar is a member of a 
prominent Salvador family and is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Francesco Escobar. She 
was educated at the Sacred Heart Convent 
at Menlo Park and finished her schooling 
in Paris. Captain Stratton is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Benjamin Stratton of Washington, 
D. C. He served overseas during the world 
war. The wedding will take place as soon 
as Captain Stratton arrives in Salvador, to 
which place he is now en route. 

— The wedding of Miss Avis Hughes, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rupert Hughes, 
and John Monk Saunders of Washington, 
D. C, took place on Sunday in Coronado, 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Creel. 
The ceremony was performed by the Rev. 
Percy Stickney. Miss Elizabeth Cobb, the 
daughter of Irvin Cobb, was the maid of 
honor, and Churchill Peters, former Yale 
football player, was the best man. Mr. 
Saunders has just returned from Oxford, 
where he was a Rhodes scholar. The bride 
is well known in California, and visited her 
aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. John Hughes, 
on their private yacht in Coronado last 
summer. 



Luncheons 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Clark enter- 
tained at a luncheon at their home in San 
Mateo on Sunday, having about thirty of 
their friends who motored over for the pony 
races held on Clark field in the afternoon. 
A polo game followed the match races, 
when Miss Katherine Kuhn's "Oh Boy" de- 
feated Archibald Johnson's "Steamer Day." 
Among the guests at the Clark luncheon was 
Vice Admiral Sir William Pakenham of H. 
M. S. Raleigh, the British cruiser, now in 
port, and a group of the officers of his staff. 

— General and Mrs. George Barnett, U. 
S. M. C, who sailed for Honolulu, were 
guests of honor at a handsome luncheon 
which Mrs. Sydney Cloman gave at the Bur- 
lingame Country Club Sunday afternoon. 

— One of the pretty affairs given at The 
Fairmont the past week was the bridge- 
luncheon at which Mrs. William Hart Wood 
was hostess, complimenting Mrs. Samuel 
Perkins, who has recently come from Ta- 
coma to spend the winter in Piedmont, 
where her children are attending school. 

— Mrs. Frank W. Fuller, who with her 
family will leave next month for Europe, 
was guest of honor at a luncheon given 
recently by Mrs. Wyatt Hamilton Allen. The 
affair took place in the Allen apartments at 
Stanford Court. 

— Mrs. Edgar Peixotto entertained at a 
luncheon and bridge at her home on Wash- 
ington street. 

— The luncheon and bridge party given 
by Miss Dolly Madison Payne on Saturday, 
January 14, in honor of Miss Ruth Lent, 
who will be the bride of Herman Leonard 
Underhill on February 9, was the delightful 
event of the week. The affair was given in 
the Venetian room at The Fairmont. The 
oval table at which the charming bevy of 
girls were seated was artistically decorated 
with a profusion of violets, pink roses and 
ferns. After luncheon, bridge was enjoyed 
for the remainder of the afternoon. 

Teas 

— Complimenting Madame S. Yada, wife 
of the consul general of Japan, Mrs. R. T. 
Harding entertained at tea in palm court 
at the Palace Hotel on Saturday. 

— In honor of Miss Ruth Lent, whose 
wedding to Hermon Leonard Underhill will 
take place at the Eugene Lent home Feb- 
ruary 9, Mrs. Charles Warren Hunt enter- 
tained informally at tea at her home Friday 
afternoon. 



— In honor of the junior officers of the 
visiting British cruiser Raleigh, Miss Cornelia 
Gwynn entertained at tea at her home on 
Jackson street on Sunday afternoon. 

— Miss Gladys Waterhouse will be hostess 
at a large tea on Saturday, February 4, in 
honor of Miss Lucile Bergerot, whose en- 
gagement to H. Alton Collins was announced 
not long ago. 

— The Misses Helen and Claire Stringer 
gave a tea Monday as a farewell compli- 
ment to Miss Katherine Masten and Miss 
Helen Perkins, who left Wednesday for 
Honolulu. 

Dancing Parties 

—Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent (Maud 
Bourn), who left here as a bride to make 
her home at Killarney, Ireland, several years 
ago, gave a most enjoyable afternoon at 
the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam B. Bourn, in San Mateo, Monday, en- 
tertaining the young matrons with whom she 
had been a belle and their small sons and 
daughters. The party was in honor of Miss 
Elizabeth Vincent, the small daughter of 
the hostess, whose birthday was celebrated. 
The affair was a miniature Mardi Gras, the 
tiny guests being dolled up in all manner 
of fancy costumes, over a hundred children 
participating in the affair. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hooper will give 
a dancing party at their home on Saturday 
evening, January 21. 

Dinners 

— George H. Lent was host to the Har- 
vard Club at an elaborate dinner party at 
the St. Francis Hotel ballroom on Monday 
night. About 200 members of the club and 
a few visiting friends were entertained. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Martin were 
hosts at an informal dinner at their home 
down the peninsula on Sunday evening. The 
guests included a group of the young people 
who were down for the Scott party. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John Drum gave a dinner 
Saturday evening at their home in Burlin- 




«8" 



"oAll that the J^ame 



Impli 



tes 



» 



Pioneer Motor Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



January 21, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



game and had for guests Mr. and Mrs. Ger- 
ald Rathbone, Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler 
Curran, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Welch, Mrs. 
William F. Fullam, Mr. and Mrs. George 
Newhall, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Scott and Mr. 
Georges Romanovsky. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Johnson were 
hosts at an interesting dinner Thursday, 
when they entertained a small group of 
friends from both sides of the bay in the 
Rose room bowl of the Palace Hotel. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowery as- 
sembled a group of their friends at dinner 
at their home on Friday evening before the 
ball which Miss Jennie Blair gave at the 
Fairmont Hotel for Miss Helene de Latour. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Horsley Scott gave a 
dinner on that evening for their niece, Miss 
Mary Martin. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Rennie T. Schwerin en- 
tertained a group of friends at an informal 
dinner preceding the Scott ball on Saturday 
evening. Covers were placed for the mem- 
bers of the house party who returned from 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vin- 
cent at Pebble Beach. The guests were: 
Messrs. and Mesdames Walter Hobart, Law- 
rence McCreery, Samuel F. B. Morse and 
Arthur Hill Vincent. 

Dinner-Dances 

— Mr. and Mrs. George McGowan gave a 
dinner-dance party at the Fairmont Hotel 
on Saturday in honor of Miss Virginia Deal, 
whose birthday was celebrated. Also in the 
party were: Colonel and Mrs. Mortimer 
Bigelow, Colonel and Mrs. W. A. Trumbull. 
Colonel and Mrs. Osmun Latrobe, Colonel 
and Mrs. George Winterby, Messrs. Rene 
Bennett, Robert Knight and Homer Collins. 

Balls 

— The group of women who will manage 
the Mardi Gras ball met Monday at the 
Hotel St. Francis to discuss the details of 
the affair. The ball is to be given at the 
Auditorium on February 28. The queen will 
be chosen by popular vote. Mrs. Augustus 



Not conspicuous — 

one of the many Features "f tii«- nerc 
less "i lolonl il lenses "' lolonlal" 
are semi-lnvistble, attractive In appear- 
ance, distinctive In ■!■ sii.-ii and optically 
rapidly displacing 
the old types of conspicuous eyeglasses 
and rrami a 



W. I>. Kcimlmorr 



A. R. Frnnlnlorr 



J. M . I>.|>U 




Saa KmnH.cn - i H l Put, ;.">ii» Mlosloa St*. 

Berkeley - - - - '» IO(l slinttnck Avenue 
Onklami - 1MI Broadway 



Taylor is chairman. Following the business 
session all of the committee remained for 
luncheon at the hotel. 

In Town and Out 

—Mr. and Mrs. Alfred de Ropp (Olivia 
Pillsbury) are here from Wilmington, Del., 
visiting Horace D. Pillsbury at the Pillsbury 
home on Pacific avenue. 

— Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Savage are leaving 
toward the last of this month for New York, 
en route to Cairo and other places of inter- 
est along the Mediterranean coast. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Sproule and 
Miss Marie Louise Baldwin, who have been 
in New York, have returned to their home 
in town. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Hudnut, who 
returned to their home on California street 
just before the holidays, will leave in March 
for Europe, and will make their permanent 
home on the Riviera. 

— Mrs. Baldwin Wood and little daughter, 
Miss Gloria Wood, are en route to Washing- 
ton, where they will visit for several days 
with Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Hyde-Smith. 
They left San Mateo Saturday and follow- 
ing the brief sojourn in the national capital 
they will proceed to New York to await the 
sailing of their steamer early in February. 
Mrs. Wood and her daughter are going first 
to France, where they will be until the sum- 
mer, when they will enjoy a short trip 
through Italy. 

— Miss Sophie Beylard returned home on 
Sunday after a visit of several months in 
Europe. She has reopened her home in El 
Camino Real, San Mateo. Mr. Beylard did 
not return with his daughter, but will join 
her the first week in February. He is enjoy- 
ing ihe intervening weeks with relatives in 
Boston. 

— A cordial welcome is being extended to 
General and Mrs. Joseph M. Kuhn, who 
arrived Saturday from Honolulu to enjoy 
several weeks' vacation here. General and 
Mrs. Kuhn have taken apartments at the 
Hotel Steward for the period of their stay 
in San Francisco. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Schlacks of 
New York, who have recently returned from 
a lour of Europe, have just arrived in the 
city from New York and are domiciled at 
The Fairmont, where they expect to remain 
for several months. 

— Miss Lawton Filer, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter G. Filer, will return on Friday 
after a fortnight's visit in the East. 
Intimations 
— Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Masten were 
in an automobile accident on Sunday, their 
machine being completely demolished in a 
collision with another car. Happily neither 
occupant was seriously hurt. 

— Miss Lucia Chase of Washington, D. C. 
who came West with Mrs. George Barnett, 



was a week-end guest at the Cloman home 
in Burlingame and attended the Henry T. 
Scott ball on Saturday evening. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Horatio Livermore, who 
have been abroad for the past year, will 
return to California on or about February 
15. Mr. and Mrs. William J. O'Donnell of 
New Orleans, who have had the Livermore 
house on Russian Hill since their arrival 
from the South, have taken the William 
Palmer Lucas residence on Steiner street 
and Broadway for the rest of the winter 
season. 

— Mrs. Ethyl Hager will leave for New 
York and Europe in March. She will go 
directly to Paris and will spend the spring 
and early summer there. A group of inti- 
mate friends who will be in Paris together 
during part of Mrs. Hager's stay is com- 
posed of the Misses Maud and Ella O'Con- 
nor, Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron, Mrs. 
James V. Coleman and Mrs. Ferdinand 
Thieriot. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



CALIFORNIA PACIFIC TITLE 
INSURANCE CO. 

announces the opening of its new 
home. Title Insurance Building, and 
invites its friends and customers to 
visit the new and unusual building. 

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At Bush Street 

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Hotel Del Monte 

Make Sou Bun i latjunn 
ii ( ity Book lag Office 
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PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

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JEWELS In Platinum 

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EXPERT 



Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21 , 1922 





l£INANCIAl^ 

By P. N. BERINGER 




Business has received a great forward 
impetus, through the progress made by the 
arms pailey and the advance of the eco- 
nomic conference toward a solution of vari- 
ous difficulties. The Irish peace, and the 
turn over of the government to the provis- 
ional government of Ireland, has also had a 
most salutary effect on business relations the 
world over. The Briand resignation came 
like a bolt from the blue, but the bad ef- 
fects are not as yet to be seen. It may be 
taken for granted that most of these bad 
effects find residence in the imagination of 
the daily newspaper economists. The new 
French ministry is not going to upset things 
and it is more than likely that the Lloyd 
George-Briand agreement will be adopted, 
with but slight modifications. France insis's 
on the Germans making their payments in 
full, and when due, and it is to be expected 
that the parties to the economic conference, 
and those who are engaged in the arms par- 
ley, will fall in line with the desires of 
France. 

S£ %. 3& 

Germany is not as bad off as she would 
have the world believe, and the French have 
first-hand and reliable information as to Ger- 
many's real condition. That is why France 
is so insistent on having the payments made 
when they are due. The project the French 
have in mind is the occupancy of a greater 
part of Germany than is now held, if the 
payments are not promptly made when due. 
It will be noted that when a payment has 
been about due there has been the same 
cry of inability to pay on the part of Ger- 
many, but that, when payment was insis'.ed 
upon, payment has been made. The French 
insist that Germany has by no means ex- 
hausted the possibility of further taxing her 
people. 

* * * 

There is a text which should find publica- 
tion everywhere in this country and which 
should find a place on all of the billboards 
and in all of the newspapers of the inferior 
cities of the United States. This text should 
read to the effect: "We are now producing 
and we are manufacturing more than we 
can consume. If the markets of the world 
are closed to us, then those who produce in 
ihe fields, who work in the factories, must 
be thrown out of employment. Therefore, 
we must keep these markets open and adopt 
a conciliatory and reciprocative policy. If 



we shut our door to our neighbor's products 
and manufactures, we must expect that our 
neighbor will close his door to our products 
and our manufactures. If we adopt tariffs 
which prove effectual embargoes on the im- 
portation of raw and finished materials, we 
close the door of opportunity for our pro- 
ducers of raw materials and manufactured 
products in the countries against which the 
tariff is directed. The immediate effect of a 
high tariff is to raise the price of goods in 
this country at retail. It is always the con- 
sumer who pays the tax, and the country 
does not receive a benefit that is sufficiently 
large to offset this direct tax on the people." 

In India there is a war cloud and a hint 
of a real revolution. So far, although the 
daily newspapers make the statement that 
Great Britain is hiding something and cam- 
ouflaging the real news, there has been a 
boycott on English-Manchester-made cotton 
goods, and this boycott may be extended to 
other commodities which India claims can 
be made in India. In addition the followers 
of Ghandi have made a passive resistance 
to a support of the government, and this 
and the boycott are only part of closely 
linked policy. The cry is "India for the 
Indians," and there is, of course, no telling 
just how far this may lead or how this 
movement may grow. But it isn't war, as 
yet. 

Of course, any discussion of conditions 
and any impairment of political and busi- 
ness relations must bring about a certain 
amount of dislocation elsewhere, and, in this 
instance, the Indian movement has had its 
immediate effect in the big industrial centers 
of the tight little English island. 
* * * 

Shipping — There are more than 1 000 
Shipping Board vessels idle. This means 
steel vessels. In addition there are 263 
wooden vessels tied up. 

The volume of imports into the United 
States has increased markedly since August. 
On the other hand, exports have fallen off. 
The net increase in the total of our October 
trade was about 19,000 long tons. 

Mr. Cantelow, formerly of the Pacific 
Steamship Company at Seattle, is now the 
executive head of the Luckenbach Steam- 



ship Company at San Francisco. Mr. Zach 
George, formerly traffic manager for J. K. 
Armsby Company, and before that with the 
Santa Fe Railroad, is Mr. Can'.elow's assist- 
ant manager. In about ten days the two 
will have assumed full swing of affairs in 
the big and busy office in the Merchants 
Exchange. 

Insurance — There now seems to be every 
probability that those who lost through the 
welching of the big German insurance com- 
panies, after the big fire, will eventually get 
part or all of their money on proper proof 
of loss. The bills by Senator Johnson and 
Congressman Kahn provide for the using of 
the money now in the hands of the Alien 
Property Custodian to that purpose. The 
latest champion for the insured is Clarence 
M. Oddie. 

As business improves, so does the great 
protecting factor in business, insurance, im- 
prove. The report at all of the agencies is 
that conditions are bettering themselves very 
slowly. More liberal advertising would help 
things along more quickly. 
q: sp sfi 

Mining — From Virginia City comes the re- 
port that Eastern people will spend $150,- 
000 to extend drifts and tunnels to explore 
the Bullion, Best & Belcher, Chollar, Gould 
& Curry, Potosi and Savage mines. A pow- 
erful compressor and other machinery to 
cost in the aggregate $130,000 will be in- 
stalled. 

The Gold Canyon Dredging Company will 
dredge the extensive area near Dayton. 

Tonopah district shows improved produc- 
tion. Normal production has been restored 
in the Belmont, West End, Extension and 
Tonopah mines. The Montana, Jim Butler 
and other properties are shipping steadily. 
Nineteen-twenty-two opens up with a prom- 
ise of being a wonder year in Nevada min- 
ing. 

In California the old camp of Rough & 
Ready seems to be returning to the pros- 
perity of its early history. 

•if * * 
As predicted in this column. Grass Valley 
has been revitalized and the group of New 
York capitalists is going to make things 
hum in the old mining town. The latest de- 
velopment is the purchase of the Nnram- 
bagua mines. Ownership of the Banner 
property has changed hands and approxi- 
mately $175,000 is said to have been given 
for this. The recent combinations and pur- 
chases in Grass Valley ensure a year of 
activity. 



January 21, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



'h „ ^fftomobjh 




TO STOP MOTOR THEFTS 

A SYSTEM of numbering automobile en- 
gines has been worked out by the 
Standards Committee of the Society of 
Automobile Engineers. It is regarded as the 
simplest, most effective and prac'ical method 
of its kind for protection against motor car 
thefts which has yet been devised. 

The engine identification number shall be 
placed near the top of the right hand side 
of the crank case proper, in a position in 
which it can be read easily. It shall be be- 
tween two vertical ribs or beads one-fourth 
inch wide, one-eighlh inch high, three inches 
long and three inches apart. The surface of 
the casting between the ribs shall be left 
rough as cast and unpainted even on the 
finished car. 

The numbers shall be evenly stamped in 
the casting 1 /32 inch deep and shall be 
cne-fourlh inch high and of script form. The 
first digit shall be stamped close to the left 
hand rib and the last digit shall be followed 
by a large star or other character to prevent 
adding digits. A star or other character shall 
be stamped immediately above and below 
each number to prevent adding another 
number. The numbers shall be stamped 
twice on each casting to prevent correcting 
any errors made in stamping either number. 

It is stated that a 7'/2 P er cent reduction 
in theft insurance premiums will result if 
this me'hod of numbering engines is ap- 
proved for fu'.ure passenger car models. 



Expert Review of the Trade 

It is the opinion of Charles Clifton, presi- 
dent of the National Automobile Chamber 
of Commerce, that the production of 1921 
probably will not be exceeded in 1922, but 
this is only one particular in (he scope of 
motor transportation. 

Mere attention will be paid to the needs 
of the individual owner. The repair parts 
business of the factories will be better or- 
ganized. Governmental and other agencies 
will carry on studies of transportation costs 
which will affect owner economies. Road de- 
velopment will give the motorist more value 
per vehicle. The export market will be bet- 
ter. In fact, if the Allied debt is refunded, 
foreign trade will be measurably improved 
as the exchange rate will then readjust dif- 
ferences in currencies on a basis of com- 
parative purchasing power. 



Improvement in export trade became no- 
ticeable in October. In the months preceding 
there had been a halting of demand in for- 
eign markets as a direct result of the dis- 
turbed economic conditions throughout the 
world. The lowest level for automotive ex- 
port in 1921 was reached in July as far as 
commercial trucks were concerned and in 
September for passenger cars. Compared 
with July, the truck shipments were higher 
by 76 per cent in October. The percentage 
of increase in case of passenger cars was 
6 per cent over the September exports. A 
still greater improvement was noticed by the 
trade during November. Thus it is becoming 
evident that the curve of export trade has 
turned the corner and is now gradually di- 
rected upward. 



INCOME TAX SPECIALIST 

Nearly a generation ago a young man 
was employed on this publication for a con- 
siderable period of time. Later he drifted 
into more general newspaper work, and sub- 
sequently became quite conspicuous in civic 
and political affairs. That man was Justus 
S. Wardell. 

He held several offices of prominence; 
was well and favorably known as collector 
of internal revenue,' and at the close of 
1920 retired from official life and began the 
work of specializing in the practice of in- 
ternal revenue laws. 

After a year's activities under his own 
name, he announces that he has associated 
with himself Mr. Thomas F. Feeney and 
Mr. Ronald E. Kaehler, under the firm name 
of Wardell. Feeney c< Kaehler. These two 
young men have been in business with Mr. 
Wardell ever since he has been engaged in 
private activities, and have a very high 
standing as specialists in income tax mat- 
ters. Problems of this character are among 
the serious questions of the day, and a firm 
which can solve them with certainty and 
accuracy is more than a business conven- 
ience: it is indispensable. 



Irate Golfer — You must take your chil- 
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place for them. 

Mother — Now don't you worry — they 
can't ear nothin' new — their father was a 
sergeant-major, e was!" — London Opinion. 





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16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21 , 1922 




PlyEASURE/S WAND 



"The Net" at Alcazar 

Maravene Thompson's play, "The Net," 
is woven around the unusual situation of a 
young man after a blow on the head losing 
his memory and being arrested for the mur- 
der of the artist into whose studio he stum- 
bles in a state of partial unconsciousness. 
The part of this interesting stranger is 
played in a masterly manner by Dudley 
Ayres, and Gladys George has the role of 
the wife of the real murderer. The play is 
charged with intense interest, both psycho- 
logical and dramatic, with just enough fun 
sprinkled about to prevent anything like 
gloom. Ben Erway has a congenial role and 
manages to keep us from forgetting in these 
days of drought what a jag looks like. A 
serious and dignified doctor is portrayed by 
Charles Yule, and again he demonstrates his 
versatility. Ned Doyle, genuine comedian, 
creates most of the laughs in the piece as 
the doctor's assistant. Laura Lee made a 
most decided hit as the artist's model, and 
little Lucille Shirpser was true to the tradi- 
tions of that exotic creature, the Stage Child. 



California 

Pauline Frederick maintains her reputa- 
tion by her work in "The Lure of Jade," 
ably supported by Thomas Holding. Very 
tragic, this film furnishes Miss Frederick 
with a suitable role. Harold Lloyd's comedy 
furnished a sure cure for blues. Heller has 
a pleasing program this week. 



Tragedy at Granada 

Tragedy seems to be the prevailing note 
in the week's moving pictures. Lionel Bar- 
rymore heads the list with his sorrowful 
characterization of a reformed gangster in 
"Boomerang Bill," a film with a strong 
moral, a goodly mixture of pathos and a 
bit of finished acting. Severi was ill on our 
particular evening, but the music was of a 
high order and Wallace gave a pleasant 
paraphrasing of Rubenstein's "Melody in F." 



May Robson at Columbia 

The annual visit of May Robson in a 
characteristic comedy to the Columbia Thea- 
ter was rapturously greeted by a large and 
friendly audience. They said it in flowers 
and in prolonged applause. And Miss Rob- 
son, hand on heart, assured them that it 
was one of her happiest moments. Then the 
play went on — "It Pays to Smile," a Nina 
Wilcox Putnam story, dramatized by Ethel 
Watts Mumford especially for Miss Robson 
— three clever women on the job! There is 
a noticeable lack of concordance here. For 
instance, the dramatist designs an old lady 
of exquisite New England refinement and 
culture trying to adapt herself to the comi- 
cal crudities of the Californians; whereas 
the actress depicts an old lady full of cheer- 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

ful guile and suppressed swear-words, ple- 
bian humor and affability, trying to impress 
woolly Westerners with the "innate gentle- 
ness of the real old Boston aristocrat." Miss 
Robson, in the role of Miss Freedom Talbot, 
is her happy and humorous self, and is sur- 
rounded by a capable company. Notable 
among these are Russell Hicks, who plays 
an Italian Duke under impossible circum- 
stances, and Margaret Borough, the breezy 
California girl. Edith is agreeable in the 
role of an American Countess, and Henry 
Crosby looks the part of the rancher. The 
play is full of laughs and amusing situations 
and serves to present Miss Robson's popular 
personality to her many admirers. 




Furore of Fun at Orpheum 

"Monkey see, monkey do," and monkey's 
doing is ever so much funnier than man's. 
Perhaps in Tarzan's case it is all a matter 
of [raining, but the way this clever chim- 
panzee, whom Felix Patty has so wonder- 
fully educated, executes his practical jokes 
would indicate that he has a strong personal 
sense of humor. His antics kept the Or- 
pheum audience in shouts of laughter. 

Lillian Shaw has some new and amusing 
impersonations. She is exceptionally clever. 
Clark, Bergman, the Dale Sisters, Bobby 
Roth and a confederate in one of the upper 
boxes put a mighty good one over on all of 
us, and Morris and Campbell made an in- 
stant comedy hit with their songs and 
dances. Estelle Collette and William Demar- 
est, artists in their own particular class, have 
a good music and comedy act. Sallie Fisher 
remains for anolher popular week in "The 
Choir Rehearsal." 

Sequoia Little Theater 

Willard Moore, the well-known musician 
and composer of songs, will have charge of 
the musical programs of the Sequoia play- 
ers and is organizing a string orchestra for 
the bi-weekly performances at the Little 
Theater, 1 725 Washington street. 

The program consists of three one-act 
plays, all bearing the note "first time in San 
Francisco," and all are by American writers. 
The plays, which will be continued every 
Tuesday and Saturday night during Jan- 
uary, are "The Bowery," a strictly American 
interlude by James Bugge; "The Altar Can- 
dle," a Yale University prize play by Theo- 
dore Banks Jr., and "The Shepherd in the 
Distance," an Oriental pantomime by Hol- 
land Hudson. 



Dinner-Dances at Fairmont 

Society is much interested in the dinner- 
dances at the Fairmont Hotel from 7 to 12 
on Saturday nights. The tariff, $1.75, would 
be astonishingly low if there were a cover 
charge, but there is none. The music is de- 



lightful, the surroundings ideal and the 
series of such dances is an event. 



Alcazar Next Week 

Patrons of the Alcazar Theater will find 
a delicious treat in store with the production 
beginning Sunday afternoon, January 22, of 
"The Beautiful Liar." This delightful play 
was first presented at the Princess Theater, 
New York, under the title of "Mrs. Jimmy 
Thompson." The heroine of the piece is a 
sort of Cinderella typist and the locale is 
laid in one of those remarkable boarding 
houses where anybody's business is every- 
body's, and where many interesting char- 
acter types are likely to be found. Gladys 
George will be seen as a young woman who 
is the center of attraction in the modest 
boarding house, and Dudley Ayres will have 
the principal role playing opposite to her. 
Anne Berryman, a talented young actress, 
will make her first appearance wi'h the Al- 
cazar players in this production. 



Orpheum's Next Bill 
Eddie Buzzell will be amongst the favor- 
ites to appear in next week's bill at the 
Orpheum. He will present his successful 
sketch, "A Man of Affairs." Nat Nazarro 
will demonstrate that he stands at the very 
head of his profession of gymnastics. Cliff 
Nazarro and the Darling Sisters will prove 
that they compose vaudeville's cleverest juv- 
eniles. Beatrice Sweeney will appear in a 
daring trapeze act. Fink's mules will dis- 
prove the belief that mules are obstinate 
and stupid. The clown-mule, "Jim Dump," 
cannot be ridden by a human being. Clark 
and Bergman, Lillian Shaw and Flo Camp- 
bell and Jos Morris will remain for another 
week. 



The Pacific Players will give "Sunset," 
by Jerome K. Jerome, and "Getting Unmar- 



SAM FRAIK1SCO 



m NAUOt*\u.fc 




i 



MA ™* ES 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays nnd 

Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



January 21, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



ried," by Winthrop Parkhurst, the evenings 
of January 23 and 25 at Sorosis Hall. The 
performances will be under the direction of 
Nathaniel Anderson. 



Star System Fatal to Shakespeare 

"The star system has done more to kill 
Shakespeare than any other influence I 
know. Shakespeare has hardly ever been 
played, really played, within the memory of 
men now living," said Louis Calvert, actor- 
manager, producer of twenty-six plays of 
Shakespeare. 

"Sothern and Marlowe, you may say. No. 
They play the star game. They do little 
with the small parts. They are part of this 
star system which has done so much to kill 
Shakespeare. 

"Take 'Romeo and Juliet.' As played to- 
day, when Romeo and Juliet die the curtain 
is rung down. That's all there is to the play, 
as far as the stars are concerned, so why 
not end it there? But is that where Shake- 
speare ended the play? Of course not. 

"There is the pitiful scene of agony en- 
dured by Capulet and Montague on hearing 
of the tale of Romeo and Juliet, and then 
their realization that it is through their own 
selfish pride that their loved ones have met 
death, their realization mounting to fulfill- 
ment in the exclamation of Capulet, '0 
brother Montague! give me thy hand.' 

"To produce 'Romeo and Juliet' properly 
real artists must play Montague and Capu- 
let. But the star system has room — and 
money — for none but the stars. They say it 
doesn't pay to select actors of shining abil- 
ity to play the small parts. 

"This business of cutting scenes in Shake- 
speare is a grave mistake. So many stars 
feel that they can improve on Shakespeare 
by cutting, particularly by omitting the final 
scenes in the tragedies. Producing Shake- 
speare in this way is simply cheating the 
public out of one of the most wonderful 
points in Shakespeare's art. Always at the 
end of the tragedy there is the philosophy 
that no matter what disaster may overtake 
mortal man, though death overtake him, life 
after all goes on. 

"It is safe to say that Shakespeare never 
wrote a scene for the sake of writing. He 
was a great craftsman and knew what he 
was doing. So many people have judged 
scenes superfluous when a little study would 
show that they were important to the devel- 
opment of Shakespeare's idea. 

"A star in a play by Shakespeare gives 
eight performances a week, either of the 
same role or of several parts. It's impossible 
for a man to give eight performances a 
week of big parts in Shakespeare. The parts 
take too much out of him. He must have 
plenty of rest to recruit his energies. By 
giving eight performances he merely gives 
one-eighth of himself. Four performances a 
week is the most any actor should give of 



an important Shakespearean role. As for 
turning from 'Macbeth' one day to 'Shylock' 
the next and 'Hamlet' the following day, 
that is impossible, if a man is to do his best 
by the public." 



Sport at Del Monte 

Word has been received from George 
Moore that he will enter a strong polo four 
for the opening tournament of the Califor- 
nia season at Del Monte on January 28 to 
February 5. 

Carleton Burke, captain of the champion 
Midwick team of last season, has promised 
to come up to the tournament with Arthur 
Perkins, and possibly Teddy Miller. 

The Army officers are going to play a 
prominent part in the tournament. 

One of the side features of the tourna- 
ment will be a race matinee on Saturday, 
February 4, at the Del Monte mile track. 
There will be five events, with the officers 
and enlisted men of the Monterey Presidio 
making entries, and two open races. On 
February 25 a paper chase is to be held 
over the picturesque trail at Pebble Beach. 



Techau Tavern Scene of Brilliant, Artistic 
Entertainment 

A series of unusually interesting and 
mirth-provoking entertainers are brightening 
up the evenings at this famous cafe. Dance 
features, songs and humorous features vie 
with one another for the honors of being 
most popular. Amateur nights, which are 
on Tuesdays and Fridays, seem to be grow- 
ing in popularity by leaps and bounds, to 
judge by the ever-increasing numbers that 
throng the tavern on these particular nights. 
Small wonder, you will say, after an evening 
spent among the happy, informal and joyous 
frequenters of the evening. There are "lucky 
dances" on these nights as well as on all 
other nights. There is no competition to 
these dances. It is a matter of luck. The 
winners receive Gruenhagen's chocolates and 
Melachrino cigarettes. The famous Techau 
Tavern orchestra is ever at hand to render 
the newest melodies, snappy jazz and toddle 
airs. 



Spared That Much — "How do you like 
being a soda water clerk?" 

"Now that I've (ried it," said the ex-bar- 
tender. "I rather like it." 

"But the old atmosphere is gone." 

"Yes, but there are compensations. When 
a man has had a soft drink he never says, 
'George, listen to this one.' " — Birmingham 
Age-Herald. 



The Probable Attraction Elizabeth— Oh. 
say! Maude is engaged to a ladies' tailor. 

Eleanor — Gracious! I wonder what the 
man could have seen in her! 

"I guess it was her economy. Maude is 
one of his customers and never has bought 
more than one dress in two years." 



The Reason — "But why is it called the 
Stock Exchange? 

"Because, Ethelbert, it is made up of so 
many animals — bulls, bears, lambs, wolves, 
yellow dogs, wild cats and lame ducks. 
There are plenty of monkeys there too, be- 
cause, dear boy, a broker can make a mon- 
key out of a trader any time he so desires." 
— Judge. 



But He Wanted a Drink— Gerald— Have 
you anything with a kick to it? 
Geraldine — Here comes father. 



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Hotel 
Ilione Krarny :?!>! San Francisco 



ANNUAL MEETING 
The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 

The regmlar annual meeting of the stookhold- 

neld at the office of th.- Corporal 
Fremont Str 

i>. the Hth 
hour of 1" o'clock a. purpose of 

g a Board 

r, and the transaction of sue' 
business as may come before the meeting. 

CHAS VKR. Secretary 

Office. 75 Fremon- Francisco. Cal. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1922 




Glandular Literature 

All kinds of writers are fomenting their 
brains just now to evolve new thoughts on 
the subject of personality and vigor as af- 
fected by the glands. This may be called 
the glandular age. But a serious writer, 
Louis Berman, M.D., has written a serious 
book on the new and much discussed topic. 
Dr. Berman is a professor of Columbia Col- 
lege. "Why do individuals differ? Why does 
one man succeed, while another fails under 
the same conditions? What divides them 
into so-called 'types*?" Dr. Berman's book, 
"The Glands Regulating Personality," shows 
how man's individuality is controlled by the 
quality and quantity of internal secretions 
acting in him. Based on the most recent 
researches in physiology and psychology, 
there is a convincing quality in what Dr. 
Berman says, a fascinating porirayal of the 
personalities of men, a charm of style — all 
making this an absorbing book and one of 
decided value to him who is interested in 
human beings. 

New Books Received 

"Who Plants a Tree," an eclogue, by 
William F. McSparran, answers to the yearn- 
ings of the pure, sweet, simple things of life. 
Authors and Publishers Corporation, New 
York, publishers. 

¥ * * 

The word "exalted" may be chosen to 
characterize the intensely spiritual atmos- 
phere of this new collection of poems by 
Judith L. C. Garnett which she has so fi- 
tingly entitled "Temple Torches." The spirit 
of true religion breathes through the pages. 
Published by the Authors and Publishers 
Corporation, New York. 

In "The Flight of Guinevere and Other 
Poems," the author, George V. A. McClos- 
key, has added a rich gift to the world of 
intellect. Authors and Publishers Corpora- 
tion, New York, publishers. 

In "Coal, Government Ownership or Con- 
trol," D. J. McAdam, M.A.L.L.D., a national 
authority, has put into effect many fine ideas. 
Intimate knowledge of every question in 
connection with the vital subject with which 
the work deals is shown by the author, who 
is appalled by the grave condition. Pub- 
lished by the Authors and Publishers Cor- 
poration, New York. 



Visit of the "Vagabond Poet" 

Vachel Lindsay, first known as "The Vag- 
abond Poet," celebrated as the minstrel who 
sang the gospel of beauty by the wayside, 
distinguished as the author of "The Chinese 
Nightingale" and "General Booth Enters 
Heaven," will visit San Francisco Tuesday 
evening, January 24, under the auspices of 
Paul Elder. He will give a talk on his ex- 
periences while vagabonding in the west 
with Stephen Graham, and a reading of his 
poems, in the Colonial ball room, Hotel S'. 
Francis. He will give a reading also in the 
afternoon of the same day, January 24, in 
the Paul Elder gallery. 

Lindsay has endured as much adulation, 
female twitter and homage as any other five 
American poets. He is the only living Amer- 
ican poet who has been lionized in England. 
None cf this business can spoil him; he is 
permanently simple, and permanently shrewd 
and sane, with a startling sense of humor — 
when he laughs, the neighborhood rings. 
His visit is being looked forward to with 
great eagerness in local literary circles. 



k 



unb earns 



Business Diplomacy — "Josh eats with his 
knife an' drinks his coffee out of the sau- 
cer," said Mrs. Corntassel. 

"I told him to," replied her husband. 
"Summer boarders are complainin' about the 
prices we charge. The family has got to do 
something to keep up the impression that 
we're simple, unsophisticated country folks." 
— Washington Star. 



Better Than the Reverse — "Do you like 
housework, Bridget?" said the mistress to 
her new and elderly assistant. 

"Oi'll not lie to ye, mum," answered Bid- 
dy. "Oi do not; but av the two I prefer 
housework to the workhouse." — Boston 
Transcript. 



He Wanted a Pet — "My good man, you 
had better take the trolley car home." 

"Sh' no ushe! My wife wouldn't let me 
— hie — keep it in th' house." — Colgate Ban- 
ter. 



Tanked — Judge — Last night you were full 
of liquor; where did you get it? 

Guilty — At the filling station, your honor. 
— Missouri Showme, 



Re-Hearsing His Funeral — Two negro sol- 
diers who were returning from France at the 
close of the war were discussing what they 
would do when they returned to Richmond, 
Va. "Wliat are you going to do, Elijah?" 
asked one. 

"Well, Alexander," said the other as he 
looked dreamily across the steamer's rail at 
the horizon beyond, "when I get back to 
Richmond I'm going to put on white shoes, 
white pants, a white coat, an' a white tie, 
an' I'm going to walk down a street with 
white folks. What are you going to do, 
Alexander?" 

"Huh!" came the reply. "I'm going to 
put on black shoes, black pants, a black 
coat, an' a black tie, an' I'm goin' to walk 
down the street, too — beh'n' yo' hearse!" — 
Brooklyn Citizen. 



Kitchen Police — "Mary, were you enter- 
taining a man in the kitchen last night?" 

"That's for him to say, mum. I was do- 
ing my best with the materials I could find." 
— Liverpool Mercury. 



A Critical Stage — "Has she accepted him 
yet ?" 

"No, she is worried as to his finances — in 
fact, she is worrying herself into a decline!" 



Quality 1866— 66 Years— 1982 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 
Hiirlingamr Redwood Olty Menlo Park 

Sun Mu(. mi \Y noilsiih' 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom streets 

Sun Francisco Phone !)1G 

sun Muieu Phone 14«h 

Economy Durability 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

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SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 28, 1922 



No. 4 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

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— Only one man killed by speedsters and seven injured. The cold 
weather must be taking the pep out of the joy-riders. 

¥ ifi If 

— How does the fair sex in short skirts, thin slippers and gos- 
samer hosiery like the unexpected visit of Jack Frost? 

— Kick the politicians out of the unions, advises W. A. Appleton, 
secretary of the Federation. Yes, but what would be left if you did? 

— The Examiner says "the burning of the Mission High School 
affects only 1500 pupils." How about the taxpayers who have to 
pay? 

— A Sacramento River boatman has been unconscious for eleven 
days from bootleg whisky. The bootleggers are improving the kick 
in their merchandise. 

— All signs indicate that a real estate boom is only held back by 
the foolish notion of profiteers in labor and material that pre-war 
prices have gone forever. 

— Whatever may be the outcome of the $30,000,000 shipping 
combine, Banker Herbert Fleishhacker deserves high praise for start- 
ing it so enthusiastically. 

* * * 

— It is incomprehensible how the Mission High School could burn 
down with two platoons of highly-paid firemen ; but lots of official 
slip-ups are inexplicable. 

¥ ¥ * 

■ — Instead of a triumphal arch across the main street, the Los 
Angelanos placed an old hearse in honor of Orator P. H. McCarthy. 
No wonder Los Angeles grows. 

* * * 

— William Sproule, president of the Southern Pacific Company, 
for Park Commissioner. That's the kind of appointment to give 
people faith in San Francisco. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Supervisor Scott may raise a laugh at Supervisor McSheehy's 
attempts to reduce municipal extravagance in steel rail purchases. 
But wait till "Noisy Bill" runs the next time on his own record of 
standing in with the push. He laughs best who laughs last. 



— Nothing shows better how jazz journalism has destroyed the 
newspapers' sense of proportion than the absurd fuss over Mary 
Garden's management of her opera company. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 
— Now the police courts and police are becoming fierce against 
reckless speeders who leave their shattered victims to die in the 
street. Why didn't they make examples long ago? 

— Hoover predicts a strike of coal miners, as the national agree- 
ment will not be renewed. A prophet takes no chances on his repu- 
tation by predicting a union strike any old time. 

— If Yellowley arms Volstead with rifles, as the newspapers inti- 
mate, the legalizing of beer and wine will come all the sooner. The 
free American public is warming up. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 
— General Pershing's refusal of a distinguished service cross will 
please all true Americans. It is the fashion with many foreign war- 
riors to carry enough medals to start a wholesale tin shop. 

— The Associated Press, which gives us all kinds of foolish news, 
says King Gustave of Sweden has the grip. Has his Swedish High- 
ness got a grip on his throne? That's the question these days. 

— The reporters say the speeder who killed a man on Stockton 
street and ran away was going thirty-five or forty miles an hour. 
Thrice that, most likely. Forty miles is only for funerals. 

— The New York up-state Democrats are afraid Hearst will run 
for Governor or Senator next fall, and they remember the Jonah 
he was to the party in 1906. He would be worse this year or any 
year. 

— It has transpired that Horace E. Dodge, automobile manufac- 
turer, Detroit, paid $825,000 for Russian royal pearls for his wife. 
A queer turn of fate. How many Detroit car builders can buy royal 
jewels next year? 

¥ * ¥ 

— It must be a galling thought to Hearst that though he inher- 
ited thirty millions and a Harvard education, he can't get nearer 
to the White House than the woodshed. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Supervisor Warren Shannon did not have his report quite ready 
to read to the Board last Monday on his recent success in cement- 
ing friendly commercial relations with the Orient. The Board do- 
nated $2000 for the junket. Taxpayers' money comes easy — to the 
taxeaters. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




When loss in excise taxes. 
The Devil Essential to Booze Crusaders enforcement expenses and 

penalty collections were 
balanced, prohibition cost the Government over one hundred and 
sixty-nine million dollars in the fiscal year 1921. The figures have 
just been obtained from Washington. This amount of direct expense 
saddled on the taxpayers to enforce a fanatical sumptuary law is 
explainable only on the supposition that the American people are a 
weak and besotted race, who must be deprived of all intoxicants, 
including light beers and wines, or the nation would wallow in in- 
temperance and be swallowed up in perdition. 

But for over one hundred and sixty years America has had in- 
toxicating beverages in its cellars, and yet has advanced in national 
strength and wealth, if not in wisdom. The increase of wisdom is 
to be doubted, when at this advanced stage of our national devel- 
opment one hundred million people allow a minority faction to 
change the trend of their non-sectarian free Republic by writing 
prohibition in its Constitution. At one step we have gone back to 
the pseudo morality of the Connecticut Blue Laws that fined a man 
caught kissing his wife on Sunday. When we visualize a glass of 
beer or wine as a temptation of the devil, to be feared, we are 
slipping. 

Sinful historians may say that the Connecticut Puritans, though 
they discouraged the kiss of domestic love on Sunday, were not 
averse to a swig of hard cider behind the door on any day. The 
better the day the bigger the swig. But that comes under the ban 
of hearsay, not to be presented as competent evidence in any court 
of law; and heaven forefend that we should demand a place on 
the records for any hearsay libel on Blue Law saintliness. 

The Reverend Cotton Mather's army of righteousness in Boston 
fought the devil and all his works with a holy ferocity characteristic 
of their pious cult. A personal devil was essential to their self- 
righteousness. Reverend Mather tells us in his autobiography that 
when preparing his Sunday sermons in his study he could hear the 
personage with the tail and hoofs snorting around in hot anger. 
When the uncompromising parson gave his antagonist an unusually 
stiff jab of his pen, Satan uttered a grunt like a pugilist who had 
received what the sporting reporters describe as a "haymaker in 
the solar plexus." 

It is very funny, the reading of the Reverend Cotton Mather's 
autobiography in these days of revised theology, when the personal 
devil is to many people a myth like Santa Claus. 

But not a myth to everyone. Oh no! The devil is as essential 
to a true Puritan's dogma as a bark to a watch-dog. Without the 
devil to excite his hostility to all human indulgences, the Puritan's 
watchfulness of human weakness would be relaxed. The devil would 
sneak upon us like a coyote on a flock of lambs. The Day of Judg- 
ment would prematurely arrive. The sleepless reformer who would 
dash even a dipper of sweetened church lemonade from a tempted 
brother's lips constantly requires the devil in some shape before his 
eyes to make his sermons effective. 

Reverend Cotton Mather was sure of his personal devil — the in- 
visible fiend who looked over the good parson's shoulder and ground 
his teeth as he read the sermons to be delivered from the pulpit 
next Sunday. 

Cotton Mather's devil has only changed his shape somewhat 
since. He has lost the horns and tail, but his activities continue. 
He does not any more enter the twisted bodies of old women who 
ride brooms in the wind and use their "evil eye" to cause cattle 
to fall sick and children to grow misshapen. The Reverend Mather 



advised that such old women should be hanged or burned. Reform- 
ing Puritans no longer preach that half-witted hags, crazed with 
sickness or domestic troubles, are malicious witches, in league with 
the devil. The Fiend of Darkness has changed his field of opera- 
tions, but is not yet a figure of straw. Nol His coat is of asbestos, 
for his habitat is still the hottest corner in Hades when not wander- 
ing around in quest of victims with all his baits and traps — bottles 
of bootleg whisky, decks of cards, ankles of divorce court beauties, 
bags of embezzlers' coin, pool room signs, etc. 

One is stunned by the thought of the Puritan reformer's hopeless- 
ness should his personal devil disappear completely from the earth. 
He would be like a medicine man of the Zulus deprived of his drum 
and his disguise of wild animal skins, to scare death away from 
the huts of sick niggers by his howlings. Between the African doc- 
tor of dusky bodies and the prohibition medicine man of 1921, 
saving white souls by howling his incantations over a beer mug or 
a glass of wine, there is not as far a cry as most people think. 
Primitive savagery sticks out of the performances of both prac- 
titioners. How far the world is from common sense is shown by 
the deliberate loss of over one hundred and sixty-nine million dol- 
lars in 1921 for enforcement of so-called prohibition and enrich- 
ment of the army of bootleggers in league with the devil with a 
flask in his hip pocket. 



New York is one of the closed-shop cities 
The Closed Shop Evils of the United States and the housing mess 
there is bad. The tenement house commis- 
sion reports that there is a shortage of 80,000 apartments. Up to 
the year 1917 about 25,000 apartments were added annually to the 
city's housing facilities. Since that year 29,120 apartments have 
been added altogether. The resultant lack of housing affects mostly 
the poorer classes. There has never been any paucity of expensive 
places to rent. What is needed, and has been prevented, "largely 
by the corruption of contractors and unions," declares the tenement 
house commission, "is the building of apartments which can be 
made available at small rental." 

The unions have in a measure capitulated, "but that is not a 
solution of the whole problem," declares the New York World. "The 
number of illegal combinations which have been formed to fix prices 
on building materials surpasses belief, and the practices of the 
Building Employers' Association are more damaging to honest build- 
ing than were the worst of the union rules. But an important step 
has been taken toward the restoration of efficiency, and there are 
others to follow." 

The closed shop with the limitation of apprentices has been the 
basis of most of the troubles in the building trades. By the tactics 
of the unions, building became so expensive that prudent people 
decided not to build. No adequate return on their investment could 
be relied on. People do not built for philanthropic purposes. It is 
a business matter, and if hazardous is avoided by cautious investors. 

In every closed-shop city like New York, the politicians in power 
have co-operated with the unions to make building more expensive. 
All kinds of restrictions have been adopted to increase the costs. 
Rooms which some years ago were constructed for $500 could not 
be duplicated for $1000. 

Another inseparable condition of building in closed-shop cities is 
the combination of contractors and material men against the owner 
of a building. All stand in together to tax the owner to the last 
possible cent. In the long run they kill the goose which lays the 



January 28, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



5 



golden egg. People put their money into something besides houses. 
The growth of closed-shop cities is retarded and rents become ruin- 
ous. 

The whole theory of Gompers and his Federation of Labor to 
raise prices and shorten hours while limiting output is disastrous. 
In all the years he has been at the head of organized labor, Gompers 
has never advocated a measure to make a union card the guarantee 
that the holder was an expert mechanic, who would give an honest 
day's work for a fair day's pay. Every move has been to establish 
the idea that the possession of a union card guaranteed the holder 
the highest pay for the least work, regardless of his skill. To insure 
that condition, apprentices were limited in all trades and excluded 
from several. The unions became absolute labor trusts of the most 
selfish character. Such a condition could not continue in the United 
States without destruction to all industrial activity. 



The death of Pope Benedict XV 
Pope Benedict a Great Diplomat must be regarded as an event of 

political importance, as he was 
the head of a following of nearly three hundred millions. The 
Christian world is about divided between Protestants and Catholics. 
Formerly the Pope asserted temporal sovereignty, and Emperors and 
Kings trembled at his displeasure. His denunciation might unseat 
them. 

In later years the temporal power of the Popes has been lost, but 
statesmen the world over have been cautious in their dealings wi'.h 
the Vatican. No politician, high or low, desires to antagonize the 
head of a following of nearly three hundred millions. 

The Papacy under the late Pope regained some of its political 
prestige. France, which some years ago expelled most of its re- 
ligious orders, has appointed an envoy to the Vatican. The French 
Government within the past year received with public honors in 
Paris the Cardinal sent to France by the Vatican. The Paris press 
spoke eulogistically of the resumption of formal and friendly rela- 
tions with the Papal court. 

Formerly France was a pillar of Catholicism, but in the reign of 
terror the Paris populace massacred the priests, nobility and royalty 
alike. Again in the Paris commune of 1870-71 there was a mas- 
sacre of priests. The Paris communists shot the Archbishop of 
Paris, whom they held as a hostage. So France ceased to be classi- 
fied as orthodox. Some years ago when the French monks and 
nuns were expelled, the French Government ordered all the cruci- 
fixes to be removed from the Courts of Justice, and the Minister 
of Education declared in a speech widely heralded in Paris. "We 
have driven Christ out of the courts, and we shall not stop until we 
drive him out of the schools." 

That such an implacable policy should be followed by the re- 
sumption of friendly diplomatic relations between the Paris gov- 
ernment and the Vatican speaks volumes for the skill of Benedict 
XV as a diplomat. Not only did he break down the barriers of 
radicalism which separated the Vatican from France, but he drew 
federated Italy and the Vatican closer than seemed possible. Il will 
not be easy to find a successor who combines the same qualities of 
success in an age of advancing free thought and the conflict of 
reason with faith. 



Southern Congressmen are mak- 
Opposition to Anti-Lynching Law ing a great fuss over the anli- 

lynching bill, which they claim 
is a violent invasion of the police powers of the states, but their 
opposition is oratory wasted. Lynching is a great stain on civilized 
government. It is an ineffaceable stain when accompanied by the 
inhumanities of burning at the stake, which have been taking place 
in the expression of white vengeance on negroes in the South. In 
the United States the annual murder record of 15,000, with numer- 
ous Ivnchings as savage as anything in Indian records, raises serious 



doubts of local self-government to maintain civilization. A tradition 
that state sovereignty is too sacred to be interfered with, even 
though it tolerates burning alive by mobs, is not likely to have an 
irresistible appeal. State governments can prevent lawlessness if 
they attempt the task honestly and fearlessly. Lynchings are gen- 
erally conducted by a handful of people, and there must be tacit 
understanding that the lynchers are safe from the law, or they 
would not so violently break it by constituting themselves judges 
and juries. If the Federal power usurps its authority, it is because 
the states are negligent of their duties to carry out their laws. The 
present guarding of the postoffices by United States Marines is 
proof of the feebleness, or crookedness, of the states in preventing 
crime. Bandits made the postoffices their special objects of attack, 
but a few Marines in each city have stopped the banditry. Why did 
not all the well-paid police stop it? Did they make the attempt? 

The posting of Marines as sentries in the postoffices is an in- 
vasion of state police powers. The state should protect life and 
property, but it could not keep the postoffice bandits away. A few 
dozen Marines protect the mails where all the police and other 
state officials were useless. Are the citizens of our Republic to be 
impressed with the idea that local self-government is lawlessness 
and disorder, while the Federal arm of the law is strong? 

Some years ago we had a state quarantine service in San Fran- 
cisco. It was said to be inefficient and addicted to graft. The Fed- 
eral power shouldered it, and United States quarantine officers 
exercise authority where state politicians formerly grafted. 

The guardianship of the National Parks is another instance of the 
state powers being on the wane. No one will maintain that the 
Yosemite under our legislative control was a credit. Our State 
Legislature would have turned our Yosemite into a sheep run and 
sawmill to provide provincial politicians with petty graft. 

The anti-lynching law which the Southern Congressmen oppose 
is invasion of state sovereignty. One of the provisions most ob- 
jectionable to Southern Congressmen is the imposition of a fine of 
$10,000 on any county where a lynching takes place. It is an awful 
example of Federal usurpation, they say. But they cared nothing 
for the sacred state powers when they advocated the passage of the 
Eighteenth Amendment, which wrote the sumptuary law of prohibi- 
tion into the Constitution. Prohibition has been declared by leading 
Democratic newspapers the most deadly blow ever struck at the 
rights and powers of the states since the beginning of the Govern- 
ment. And the loudest Democrat of modern days, William Jennings 
Bryan, was the chief assailant. 

Every decent citizen of the United States will be more interested 
in the anti-lynching law because it strikes at savage lawlessness 
which is giving the United States a bad name in the civilized world, 
than because of its relations to Democratic doctrine of state rights. 
The rights of humanity are far broader than the rights of states 
championed by prejudiced politicians. 



That a new era will begin for the Pacific 
New Era in the Pacific is the British idea of the effects of the 
Washington conference. The London Times 
agrees with the comments of the Australian Premier that the con- 
ference "gives hope of peace and harmony in the Pacific. The 
menace of war in the Pacific — whether war between two of her 
nearest neighbors and best customers, or. worse still, war in which 
she herself, perforce, took active part — has hung like a nightmare 
over the nation for years. And now the Australian people are in 
the happy position of looking forward, not to years of warlike prep- 
aration, but to years of peaceful development. Spared the stern 
necessity of the former, it surely behooves her to put every effort 
into the latter." 

A guarantee of peace and harmony in the Pacific must have as 
beneficial an effect on our Pacific Coast and on California in par- 
ticular as on Australia. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1922 




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Free Meals For Congressmen 

By Harvey Broughan 



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THE placing of Congressional barbers and waiters on the pay- 
roll of the Government is causing more scandal than the orig- 
inators of the resolution anticipated. "Why should all those barbers 
in the House bathrooms draw $70 a month from the Government?" 
asked Representative Blanton of Texas the other day in a speech 
to his colleagues condemnatory of graft. 

The Texas member may have been only desirous of making a 
political point against the opposition party, but his comments were 
nevertheless of general interest to the taxpayers. 

"Why should all those barbers be placed on the payroll of the 
Government? How many taxpayers know that Congress not only 
desires to have its shaves, but its food as well, paid for by shifting 
the restaurant payroll to the Government? The Senate long ago 
placed its waiters and barbers on the public payroll, disguised as 
'attaches.' The House of Representatives is about to do the same 
thing to make its restaurant pay." 

Whatever Representative Blanton's object in advertising the graft, 
he deserves the thanks of taxpayers for calling attention to it. 

"Why should a staff of body-rubbers be retained to rub Con- 
gressmen when they come back from golf games or other places 
of amusement?" asked Blanton the other day, and nobody could 
give any reasonable explanation. 

"Why should they be paid by the people's money?" the Texas 
economist continued. "Why do we not pay them when we want to 
be rubbed, I ask you? Why, all those fixtures and that furniture in 
that bathroom and barber shop are paid for by the Government. 
They are paid for and furnished by the Government. Why, in the 
splendid offices that are furnished each one of us, magnificently 
furnished, we are supplied with a secretary and an extra clerk. We 
are furnished with the finest furniture and carpets. We are fur- 
nished with two typewriting machines. We are furnished everything 
we need — comb and brush, clothes brushes, soap, hot and cold 
water, and clean towels every day. And what else? In every Con- 
gress each one of us has credited to his account $125 each session 
for stationery. In the war Congress we each had $375 credited to 
our account in the stationery room, and in the last Congress $375 
each. We have already had $250 credited in this Congress, less 
than a year old, to each one of us. 

"What do we do with the money? What do they keep in the 
House of Representatives' stationery room for us to buy with it? 
Let me show you some of the things they keep in the stationery 
room for Congressmen of the United States to buy with Government 
money." 

It was all right to furnish the Congressmen with regular official 
stationery, but to give them a credit of $375 for a number of arti- 
cles that had no relation to law-makers' official duties was inex- 
plicable from the Texas viewpoint. Congressman Blanton exhibited 
a printed list of articles purchaseable from the stationery room, 
which the members could obtain: 

"Big box of fine, fancy, lady's stationery, which down town sells 
for $6, $8 or $10, but you buy it over here because they buy it at 
the manufacturer's prices — you buy it for less than $4 over here. 
What else do they keep over there? Fine desk pads like this, for 
instance, that sell for $19 at manufacturer's price. The price to the 
Government is $19. That is kept there for sale. What else is kept 
there? Take, for instance, carving knives and forks, with steels, 
like this. What use have we as Congressmen for such truck as that? 
What else is kept there? Let me see. Now this came from the sta- 
tionery room. This is a leather-bound poker set, with four decks of 



cards and full of red and white and blue poker chips. It is in a 
leather-covered box, and would cost about $25 in the stores in 
Washington. It is kept there for us Congressmen to buy with Gov- 
ernment money. And they furnish you with a dozen extra decks of 
cards to go with it. (Exhibiting them.) 

"What else do they furnish? Thing of this kind (exhibiting): 
Notice the color of the lining, fancy lavender, lady's manicure set; 
all these pieces, every one of them with pearl handles, that in the 
stores- of Washington would sell for about $40. Over here it sells 
for about $20. That is what they keep there for Congressmen to 
buy. 

"Now, you know they had so much demand for this little article 
(exhibiting), a pocket pint whisky flask, covered with ostrich-skin 
leather, during Christmas time that they sold out. What else do 
they have there? Ladies' bags of this character, covered with gen- 
uine ostrich leather, guaranteed, on the outside and fixed up with 
that character of lining in the inside. At the wholesale manufac- 
turer's price that sells for $22.90. Down town it would cost about 
$40. You buy it from a paid employe of the Government on the 
payroll of the Government, and he sells you articles of that kind 
on your stationery account! 

"Now, what else do they keep there? I have a number of things 
I want to show you that you can buy with Government money on 
your credit of $375 a Congress in the stationery room. Here is a 
lady's toilet set with brush, comb and a big fine mirror. Then they 
have fine electric chafing dishes that at manufacturers' prices cost 
about $15, while in the stores of Washington they sell for about 
$25 or $30. I say, as the gentleman from Mississippi well said, the 
graft is too little for Congressmen to permit to exist longer. I went 
to the dean of a delegation after I had been here less than six 
months, a man who is honest, a man in whom I have the utmost 
confidence, and I said: 'John, we have got to stop this, and we 
will stop it.' He laughed at me. He says: 'Tom, this was here 
fifty years before you and I got here. It was here when I came 
here, nearly twenty years ago, and it was here when you got here. 
You had better let it alone.' He says, 'If you ever get up on the 
floor of the House and say anything against it, they will call you 
a demagogue,' and they did. He knew what he was talking about." 

But Blanton says he will not be discouraged, nor will he be de- 
feated at the next election. The inclusion of waiters on the Gov- 
ernment payroll in order to give the national law-makers free food 
is emphatically disapproved by the Texan. He points out that now: 

"The Government furnishes rent-free the kitchens, the cooking 
ranges, the refrigerators, the utensils, the fuel and power, the restau- 
rant dining rooms, the fine mirrors that run from the floor to the 
ceiling, the fine chandeliers, the fine new furniture just installed, the 
silver, the china, the glassware, the linen tablecloths and napkins, 
and most of the overhead expense. And this resolution will pay all 
losses on food and employment of cooks and waiters out of the 
people's money." 

The Capital at Washington has little left of the simplicity at 
which the founders of the Republic aimed. No empire could keep 
pace with our extravagance. 



— When you see a picture of some young man who looks like a 
grocer's clerk standing for his photograph these days, do not be 
surprised to read that he is some dynastic monarch out of his job. 
How the mighty have fallen. 



January 28, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Lyedhings and Me^ir© Tewn 




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TN the recent^debates in Congas on the anti-lynching bill, Rep- General indicated that he had ordered that peonage violators be 



r N the recent debates in Congress on the anti-lynching bill, Rep- 
resentative Goodykoontz of West Virginia charged that in addi- 
tion to having the worst record on lynchings, Georgia had practiced 
peonage. 

"Lynchings," said Goodykoontz, "while vastly more numerous in 
the Southern states, are not confined to that region, and although 
in the large majority of cases originating in that section the colored 
man has been the victim. Yet the white man has not been exempt. 
It is even true that women of both colors have suffered the same 
fate. Of a list of reported lynchings from 1889 to 1918, it is shown 
that 3224 were killed by mobs; of those, 702 were white persons 
and 2522 were negroes, hanged, shot or burned; of the total, 1 1 
were white and 50 colored women. Just how many of these were 
guilty, we do not know. Of the number lynched, Georgia seems to 
have drawn the grand prize, having 386 to her credit. Mississippi 
was next in line with 373 as her quota, and Texas followed with 
the very good showing of 335. 

"Bear in mind that these figures do not cover the time since 

1918, a period of nearly three years. Conditions became so terrible 
in Georgia as that on April 22, 1921, her then Governor, Hon. 
Hugh M. Dorsey, a worthy man and a good officer, since relegated 
to private life, having called a conference of the leading citizens 
of that state, laid before them a report detailing a statement of 
facts in the case of over a hundred negroes that within two years 
next prior had been lynched, held in peonage, driven out of the 
state by organized lawlessness, or subjected to cruelty. 

"Governor Dorsey says that the 1 35 examples he has grouped 
are not all; that he has made no attempt to collect every case; 
that if such an effort were made the number could be multiplied. 
The Governor further says that 'in some counties the negro is being 
driven out as though he were a wild beast.' In other counties that 
he is being held as a slave. In other counties 'no negroes remain," 
and furthermore, that 'in only two of the 1 35 cases cited is the 
"usual crime" against white women involved.' 

"Dorsey's investigation concerning one case revealed that in July. 

1919, two white men, drunk, went in the night-time to the section 
of the town occupied by colored people; that an elderly colored 
man got his gun and went into the streets to protect the women 
of his race; that in the shooting that followed one of the white men 
was killed; the negro was taken by a mob and lynched. That in 
October, 1919, a negro who was a preacher and teacher had a 
dispute with a farmer about wages; that the farmer attacked the 
negro with an axe; that the negro shot the farmer with bird shot; 
that the negro was taken from the sheriff and lynched; that the 
man who was shot is alive. 

"That a negro, being suspected of murdering a white woman, 
was arrested and placed in jail, taken therefrom, and 'in the midst 
of a mob of 3000 was burned to death by a slow fire, the torture 
being prolonged as much as possible.' 

"The examples I have cited merely illustrate cases of lynching 
in Georgia, of which she had, down to and including the year 1918. 
368 to her credit. For 1919 her record shows that of the victims 
taken from officers and jails she again headed the list, five of her 
victims being burned at the stake. 

"Dorsey — whose term has since expired and who failed of elec- 
tion to the Senate — exposed a condition of peonage in Georgia that 
was truly revolting and which also constituted an indictment of the 
last national administration for failure to enforce the laws against 
peonage. In a public statement recently made the present Attorney 



General indicated that he 
indicted and prosecuted. 

"When Roosevelt was the President a lot of peonage violators 
were sent to the penitentiary, but during Mr. Wilson's administra- 
tion these traffickers in human labor again grew bold and were 
allowed to carry on their human slavery unmolested and unafraid. 

"Governor Dorsey shows that the worst forms of peonage have 
existed in Georgia. When negroes 'escaped' they were arrested and 
brought back, even from other states, and 'sold' from one man to 
another. That negroes were 'cheated and swindled,' 'threatened,' 
and 'struck in the face' and 'severely whipped' and 'put to work,' 
'guarded,' and 'locked up' every night. I also find the following 
concerning two negroes who had 'run away.' Governor Dorsey says : 
'They were caught, brought back, and whipped. The other negro 
begged to be killed. The white owner shot him.' 

"A weight was put about him and he was sunk in a pond. Under 
the heading 'The negro driven out by organized lawlessness,' the 
Governor of Georgia reveals a system of practices that for mean- 
ness and cruelty is almost beyond human imagination and beggars 
description." 



LANDLORD NOT CARE-FREE 

A woman, when judgment was given against her at the West 
London County Court for over £40 for rent of a flat and for dilapi- 
dations, asked: "What can I do? I have no money myself, and 
my husband has not sent me my usual allowance for two months." 
Judge Sturges: "What can you do? Why, you are in a very happy 
position. You can't pay because your husband has not sent you 
any money. The goods in the flat cannot be seized because they 
are not yours, and, as you are a married woman, you cannot be 
sent to prison. So you can walk away care-free." — London Times. 



BETTER LOOK HAPPY 

The celebrated Mrs. Asquith. describing an election in which she 
assisted her brother, one of the candidates, says that on the polling 
day she "wore a white dress and a fine hat tied with black velvet 
strings and a rose over my left ear. I do not pretend to much looks, 
but. such as they are, they are under my control, and, whatever one 
may fear is going to happen, it is better to look happy as it helps 
to give oneself and other people confidence." 



Et'ROP H'S F A M V S WOND B R L A S S 
X MARVELOUS \KH INVENTION 

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A COMBINED IH'KHX unil I II 111 
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I -efnl Indoors or Oul. Kreiilnr Prire S3-V00. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Optical Raperl .mil Importers of Optical Specialties 

I 

960 Market street, between Mason and Taylor street* 

PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1922 




'tear &&xrt Who t!x depart (tout' 
Ooe IbiLviIJ pkj Ux dcvil.sir.vith jm. 



— When Hearst's $150,000 editor, Brisbane, is shy of editorial 
ideas, he often hashes up for the oi polloi scaps of ancient Greek 
mythology. It sounds erudite and tickles the ears of the groundlings. 
The effect on his audience is like that created by the rotund phrase- 
ology of Oliver Goldsmith's village schoolmaster, delivered for the 
edification of a bunch of rustics: 

"And still he talked, and still the wonder grew 
That one small head could carry all he knew." 

— One of Editor Brisbane's recent classical lectures relates to the 
burning of the Serapion at Alexandria, which contained 200,000 
volumes given to Cleopatra by Marc Anthony. The discredit of the 
incendiarism he saddles on fanatical Christians, who wished to de- 
stroy pagan images. "What a pity!" cries the triple gold-plated 
editor. "What a blessing!" one had better say, judging by the 
mountains of literary muck that are being crammed into our present 
libraries. It is worse than a crime to wear out eyes reading 90 per 
cent of this dreary twaddle. As to the historical value of the Alex- 
andria library, one must remain in serious doubt. With the thou- 
sands of newspaper presses going full tilt, and the Associated Press 
combing the globe for items, not once in a thousand times do they 
give the facts straight. 

— History is a tissue of false statements set down by purblind 
partisans or deliberate liars. It was a good thing the fanatical 
Christians at Alexandria (admitting that they did) burned the old 
library, stuffed with the scribblings of ancient literary gents. It 
would not be altogether a calamity if all the libraries in the world, 
including the law libraries and theological, burned up, and (he 
world made a new start in the intellectual direction. 
•/• *f H- 

— Our gentle reminders to the City and County Attorney of San 
Francisco has caused that official to begin suit against Samuel G. 
Murphy for the $40,000 Golden Gate Park donation which he did 
not turn over to the city. The newspapers called attention this week 
to the filing of the suit against Murphy in New York, where he now 
resides. 

— Formerly Murphy was president of the First National Bank of 
San Francisco. He was named as residuary legatee in the will of 
Honora Sharpe, widow of a prominent lawyer, who left an estate 
valued at $200,000, for park improvements, primarily a memorial 
gate. Her husband had much to do with the development of Golden 
Gate Park. When the estate was settled up it was found that there 
was only $80,000 left, one-half of which, representing Murphy's 
trust, is still held on to by the former banker, who has moved from 
San Francisco. 

* * * 

— His explanation is that he became disgusted with the "legal 
entanglements" and kept the $40,000 in his pocket. One of the 
"entanglements" was that a former Board of Supervisors refused 
to accept $80,000 as the Widow Sharpe's donation. They insisted 
on receiving the full $200,000 she had willed. The upshot of the 
"entanglements" was that the ex-banker has never separated himself 
from the widow's mite. 



— Now the strangest part of this extraordinary affair is that the 
Widow Sharpe died in 1905. Though seventeen years have passed, 
no active steps to collect the money withheld from the city were 
taken until the News Letter began its expose of the dereliction two 
weeks ago. 

— What a commentary on our municipal department for the 
transaction of the city's legal affairs. No wonder we lose our water- 
rate cases and almost every other suit for the taxpayers' protection, 
if the activity of the City Attorney's office is to be judged by the 
feeble efforts to make ex-Banker Murphy cough up. 



— We do not blame Murphy for getting disgusted wi'h the "legal 
entanglements" in trying to turn over the patriotic widow's $40,000, 
but his personal chagrin should not befog his discernment of his 
duties as a man and a citizen. What does he intend to do with that 
widow's donation he has held on to all these years? Does he put 
the money out at interest and pocket that, too? Forty thousand 
dollars compounding at even 4 per cent savings bank rates would 
become quite a sum in seventeen years. Will he go on using the 
money and leave it in one grand bequest to charity under the title 
of "The Murphy Restitution Memorial Fund"? 



— It is no joke, this retention of a widows donation to Golden 
Gate Park for half a generation. When our municipal officials tol- 
erate such derelictions, anything may be done, smothered up and 
forgotten. Not that we wish to intimate that a noted ex-banker 
would desire to exclude the light of publicity from his transactions 
in the Honora Sharpe trust. He seems quite bold in his avowal of 
having kept the widow's money, as if it had come into his assets 
as part of a regular banking routine, justifiable by all the rules of 
finance, frenzied and otherwise. Does concentration on money bags 
and long columns of interest accounts shorten a man's moral eye- 
sight as well as his physical. 



— The rumor in the City Hall that the Mayor had cancelled the 
indemnity bonds issued by an insurance company, the manager of 
which was said to have spoken in terms critical of the municipal 
administration, recalls the story of that eminent labor statesman, 
Michael Casey. He was head of the Board of Works, notable for 
putting square pegs into round holes. Fitzpatrick, the paver, had 
spoken at his ward club in terms opprobious of the administration. 
And some days later the libeler was discovered by Mr. Casey walk- 
ing around the City Hall and conversing affably with elevator men, 
policemen and other busy functionaries. 

"Good mornin', Mr. Casey," quoth the paver. 

"Are you addressin' me?" demanded the head of the Board of 
Works, a glare in his eye. 

"Yis." 

"Git out of me City Hall this minute, as fast as your legs will 
take you. I'll have no inimies of the administration walkin' around 
here while I'm head of the Board of Works," muttered the indig- 
nant statesman. 



— The automobile expenses for the State Government in the past 
year have been only $350,000. And yet the taxpayers are talking 
about "the extravagance of the Stephens machine." They ought to 
consider themselves lucky it isn't a million more. 



— Judging by the speed Friend Richardson is showing in his 
training for Governorship, he will make a runaway race of it. 



January 28. 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



A Safe Proposition 



THE Supervisors have acted favorably on the recommendation 
of the Utilities Committee that a conference be called to dis- 
cuss the proposed purchase of the Market Street Railway properties. 
The proposition is thus to be placed directly before the public. 

It is argued by the critics of the plan to buy the Market Street 
lines that account is not taken of the taxes that would have to be 
obtained had the lines remained in private ownership. The reply to 
that criticism is, that we are acquiring a great income-earning prop- 
erty, paid for out of its own receipts, and that ultimately will give 
us both the taxes and the profits. 

We must not overlook the fact that since San Francisco began 
to operate car lines of her own, there have been enormous increases 
in the cost of equipment and materials, and considerable advances 
in wages, yet the 5-cent fare has remained stationary. 

Notwithstanding the advance of expenses, the municipal lines 
have been able to undertake pioneer construction which has pro- 
moted building and development. 

A city can afford to do pioneering, because it will show results 
in new revenues from new buildings, whereas a private corporation 
waits for the increase of population before undertaking to furnish 
service. It is the difference between slow civic progress and rapid 
development. 

The question before San Francisco is not like the theory of 
National ownership of railroads versus private ownership. Our 
problem is municipal ownership, directly under the eyes of the tax- 
payers. Everyone can see how the plan is working. We know how 
municipal car lines have built up Geary street and the Richmond 
district. The effect has been magical. It is demonstrated that effi- 
cient car service is vital to civic progress. 

There need be no hesitation in taking over other lines now in 
private hands, when they can be paid for out of earnings. We have 
two systems, a municipal and a private, and even if the city were 
not committed to public ownership as a progressive policy, it would 
be bad business to continue the dual system any longer than we 
must. Under the fear of municipal extensions and ultimate munici- 
pal ownership the private roads could not undertake development, 
and would give the minimum of service for the maximum of earn- 
ings. 



LLOYD GEORGE NOT COMING TO AMERICA 

It is not likely that Lloyd George will visit the United States, 
though his appearance has been looked for. The unsettled Irish 
question kept him away from the Washington conference. The ex- 
pected Economic conference to consider cancellation of the war 
debts is in a very nebulous condition. The London Times an- 
nounces: "In well-informed quarters which were seriously counting 
on the possibility of a visit by Mr. Lloyd George to America in the 
immediate future it is now believed that there is no likelihood of 
such a visit taking place, feeling in America, as our columns have 
lately testified, being unfavorable to any discussion of the question 
of the indebtedness of the Allies to that country." 



FASTER TRAIN SERVICE 

Important changes in its passenger train schedules in California. 
Oregon, Arizona and New Mexico, under which many trains will 
be speeded up where it can be done with safety, and additional 
trains provided, will be made effective February 12 by the Southern 
Pacific Company. The Shasta, running between San Francisco and 
Portland, will make the trip each way an hour faster, thus giving 
a twenty-eight and one-half hour service between the cities. 



* •:• ♦ •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• * •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• * * * * .;. <. * .;. * .;. .;. .;. .;. .;, .;, .♦. 

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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1922 



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WHAT he called "a candid explanatory statement of the situa- 
tion in France" was made on January 12 by Hon. Maurice 
Casenave, the financial expert of the disarmament conference, at a 
dinner of the Pennsylvania Bankers' Association in Philadelphia. 
Mr. Casenave's speech was intended to remove the impression in 
America that France had not acted entirely like a magnanimous 
and sincere friend of peace, ready to reduce her military forces. 

"France has been reproached with inordinate military ambitions 
and waste of her resources, because she wanted 350,000 tons of 
capital ships and cruisers and 90,000 tons of submarines," said M. 
Casenave. "This provoked universal disapproval and even indigna- 
tion. Dark designs were suspected; public references were made 
pretending that certain Frenchmen intended to wage war against 
our ally, who yesterday fought with us for liberty and civilization. 
I am glad that such utterances were made openly; it furnishes an 
opportunity to clear ourselves of an infamous and stupid suspicion. 
It is not with the view of attacking anybody that we ask for such 
a fleet; it is for the very simple reason that a big country must be 
in a position to rely upon herself, to protect her own coasts, and 
to assure communications with her overseas possessions. It is for 
the same reason that the United States and Great Britain, who were 
never suspected of being militaristic nor megalomaniac, ask for a 
fleet of 500.000 tons each." 

"The main reason," M. Casenave said, "why the demand of 
France caused such an emotion in the United States is because the 
man in the street in America ignores that the total area of the 
French colonies slightly exceeds that of the United States, Alaska, 
Porto Rico and the Philippines combined. Some of our overseas 
possessions, Algeria, Tunis, Morocco, only at a few hours' distance, 
really form a part of continental France; others, like Madagascar, 
an island as large as the state of Texas; Indo China, which covers 
an area equal to that of California, Oregon and Washington states 
combined, are located at distances varying from 5500 to 9000 miles. 
The islands of Oceania, which number over 100 and which were 
the object of the recent agreement regarding the Pacific, are located 
at the Antipodes of France. The total length of the coasts of the 
colonies is 7000 miles. The population figures 60,000,000 inhab- 
itants. 

"French possessions and colonies are very valuable. Their annual 
commerce was greatly developed during the war and now exceeds 
10,000,000 francs a year. They produce large quantities of tropical 
products, cereals, foodstuffs, metallic ores, and raw materials of 
every description which otherwise France would have to buy in 
foreign markets at a rate of exchange very unfavorable to us. 

"As soon as the armistice was signed we began reducing our 
budgetary expenses. Our naval expenses before the war amounted 
to 9 per cent of the total budget. Our naval expenses for 1920 
amounted to less than 4 per cent of the total budget. Moreover, in 
consideration of the concessions made by others, the French Gov- 
ernment has abandoned plans of ten new capital ships. 

"The fact which cannot be over-emphasized," declared M. Cas- 
enave, "is that at the present time the only desire of France is for 
peace. Peace is the main factor of France's financial and econom- 
ical reconstruction. This is the reason why France was the first to 
welcome, with the utmost sympathy, the proposal of a conference 
for the limitation of armaments when it was called by President 
Harding. 

"But in order to be fully effective, peace cannot be separated 
from security in the minds of the people of France. France as a 



nation has a long past and a long history. Owing to her geographi- 
cal position, it took long and bloody wars to build and to preserve 
her national unity. In the last fifty years France has been invaded 
twice— in 1870 and in 1914. 

"In 1807, after the Battle of Jena, Emperor Napoleon, then dom- 
inating Europe, and having all the potentates as his confederates, 
tried to annihilate the military power of Prussia. Nevertheless, how- 
ever, Prussia succeeded in building a militaristic organization so 
promptly that six years later she was in a position to send ths 
strong army which decided the fate of the Battle of Waterloo. 

"To be certain that such a nation as Germany is no longer a 
menace to France one has to have proofs that she is disarmed 
morally as well as materially, and that she is ready to pay for the 
wrong which she has committed. In the laboring and most honest 
classes there seems to be signs of repentance. But anyone returning 
from Germany is impressed by the fact that the great magnates of 
industry and the former junker classes are filled with the spirit of 
vengeance only. Can France run the risk of another attack? 

"During the negotiations for peace, in order to protect ourselves 
against future invasions, some of our great generals who enjoyed 
the confidence of the French people who they had saved, advised 
France to exact from Germany forever the frontier of the Rhine. 
More cold-blooded advice came from the allied nations. Their rep- 
resentatives promised the French people that their help would again 
be given in case of another attack. France believed in them and 
refused to heed the advice of her military chiefs. Circumstances, 
which it is useless to recall, proved that France had to rely solely 
upon her own army to protect a frontier which had proved ineffi- 
cient in 1870. 

"In spite of the fact that Germany in the last war was not in- 
vaded as we were in 1870, and that three years have passed since 
the cessation of the hostilities, Germany is far from having paid us 
half of what we in 1870 had paid to Germany in one year. In 
order to insure by our own means the protection of our frontier 
and to secure the fulfillment of obligations which were laid upon us 
by virtue of the mandates, or which were imposed upon Germany 
in our favor, we need an army. This army, which is sometimes 
made a subject to reproach us with, seemed very useful to all, for 
since the end of the war not long ago, when Poland had been 
crushed and when Warsaw was menaced by the triumphant armies 
of bolshevism, what would have become of the world at that time 
if the army of France had not been ready? 

"But these times are past and we hope they never will be known 
again. The bolshevists themselves seem to have reached a more 
thorough understanding of what nations owe each other. 

"The above explanations are necessary to enable you to under- 
stand the position taken by France at the Washington conference, 
as well as to show you that France since the end of the war suc- 
ceeded in reducing her army by one-third. 

"This is a candid explanatory statement of the situation of 
France. Lately it has been the subject of so much discussion that 
I thought it would prove of some interest to you to have it ex- 
plained from an economic as well as from a political point of view. 
I hope that you will admit that, under the most trying circum- 
stances which were ever borne by a nation, France has followed a 
line of conduct in conformity with her past of courage and that 
the adopted course will be fruitful, bringing in the future peace and 
prosperity to herself and to the world." 



January 28, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



War Fear Keep Them Back 



That America has not fully improved her opportunities is stated 
in his articles for English publications by the noted correspondent, 
H. G. Wells. In the Manchester Guardian he writes : 

"I have been motoring about a little in Maryland and Virginia, 
and I am astounded at the many miserable wood houses I see — 
hovels rather than houses — the abodes very often of white men. I 
am astonished at the wretched fences about the ill-kept patches of 
cultivation, and by the extreme illiteracy of many of the poorer 
folk, white as well as colored, with whom I have had a chance of 
talking. I have to remind myself that I am in what is now the 
greatest, richest, most powerful country in the world. But with this 
country now, as with every country, army, navy, war debt charges, 
and the rest of the legacy of past wars consume the national 
revenue. 

"America is not spending a tithe of what she ought to be spend- 
ing on schools, on the maintenance of a housing standard, and on 
roads and transport. She improves in all things at no great pace, 
because of the disunion of the world and the threat of war. 

"England and France, which were once far ahead of her in these 
respects of housing, transport, and popular education, are now on 
the whole declining through the excessive fiscal burdens they are 
under (a penalty?) to pay for the late war and prepare for fresh 
ones. But I ask you to think what would happen to a world from 
which that burden of unpreparedness was lifted. The result of that 
relief would be a diversion of the huge maintenance allowance of 
the war-god to just these starved and neglected things. 

"Stanch that waste throughout the earth, and the saved wealth 
and energy will begin at once to flow in the direction of better 
houses, towards a steady increase in the order and graciousness of 
our unkempt and slovenly countrysides, to making better roads 
throughout the globe until the globe is accessible and to a huge 
enrichment and invigoration of education. 

"How fair and lovely such countries as France and Germany and 
Italy might be today if the dark threat of war that keeps them so 
gaunt and poverty-struck could be lifted from them!" 



THE FRENCH IDEA 

M. Briand, though out of the French Government, is by no means 
out of French politics. The cordiality of the French and British 
relations has been lessened by the retirement of Briand, who had 
shown a desire to remain in accord with Secretary Hughes and 
Lloyd George in the proposition submitted to the Washington con- 
ference. Briand went too far to please French national pride. His 
countrymen did not wish to have it appear to the world that France 
was a power of secondary importance, taking her cue from Wash- 
ington or London. As the French press has remarked, the French 
believed they were slipping and Briand went out of power. A more 
firm national policy will be expressed by his successor, M. Poincare. 
The Paris Journal des Debats expresses clearly the French idea: 
"Why, because France yields on one point, should she always be 
expected to yield on others? Since she was to have few capital 
ships, a weak offensive Navy, she could reasonably ask for a strong 
defensive fleet — of submarines and destroyers. Nor were submarines 
necessarily an inhuman weapon. That depended on the people who 
used them. A cruiser or a mine could as well have sunk the Lusi- 
tania as a submarine — as well have left the passengers to drown. 
On three frontiers France is washed by the sea, and these frontiers 
have to be defended, while she has a population of sixty-two mil- 
lions, scattered over the globe. To ensure their safety and com- 
munications with them a sufficient defensive fleet is necessary, and 
it is wholly unfair to accuse France of militarism because she wants 
to defend them." 



A Most Interesting 
<mm, Trip [oik East 



is over the 



Sunset Route 

—through Los Angeles, 
Tucson, El Paso, San 
Antonio, Houston and 
New Orleans. 



TWO DAILY TRAINS FROM SAN FRANCISCO 
(Third Street Station) 

"Sunset Limited" Lv. 5:00 p.m. 

Ar. New Orleans 7:35 p.m. (3d Day) 
"Sunset Express" Lv. 8:15 p.m. 

Ar. New Orleans 6:25 p.m. (4th Day) 

CONNECTING WITH SOITIIF.RN PACIFIC OCBAH STEAM- 
BBS sailing weekly to New York; also with dally trains to 
North and Bast 

■tail anil steamer fare Name a- All-Kail, but Includes meals and 

bertha on steamers. "100 Uolden n s at sea." 

On Your Way—See the 

APACHE TRAIL OF ARIZONA- 

By aulo through the heart of "Apache Land" — a maze of 
canyons, peaks and cliffs aglow with bright colors — 120 
miles of scenic splendor. A one-day side trip or detour. 

in loin IKIDI MAB1COPA throuch PI Ham 

and 1,1.1 OB BIDE TRIP KROM BOWIE MA 

OLOBB tn Rm^evelt I)»m and return. Take Phoenix sleeper. 
or Qlobe Sleeper. Sundays, Tuesdays and Fridays, from Los 
Angi 

Trip fare $20.00. 

You can stop off at El Paso and go by street car into Old 
Mexico; or you can stop at New Orleans and visit many 
historic places. Mardi Gras festivities to Feb. 28th. 

For Railroad and Pullman Fares Ask Agents 

30 POST ST.— FERRY STATION— THIRD ST. STATION 
or Phone Sutter 4000 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1922 




Q)CIQt 







Busy Cupid 

THE marriage of Mrs. Estelle Houston 
Havens and Mr. Kenneth Monteagle 
took place Monday at St. Luke's Church. It 
was a small wedding, with only relatives 
and intimate friends present. The bride's 
first husband was the late Mr. Harold Hav- 
ens of Piedmont, and she has two little girls. 
Mr. Monteagle is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis F. Monteagle and a brother of Mr. 
Paige Monteagle. He was graduated from 
the University of California with the class 
of 1916, and is a member of the University, 
the San Francisco Golf and Country and 
the Olympic Clubs. 

— The marriage of Mrs. Emma Spreckels 
Ferris and Mr. Arthur Hutton took place 
January 14 in England at Nuffield Priory, 
the home of the bride in Surrey. The wed- 
ding was small, with only relatives there. 
Mr. and Mrs. Claus Augustus Spreckels and 
Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Eddy went from 
France to England for the wedding. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hutton are spending their honey- 
moon on the Riviera. Mrs. Hutton is the 
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Claus 
Spreckels of San Francisco. For a number 
of years she has lived in England, and her 
home, Nuffield Priory, is one of the beauti- 
ful historic estates of Surrey. 

— The marriage of Miss Margaret Isabel 
Wright and Lieutenant Harold Oliver Sand, 
United States Cavalry, will be solemnized 
shortly after Easter at the residence of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin 
Wright, in Monterey. Announcement of the 
engagement was made last week. The young 
officer was graduated from the West Point 
Military Academy in the class of 1920. 

— The marriage of Miss Ola Willett and 
Loren Tryon will be celebrated February 18 
at the Swedenborgian Church. As yet the 
other details of the wedding have not been 
determined. In the interim the bride-elect is 
being extensively entertained by her friends. 

— The gossip that Mrs. Billy Hitt is soon 
to wed a Virginian, this time a man of 
neither wealth nor social position, is inter- 
esting her Coronado friends. For several 
seasons the former Katherine Elkins, whose 
romance with the Duke d'Abruzzi, cousin of 
the King of Italy, was of international in- 
terest some years ago, has been coming to 
Coronado with her handsome husband, 
"Billy Hitt" of Washington. In the smart 
polo set the Hitts were favorites, and Mrs. 
Hitt was one of the women who inaugurated 
polo for women on this Coast some years 
ago at the Coronado Country Club polo 
field. The Hitts were divorced recently in 
Paris, and now comes the report that she 
is to marry a young Virginian who has been 
a business associate of the family for some 



time. Billy Hitt, considered at one time the 
handsomest man of Washington, is credited 
with a fortune of $10,000,000. He is a son 
of the late Congressman Hitt from Illinois. 
The Hitts were married in 1913. 

— With woodwardia fern, pink and white 
sweet peas and fluffy bows of tulle forming 
an effective background, the wedding of 
Miss Leonore Pfister and John Stuart Gor- 
don took place Tuesday evening in St. 
John's Presbyterian Church, Berkeley. The 
ceremony was performed by Rev. Dr. Fran- 
cis Russell, pastor of the church, and the 
beautiful young bride was given in marriage 
by her father. Dr. Joseph James Pfister. 
Several hundred guests, including relatives 
and friends of the couple from different 
parts of the state, were present at the cere- 
mony, which was followed by a reception 
and supper at the Pfister home in the college 
town. 

Luncheons 

— Mrs. Frank Fuller, who with Mr. Fuller 
and their children will soon leave for Eu- 
rope, was the guest of honor at a luncheon 
given Friday at the Woman's Athletic Club 
by the board of directors of the club. Mrs. 
Fuller was the luncheon guest of honor of 
Mrs. Alexander D. Keyes Wednesday, and 
of Mrs. Willard Wayman Friday. Mr. and 
Mrs. Andrew Welch gave a dinner for Mr. 
and Mrs. Fuller last week. 

— In honor of Miss Ola Willett, who is to 
become the bride of Lorin Howard Tyron, 
Miss Mabel Hathaway entertained at lunch- 
eon January 27. Miss Frances Johnson will 
give a tea at the James Ward home on 
Jackson street on February 3 for Miss Wil- 
lett, and Mrs. Mervyn O'Neill will give a 
luncheon in her honor February 8. 

— Entertaining members of her bridge 
club, Mrs. William Renwick Smedberg was 
a luncheon hostess Tuesday afternoon. The 
affair was held at the Town and Country 
Club. Later several rubbers of bridge were 
enjoyed. 

Teas 

— One of the handsome affairs of Satur- 
day was a tea at Laurel Court of the Fair- 
mont Hotel, where Mrs. George McGowan 
entertained some of her friends to meet 
Commander and Mrs. Albert Harold Rooks, 
who were recently married in Portland, 
where the attractive bride was well known 
in society. Commander Rooks is aid to 
Admiral Alexander Halstead. 
Bridge 

— An innovation in entertaining was the 
bridge breakfast given by Miss Helen Head 
on Saturday morning for Miss Louise Porter 
and Miss Cornelia Gwynn, two of the young 
girls whose engagements have been an- 



nounced recently. The guests assembled 
shortly after 9 o'clock in the morning for 
an old-fashioned breakfast, after which 
bridge was played until noontime. 

— Mrs. E. V. Smith, wife of Colonel 
Smith at the Presidio, was hostess to an 
attractive bridge tea given at her home this 
week. 

— Complimenting Miss Carrigan, Miss 
Barbara Sesnon was a bridge hostess Tues- 
day evening. Monday afternoon Miss Bar- 
bara Willett entertained her at a luncheon. 
Twenty-five guests accepted Miss Willett's 
hospitality. 

Dinners 

— H. M. S. Raleigh sailed for the South 
Saturday after a week's stay in port. The 
interchange of courtesies between the ship's 
officers and society people here and down 
the peninsula made the week unusually in- 
teresting in the social world. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Kingsbury gave 
a dinner Sunday night to celebrate Mr. 
Kingsbury's birthday. The guests included 
Mr. and Mrs. William Gwin, Dr. and Mrs. 
Charles Minor Cooper, Mr. Stanford Gwin 
and Mr. Arthur Goodall. 

— Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Lisberger were 
hosts at a large "southern" dinner at their 
home on Pacific avenue on Thursday, cele- 
brating the anniversary of their wedding. 
Many of the delicacies on the menu were 
sent from the old Lisberger plantation in 
Smithfield, Va., for the occasion. 

—Miss Betty Klink, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Klink, entertained a few guests 
at dinner at the Fairmont before the Wake- 
field party. There were several other din- 
ners given preceding the dance. 

— Miss Geraldine King, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Dale King of Piedmont, 
gave a large dinner-dance in the concert 
room at the Palace Hotel on Saturday even- 
ing, complimenting two of the season's debu- 
tantes, Miss Lawton Filer and Miss Mary 
Martin. Miss King made her debut last 
year, and left several months later with her 
parents for Europe. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George Newhall gave an 
informal dinner last week at the Hotel St. 




"8" 

Experience It In 
Action 



Pioneer Motor Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



January 28, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Francis, later attending Madame Pavlowa's 
performance at the Columbia. Their guests 
were Mr. and Mrs. John Drum, Mr. and 
Mrs. Mountford Wilson and Samuel Knight. 
Parties 

— Mrs. Warren Spieker entertained at a 
children's party Monday afternoon for her 
little son, Warren Spieker Jr., who cele- 
brated his third birthday. The party took 
place at the Spieker home in Buchanan 
street. 

— Century Club Hall in Franklin street 
was the scene of a merry gathering Satur- 
day evening when Miss Jean Wakefield, 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. Francis Wake- 
field and a belle of the subdebutante set, 
entertained more than two hundred of her 
young friends. Receiving with the hosts and 
their daughter were Major and Mrs. H. Doig 
and Mr. and Mrs. John Curran. 
In Town and Out 

— Mrs. C. C. Moore and her daughter, 
Miss Josephine Moore, and Miss Dorothy 
Crawford spent the last week at Paso 
Robles. Mr. Moore joined his family over 
the week-end. They returned to San Fran- 
cisco on Friday. 

— Miss Marian Huntington and Mrs. Julia 
Davenport left Monday for New York and 
Egypt. They will sail directly from New 
York to Alexandria. 

— Mr. Charlemagne Tower has arrived in 
San Francisco and has joined Mrs. Tower 
at the Fairmont Hotel. 

— Miss Jane Carrigan took her departure 
Thursday for the Eastern metropolis, where 
she will join Mrs. James Athearn Folgcr, 
with whom she is going abroad next month. 
They have engaged passage for February 4 
and will go directly to Naples. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William W. Ashe have re- 
turned to San Francisco after a sojourn of 
several months in New York and Washing- 
ton. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Benno Hart and Benno 
Hart Jr. will leave shortly for Santa Bar- 
bara to pass the remainder of the winter at 
the Samarkand. Another who is going south 
to visit this hostelry is Mrs. James King 
Steele. 



"COLONIALGLASSES" 

m:i\ be distinguished by their serai : 
btllty, octagon dc ol con- 

spicuous inn--: The nev i Imless 

i great Improvement over other 
types both in appearance and servfi 
ity adapted to each indh Idua I - > i 

incuts. 

w. i>. FennUnore A. R. Feaalmem 

j. \\ . DaTll 




lake *oJGoo* S 



-mi I rami.n. - 1 K 1 Po»t, MM MUaloa >!-. 

Berkeley - - - - 2106 shmturk Annl 
Oakland - i.'.'i nm»d»«y 



— Admiral and Mrs. J. S. McKean, com- 
mandante at Mare Island, are spending a 
few days at the Fairmont. Admiral McKean 
came down to welcome Admiral Peckham 
of the British fleet. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike have returned 
from Santa Barbara, where they passed the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius K. G. 
Billings. They were the guests at a dinner 
Friday evening at which Major and Mrs. 
Max Fleischman entertained. 
Intimations 

— Sympathy is being extended to the 
Misses Kathleen and Aileen Finnegan on 
the death of their aunt, Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Williams, which occurred last week at her 
home in San Mateo. 

— A number of informal affairs have been 
given during the last week in compliment 
to John W. Lawson, who is visiting here 
from his home in England. Mrs. Lawson 
and their children did not return to the 
United States with him, but will await his 
home-coming in London. Mr. Lawson will 
be here for two or three weeks longer. 

— Judge John F. Davis and his daughter, 
Miss Ruth Davis, left Wednesday for Wash- 
ington, D. C, where they will visit for about 
a month. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edmunds Lyman, who 
are occupying the Bothin home at Monte- 
cito, plan to go abroad next month. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Waterloo Ford, 
who are planning a several months' trip to 
Europe, will leave Saturday for New York 
and are sailing on the Lapland on or about 
the first of February. They are sailing on 
the same steamship as Mr. and Mrs. George 
T. Cameron, who have left for the Atlantic 
Coast. Mr. and Mrs. Cameron will go to 
Egypt. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fay and Charles 
Fay Jr. are en route to New York, sailing 
from there on February 4 for Italy with 
Senator Phelan. 

— Miss Jennie Blair will go abroad early 
in the spring, joining friends in Paris for a 
motor tour. 

Mrs. Daisy Canlield Danziger, one of 
the heirs to the Charles A. Canfield estate 
of $8,000,000. has sued her husband. J. M. 
Danziger. millionaire sportsman and asso- 
ciate of E. L. Doheny, for divorce. Two 
women, unnamed, were mentioned in the 
complaint and the places of alleged mis- 
conduct are the Danziger summer home at 
Del Mar, Cal., and an apartment house in 
New York City. Mr< Danziger is prominent 
in social circles in Southern California, and 
is known for her Red Cross work during the 
war. Mr. Danziger is vice-president of the 
Mexican Petroleum Company, and has been 
prominently identified with the Doheny oil 
interests throughout the world. He is said 
to be in New York now. The Danzigers 
were married in Salt Lake City on July 25. 
1901. and separ.i d March 15. 1918. ac- 
cording to the complaint. There are three 
children. The complaint states that Mrs. 
Danziger inherited a fourth of the estate of 
her father valued at $8,000,000. C. A. Can- 
6eld was prominent both as an oil and a 



mining man. Mr. Danziger later became 
manager of the estate. Mrs. Danziger asks 
that she be permitted to resume her maiden 
name. Cruelty is the basis of the suit. 



SOCIETY AT DEL MONTE 

— Week-end guests at the Del Monte 
Lodge at Pebble Beach were Mr. and Mrs. 
William H. Crocker, Miss Helen Crocker, 
W. W. Crocker, Miss Armsby, Raymond and 
Gordon Armsby, Clifford M. Weatherwax, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Judge, all of San 
Mateo; Mr. and Mrs. S. F. B. Morse and 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz of San Ma- 
teo; Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Hill Jr. of Los 
Altos; Mrs. Clark Thomson of Santa Bar- 
bara; Miss Gladys Tattersall and James L. 
Tattersall of Philadelphia. 

— A number of homes have been opened 
at Pebble Beach, and the residents there 
have been entertaining rather extensively. 
Among those who have been located at their 
pretty places and intend making long stays 
are Colonel and Mrs. J. Hudson Poole, Mr. 
and Mrs. S. W. Forsman, Mr. and Mrs. 
S. C. Tertie, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hickson, 
all of Pasadena; Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. 
Clark, who have been entertaining Com- 
mander and Mrs. William V. Van Antwerp 
of San Mateo. 



Fairmont Hotel Pleases the Particular 

The Fairmont Grill is a name which brings 
to the minds of those who know, a picture 
of an ideal place for luncheon, a place 
where service and congenial surroundings 
surround particular people. The menu con- 
tains all that the market affords, and only 
75 cents for lunch. The Saturday dinner- 
dance in the main dining room, $1.75, with- 
out any cover charge, is an unsurpassed at- 
traction. 



ELECTROLYSIS 

warts ami 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest Improved multiple needle ma- 
chine \v<-rk guaranteed. 

M X l» A M ST I V I B 
,r^ Km*, Balte 7ta Whltaej Bid* 

n.ikhmti. forte 1:1. rirafl Null. Baafe Bid*. 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Vour Hwh'i ■■Uimh 
at Oltj Booking Office 
lot Crocker Building 

Teirphnni* sutler 6130 

STAN'l.KY 



.1 F. BIRMINGHAM .Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • B • • 

RKMODELING Old Styles Into New 
■ • • • • • 

(.TOQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 
« • • • • • 

FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

• • • • • * 

EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1922 





iFINflNCIALy 

By P. N. BERINGER 




WE have recently had a conference of 
business men in San Francisco, 
called to discuss the American valuation 
plan, and which, in the end, resolved itself 
in an enthusiastic endorsement of the Ford- 
ney tariff. In view of the fact that California 
has made a vast advance in an industrial 
productive capacity it is rather odd some of 
her business men should consult their own 
pocket welfare rather than the welfare of 
the whole people in making such an endorse- 
ment. California's annual output of agri- 
cultural, mineral and manufactured com- 
modities now totals $2,716,565,667. Cali- 
fornia is going forward most rapidly along 
industrial lines. This is the industrial age 
all over this country. We must have mar- 
kets. A high tariff at home never yet cre- 
ated a market abroad. The question is for 
us to settle as to what we are going to do 
with our surplus in agricultural and indus- 
trial production? 

* * * 

And now we have Herbert Hoover giving 
us advance information as to an impending 
strike in the soft coal mining regions of the 
Eastern states, by April next. Operators and 
miners are just spoiling for a "show down 
fight." And, in the meanwhile, the public 
will suffer. It is interesting to note that 
should a strike be called there would be but 
forty-seven days of coal on hand to supply 
all demands. The union officials and the 
operators rather welcome the strike as a 
trial of strength. The rank and file in the 
unions and the people at large will suffer, 
while the contending officials have their curi- 
osity satisfied. It is to be supposed that, in 
some far distant future, the employer and 
the employed will just naturally understand 
that a lock-out or a strike is a loss which is 
never made up. Probably the people, who 
pay the bill, should be thankful that the 
strike is called in April, as there will be 
less inconvenience and suffering entailed. 

This is a day of mergers in banks. The 
Mercantile Trust has just taken into the fold 
the First National Bank of Berkeley and the 
Union Bank of Savings of the same place. 
This makes the combined resources of the 
banks $95,000,000. The Mercantile Trust 
Company has just elected a very strong 
board of directors. 

It should give San Francisco people a 
great deal of pleasure to see the renewed 
activity in real estate circles. So far, this 
increasing demand is largely as regards 
home sites, but the demand for farm lands 
is showing itself as well. There isn't any 
doubt that housing accommodations is still 



an evil demanding correction. With the 
coming of spring, there is sure to be a build- 
ing boom on both sides of the Bay. In Oak- 
land this boom started in the latter part of 
last summer. When people begin to talk of 
building homes, you may rest assured that 
better times are not on the way, but have 
already arrived. 

Nineteen-twenty-one was far from being a 
good year in the insurance business on the 
Coast, and San Francisco was not exempt 
as to a decrease in business and an increase 
in losses. Probably no year was quite as 
bad as 1921 except the year of big losses, 
1906. But what good is served by post- 
mortems? The insurance men should start 
making up their losses by a freer use of 
printer's ink. Advertise. 

* * * 

The Fire Underwriters' Association of the 
Pacific will hold its annual meeting in the 
Merchants' Exchange, on February 7 and 8. 

Clarence Elton Allan is now manager of 
the Pacific Coast department of the Liver- 
pool and London and Globe Insurance Com- 
pany. Mr. Allan will be remembered as 
with the American Eagle, Fidelity Phenix 

and the Continental. 

* •¥ * 

Shipping — Perhaps, although the subject 
has been repeatedly treated by the daily 
newspapers, a word as to the object of the 
big shipping consolidation should be said in 
this column. The object is the linking of 
maritime interests from San Diego to Seattle 
in a great single operating organization. The 
Pacific Mail, which is owned jointly by the 
W. R. Grace Co. and the American Inter- 
national Corporation; the Admiral Steam- 
ship Co., which is controlled by H. F. Alex- 
ander and D. J. Jackling, interests that are 
allied with E. L. Doheney of Los Angeles in 
a twenty-million-dollar combination to oper- 
ate an off-shore fleet; A. and John D. 
Spreckels, who are the owners of the line 
between the Pacific Coast and Australia, are 
the large interests to be affected by any 
combination that may be made. These major 
interests are certainly vitally involved and, 
if such a combination as that proposed by 
Mr. Fleishhacker is possible, much money 
will be saved and lost motion taken up. 
Shipping men, however, are not sanguine as 
to the results of the various conferences be- 
ing held. 

Ship building on the Coast is in a bad 
way. Some of the big yards are being taken 
care of by about as small a force as it is 
possible and still remain in existence. 



Among transportation men the appoint- 
ment of Mr. James B. Duffy as general pas- 
senger agent for the Coast, for the Santa 
Fe, has been received with a great deal of 
satisfaction. There are very few men in the 
transportation service of the rail lines of the 
country who are so favorably known by the 
traveling public or who have so many 
friends. Mr. Duffy has always been an asset 
to his road. He is a man of marked ability 
as an executive. 

Mining — The old Union hydraulic mine, 
near Douglas City, has passed under lease 
to T. D. Arbuckle. The Lorenz hydraulic 
mine, near Weaverville, has had a very 
profitable season. This is the largest hydrau- 
lic producer in Trinity County. 

Fred R. Kellogg of Los Angeles has 
bought the control of the old Beardsley mine 
near Taylorsville. Vigorous development 
work is to be undertaken. 

Abroad — The news from Great Britain 
and France is of a more reassuring char- 
acter than last week's correspondence 
seemed to indicate. It is fair to assume that 
every effort will be made by the powers par- 
ticipating to make the economic conference 
a success. The participation or the resigna- 
tion of one man, or of many men, will not 
be allowed to mar the results to be obtained. 
Briand's resignation had its effect, it is true, 
but already the evil that was supposed to 
descend on the conference has been almost 
dissipated. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Export trade from the Pacific Coast is 
improving and the exporter and importer is 
correspondingly more optimistic as to the 
future. San Francisco merchants are mak- 
ing the discovery that Mexico is a very 
lively market just now and that in the fu- 
ture it is to be a much livelier one. There 
is a big trade development impending with 
Mexico, and with recognition there is sure 
to be an almost immediate increase in trade 
relations. 

* * * 

India and Egypt are reported as seething 
with rebellion. Now, that the Irish question 
is at least settled for some time, the British 
will be able to give their undivided attention 
to Indian and Egyptian matters. The Indian 
situation is very delicate, and for the first 
time in history there seems something of a 
movement in concert in opposition to Brit- 
ish rule. In Egypt there is revolt, but the 
British will soon bring about order in the 
Khedivate. 

Money in Grain 

$12.50 buys guaranteed option on 10,000 bushels 
of wheat or corn. No further risk. A movement 
of 5c from price gives you an opportunity to 
take $500 ; 4c, $400 ; 3c. $300, etc. Write for 
particulars and free market letter. 

l.NVESlOKS' DAILY GUIDE 

Southwest Branch, Desk CO, 1004 Baltimore Ave. 

Kansas City, Mo, 



January 28, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 




0M0BILE 



Z29 



Rise in Auto Prices Looked For 

In the opinion of many Western factory 
representatives and local dealers, the two 
leading factors contributing to general pub- 
lic interest in cars at this time were the new 
low price levels and numerous improvements 
in cars, giving greater durable value for the 
money than at any other period of the in- 
dustry. Manufacturers are looking forward 
to a satisfactory selling year. To meet this 
prospective demand a considerably larger 
output than in 1921 has been planned for 
many of the more popular and moderate 
priced types. Manufacturers are chiefly look- 
ing forward to price stabilization. There is 
no question that the frequent price changes 
last year had a disturbing effect. The re- 
ductions made during show week have natu- 
rally raised hopes that more will follow be- 
fore spring. 

It has been stated that, to meet competi- 
tion, some cars are actually selling too cheap 
and that some of the cars which have been 
materially priced down are likely to make 
an advance before June. 



Public Interest Evinced 

The New York national automobile show, 
which closed with an astonishingly large at- 
tendance and was marked by continued 
public interest, showed that careful business 
methods are being studied by automobile 
dealers more than ever before. One of the 
features of the show was the interest dis- 
played in the multitude of motor car acces- 
sories. There has never been a larger or 
more varied exhibition of this character. 
Electric signaling devices were particularly 
numerous, indicating that motorists are using 
these helpful aids very freely as an addi- 
tional safeguard on the highway. 

Heating appliances for cars in cold 
weather are also more generally used. Two 
or three years ago a heater as standard 
equipment was a rarity. One type is now 
installed as regular equipment by fifty-four 
manufacturers. These heaters are readily 
adaptable to every type of car. provide heat 
control for both open as well as closed 
cars, and operate without expense to the 
owner, as they draw the heat from the ex- 
haust. 



Workers Not Producing 

Millions of workers in the United States 
are not producing anything at present be- 
cause they are unwilling to produce goods 
on conditions which the world can meet, 
according to Arthur R. Marsh, a member of 
the New York Cotton Exchange, speaking 
before the Society of Automotive Engineers 
at a meeting held in connection with the 



National Auto Show. Furthermore, he said, 
wage shrinkages amounting to billions of 
dollars have been encountered by other 
workers in many industries, so that demand 
for automobiles is not sufficient to keep the 
industry operating at the highest capacity. 



OXYGEN REQUIRED BY EVEREST 
CLIMBERS 

If Mount Everest is to be climbed at all 
by General C. G. Bruce's party in this year 
of 1922, it will be in May or June "before 
the monsoon breaks," says the experts. The 
reconnoissance last summer settled the ques- 
tion of weather, for there was much rain 
and fog in July, while late in September the 
onset of winter drove the invaders from the 
field. The grand assault is, therefore, to be 
made before mid-summer, and perhaps while 
spring still lingers in Tibet. The approach 
will be very cold, but there will be no sum- 
mer floods, as there were in 1921, to ob- 
struct it. The start will be from Darjeeling 
about March 21. It would be foolish to 
make light of the difficulties of the expedi- 
tion. 

Without the aid of oxygen in some port- 
able container the mountain can probably 
not be climbed. There are Alpinists who 
regard the Everest expedition as worse than 
a forlorn hope. A few years ago Dr. A. M. 
Kellas, who was familiar with the loftier 
Himalayas and had made notable ascents, 
read before the Royal Geographical Society 
a paper in which he took the view that with- 
out oxygen to fill the lungs of the climber 
the very highest peaks could not be con- 
quered. He calculated that at the summit 
of Everest the supply of oxygen was only 
one-third of that at sea level; therefore it 
must be reinforced artificially in the last 
four or five thousand feet. Dr. Kellas re- 
viewed some of the balloon ascents to high 
altitudes as pertinent to his subject. "In 
Glaisher and Coxwell's ascent to 29.000 
feet" (almost the height of Everest to a foot) 
"both men," he said, "became paralyzed, 
and then Glaisher became insensible." Cox- 
well, helpless to raise his hands, opened the 
valve-rope with his teeth in some manner, 
and gradually the rise of the balloon was 
stopped. In Tissandier's ascent (there were 
two men with him) oxygen was carried. 
Singularly, all three men were paralyzed at 
27,950 feet before they could raise the tubes 
of oxygen to their lips. Tissandier fainted. 
When he came to. his companions were 



dead and the balloon was rapidly descend- 
ing. Dr. Kellas observed: 

"The conclusion from these balloon as- 
cents must inevitably be that an ascent of 
Mount Everest without adventitious aids 
would be quite impossible if the physiologi- 
cal conditions of mountaineers and balloon- 
ists are comparable. They are not compar- 
able, however, as the balloonist has no 
opportunity of becoming acclimatized to 
high altitudes." 

On the other hand, the mountaineer who 
attempts Everest must undergo violent exer- 
tion to chop his way up and drag himself 
toward his goal. Dr. Kellas came to the con- 
clusion that even with the aid of oxygen (he 
did not indicate how it could be carried) 
"the climber near the summit of Mount 
Everest will probably be on his last reserves 
in the way to acclimatization and strength." 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

LUNCHEON 75c 
Served Daily — 1 1 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large 

menu, which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

FRENCH DINNER $1.50 

Including tax. week days and Sundays, 

5 to !) p. m. 

I) A N ( I N (i 

121 BUSH STREET, AJBOVE KEARN"2 
rim n. ■: Douglas 2411 



I (pen Every Day from 8 a. in. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

Tin* Most Popular Restaurant 
05 Tost Street, Near Market Street 

I'linnr Kearny 4."i3fi San IruiuKfii, Cnllf. 

Mimu Berved n la Carta. Also Re«ulnr 

French a ml Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Beat Equipped ami Most MODERN 
GAHAGH Weal of Chicago 

The Century 



Two Bloefcfl (Ml 1 nlon Square 

070 Port Street San Francteco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and J 



Phone*.: *=iittcr :t lfi9. Kearn> !!»;* 

United Flower & Supply Cojnc. 

PfXmiSTS 

W« iron- oar own *l«ck and, with rxtrn- 

»i\ e nur«rrif< lo draw frum. run rire 

until tin I valnew. It will p«J > »u M 

il*w oar flower- n'.J prtre-.. 



I h Bush Street 



San Francism 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1922 




PlyEASURE/S WAND 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Laugh Week at Crpheum 

All for fun this week. Funny men, funny 
women, funny mules. Lilian Shaw is still 
in our midst, better than ever! The Clarke 
and Bergman Revue remains to entertain. 
Morris and Campbell also are here for an- 
other week with their good act. Eddie Buz- 
zell's "Man of Affairs" is one of the bright- 
est bits seen for a long time. He has an 
excellent little play and is an admirable 
actor. Buck and Bubbles, the negro song 
and dance pair, are true to type and occa- 
sion much mirth. The Darling Sisters are 
pretty and graceful. Beatrice Sweeney does 
aerial stunts. Fink's mules are consistently 
comical. 



Colombia 

Miss Robson's delightful comedy, "It Pays 
to Smile," continues to attract large audi- 
ences. The genuine and hearty personality 
of this popular aclress will always insure her 
a faithful following. She has a good com- 
pany, too. Next week Oliver Morosco's 
"Wait Till We're Married," with Terry Duffy 
as star, will come to chase away the blues. 



Players' Club 

This is the last week of "Le Bourgeois 
Gentilhomme." Friday the Players will put 
on Dan Totheroh's one-act play, "Exiles"; 
"Fourteen," with clever Ann O'Day, and 
Ben Purrington's play, "Charles the Simple." 



Alcazar's Rich Comedy 

You know the kind of person in the audi- 
ence whose explosive and uncontrollable 
"ha-ha-ha!" shatters the silence after every- 
one else has left off laughing; a general 
turning of heads and amused titters follow, 
and the wife of the solitary laugher pretends 
she is not with him. Seldom does it happen 
that the unfortunate one is a dramatic critic; 
the fine edge has been worn off his sense 
of humor long, long ago. A tolerant grin is 
about as far as he can go. But listen : The 
writer of these same words, your very own 
critic who obeys no wand but Pleasure's, 
disgraced the Page in above fashion whilst 
witnessing the Alcazar production of "The 
Beautiful Liar." Ned Doyle's portrayal of 
Edgar Blodgett, the nervous bridegroom, 
was what did it. A captivating little comedy 
this, with the pick of the Alcazar company 
playing in it, and a new member as well. 
Miss Anne Berryman is welcome; she is 
pretty, chic, intelligent, and uses her voice 
well. Anna MacNaughton as the boarding 
house keeper of theatrical reminiscences was 
perfect in the part. Florence Spurrier was 
a laughable boarding house slavey; Ben 
Erway quite at home as the funny man; 
Richard Allen acceptable as the unexpected 
husband; Frederick Green an admirable 
clergyman; Marie Dunkle never better than 



in the part of Katherine Sumner; Charles 
Yule a cheerfully correct attorney; Dudley 
Ayres, handsome and full of fun as the de- 
sirable Phillip Bennett, and last of all, 
sweetest of all, most adorably charming of 
all, Miss Gladys George as the Beautiful 
Liar. The poker game in the boarding house 
parlor was an excellent piece of work. In 
fact, the play is filled with amusing situa- 
tions, and is quite the best thing our popular 
local players have done this year. 



week, but a cheerful prologue and Wallace 
at the organ make up for the loss. 



Imperial 

The audience decidedly approved "The 
Rosary" at its premier showing this week. 
A small-town play with a large human in- 
terest is this story, which runs the gamut 
of passions and frailty to a logical climax. 

Jane Novak, with her whimsical person- 
ality, could not be improved upon as Vera, 
while the villain. Father Kelly and Bruce 
Wilton have been carefully selected from the 
best movie material. Much can be said in 
favor of the direction and locals, a faithful 
adherence to the book being constantly in 
evidence. The mob scenes are particularly 
good and the story progresses with great 
evenness. The gradual development betrays 
the careful work of both director and the 
players. 

Everyone should see this picture. Noth- 
ing of the super-spectacular is offered, but 
good, faithful work makes the film thor- 
oughly enjoyable. 



Slrongheart at California 

We used to think Selig put out some fine 
animal films, but in his palmiest days he 
never approached "The Silent Call." Strong- 
heart is a wonderful dog. The direction, 
support and settings are adequate to make 
this the finest film of its kind. While the 
picture bears evidence of having been cut in 
places, enough of the continuity is retained 
to preserve the technique of the director. 

Heller, as usual, did credible with his or- 
chestra, though the East Bay Male Chorus 
was disappointing and Simonde failed to 
appear as per programed. Nevertheless, the 
short fill-ins were sufficiently interesting to 
round out a good bill. 



Jackie Coogan's Granada Picture 

We have been hearing a great deal lately 
about the automobile Jackie Coogan owns, 
the money he^makes, etc. Well, he's worth 
it. My Boy" has a number of features 
which are novel and a theme with interest. 
What a blessing, too, that the "sob stuff" 
has been cut to a minimum! Jackie's two 
supporting characters are well chosen, and 
the scenes have a truly characteristic envir- 
onment. We can stand a number of these 
films. 

Severi has been left off the program this 



Laughter and Thrills at Alcazar 

More mysterious than "The Bat" and 
more amusing than "Up In Mabel's Room" 
is "The Haunted House," which the Alcazar 
will present for the first time in the West 
beginning Sunday afternoon, January 29. 
This play has been aptly characterized as 
"the comedy with a shiver," and it contains 
an appeal to the risibles. 

Gladys George and Dudley Ayres will ap- 
pear in the leading roles. In the support will 
be Ben Erway, Anne Berryman, Charles 
Yule, Marie Dunkle, Richard C. Allan and 
Ned Doyle. 



Lecture on Anatole France 

Dr. Aurelia Henry Rcinhardt, president of 
Mills College, will lecture in the Paul Elder 
Gallery Tuesday afternoon, January 31, at 
2:30 o'clock, on "The Work and Art of 
Anatole France." The event will be for the 
benefit of the Mills College Endowment 
Fund, to which the financial proceeds will 
accrue. The lecture is under the direction 
of Paul Elder. 



Orpheum Next Week 

In next week's bill at the Orpheum, Wil- 
liam Gaxton will appear in "Kisses." Ma- 
deline and Dorothy Cameron, the elite of 
sister dancing acts, will be co-headliners. Al 
Lydell and Carleto W. Macy will present 
"Old Cronies." Dane Claudius and Lillian 
Scarlet will appear in "The Call of the 
Sixties." Al Wohlman will score in mono- 
logue. The Five Avalons of the double wire 
will do some astonishing stunts. Remaining 
for a second week will be Eddie Buzzell & 
Co. in "A Man of Affairs," and Nal Nazarro 
with Buck and Bubbles in their comedy. 



Baldness — The more a man's head gets to 
look like an egg, the more responsive he be- 
comes to the influence of a chicken. 



SAM FR/tHCISCO I 



T«E &«T W w NAUtPfculu* 




MA ™.f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



January 28, 1922 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



A STERNER POLICY 

"No one went out to India more sympa- 
thetically inclined toward the gradual devel- 
opment of some sort of a popular form of 
government in India, than the present Vice- 
roy, Lord Reading, so well remembered as 
British Ambassador at Washington. But the 
former Lord Chief Justice has been driven, 
like Field Marshal Lord Allenby in Egypt, 
to announce, in the most weighty and final 
manner, that Great Britain will not tolerate 
any longer the cult of a fanatical and purely 
disruptive type of nationalism, and that the 
moment has come for the Government to 
exercise its full strength for the protection 
of all law-abiding people in India, from in- 
timidation and for the prevention of wrong- 
doing by political groups." So says the Lon- 
don Mail. 



STOCK OPPORTUNITY TO RAILROAD 

MEN 



NO SOLDIER BONUS THIS YEAR 

The New York World says: "President 
Harding is likely to be overruled in his ef- 
forts to obtain cash bonus legislation for 
ex-service men. He has but little support in 
Congress for such a proposition. The pay- 
ment of the minimum estimate, $1,600,- 
000,000, would necessitate a rate of taxation 
too heavy for the Republicans to approve 
on the initiation of a campaign. 



MEAT AND CANCER 

Vegetarians say that because of their ab- 
stinence from meat the native Africans do 
not suffer from malignant neoplasms. They 
could also have stated that the Eskimos, 
whose diet is based mainly on flesh foods, 
are as immune to cancer as the Africans, 
assert medical authorities. 



TECHAU TAVERN AMATEURS CREATE 
A FURORE 

All the merry souls of San Francisco, it 
would seem, congregate at Techau Tavern 
on Tuesdays and Fridays, which are given 
over to the now famous "Amateur" nights. 
Hilarity, fun and foolishness reign supreme 
on these evenings. It is San Francisco's 
nearest approach to the olden, joyous, care- 
free days; especially when the after-theater 
crowds literally pour in to this famous ren- 
dezvous and add to the general spirit of 
camaraderie, humor and light-heartedness. 
There is nothing quite like it in the West. 
After-theater supper parties are becoming 
increasingly popular. To add the finishing 
touch to an evening out, Techau Tavern any 
evening in the week is undeniably the place 
to go. Its informal atmosphere, its general 
gayety and the exquisite refreshments served 
lend a charm that is irresistible. 

Lucky dances are a feature of every 
evening. Ladies receive Gruenhagen's choc- 
olates, and the men receive Melachrino 
cigarettes. There is no competition to these 
dances — it is merely a matter of luck, and 
everyone has an equal chance. 



Southern Pacific Presents an Admirable 
Plan to Its Employes 

Employes of the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany are now given the opportunity to buy 
shares of the capital stock of the company 
on easy terms, according to a statement just 
issued by Wm. Sproule, president of the 
company, to the employes. The plan pro- 
vides that on application of the employes 
the company will buy the stock in the open 
market, deducting the purchase cost in small 
amounts from their monthly pay. 

The company makes no appeal to em- 
ployes to purchase stock. No employes will 
be either favored or discriminated against 
because of his purchase or failure to pur- 
chase stock under this purely voluntary plan. 
Employe purchasers, or their estates, are 
protected against loss in event of death or 
permanent disability or in case of leaving 
the service of the company, voluntarily or 
otherwise. 

The company has no stock in its treasury. 
All of its stock is in the hands of the public 
(about 54,000 holders), and the present 
proposal is intended to make it easy for 
employes to buy Southern Pacific stock in 
the open market. 

The company, of course, cannot control 
the future market price of the stock or the 
amount it will be able to pay in dividends, 
as earnings largely decide that. 

Any employe may apply for the purchase 
of from one to fifteen shares of stock, ac- 
cording to his ability to pay for it. If, after 
having begun the purchase of a less number 
than fifteen shares, an employe desires to 
buy additional shares to the limit of fifteen, 
that can be arranged for him. After having 
completed any specified purchase the em- 
ploye may then begin to buy additional 
shares, but under no circumstances may an 
employe be buying, under this plan, a total 
of more than fifteen shares at any one time, 
but he is not limited to the total number he 
may finally purchase. 

The stock will be paid for by the employe 
at the rate of $5 a month on each share 
until the purchase is completed, such pay- 
ments to be deducted from his wages once 
a month. However, the employe has the 
privilege of paying off in a lump sum the 
unpaid balance of his stock at any time. 

The company will charge the employe 6 
per cent interest on the cost of the stock 
purchased for his account. 



Fowl Play — An expedition was sent to 
one of the southern states to observe an 
eclipse of the sun. 

The day before the event one of its mem- 
bers said to an old negro belonging to the 
house where he was staying: "Tom, if you 
will watch your chickens tomorrow morning 
you'll find that they'll all go to roost at 1 1 
o'clock." 

Tom was skeptical, but, sure enough, at 
the time predicted the sky darkened and the 
chickens retired to roost. The negro, amazed 
beyond measure, sought out the scientist. 

"Perfessor," he asked, "how long ago did 
you know dem chickens would go to roost?" 

"About a year ago," he replied with a 
smile. 

"Well, if dat don't beat all! Why, per- 
fessor, a year ago dem chickens wasn't even 
hatched!" — Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph. 



Wedding Prostata- The choicest variety 
ilecl from al Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Poet and Powell Sts. 



Hard to Please— Say." protested the dis- 
gusted patron, "this show is not worth two 
dollars." 

"Didn't you see the leading man embrace 
the leading lady in the third act?" asked the 
manager. 

"Of course I did." 

"Well, he squeezed her so hard he broke 
a rib. What do you want for two dollars?" 
— Birmingham Age-Herald. 



Beauty Culture Taught 

Enroll Now ' 

Individual Instructions 

25 Years in Business 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 



Authorized Simonizing Stations 




rig and Upholstering Depart- 
furnlsh est. 
on any work. 

If v.-ur office or horn* furniture I 
dull <»r d SlmotUter. 

California Simonizing Co. 



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- i n I r in. i-' •> 

Ph. r 



lirmdln-ny 
Onklaml 



Looted in the Ktn:in< i.il l>iMri<I 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

^\l \l>- Ml i; MM < I \l TV 
Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to - 
.-.i.x s;u liimrnm si.. Oor, befdeadorfl 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1922 



"Doc, your motor is dead." 

"Dear me," said the eminent surgeon. 
"Then I suppose it is too late to operate?' 
— Louisville Courier-Journal. 



A Powerful Incentive — Kriss — How does 
the doctor manage to have his bills paid so 
promptly? 

Kross — He gives a prescription with every 
receipt as a bonus. — New York Sun. 



"Have you broken off your engagement?" 
"Yes. The wretch told me he was a book- 
maker, but I found out that he was only an 
author!" — Klods Hans (Copenhagen). 



Mr. Henpeck — I am thinking of taking a 
cottage hereabouts. 

Farmer — But don't you think the climate 
would disagree with your wife? 

Mr. Henpeck — Disagree! It wouldn't 
dare. — Pearson's Weekly. 



Inheritance — When a large inheritance is 
unevenly divided, where there's a will, 
there's a wail. 

Rule of Average — Hokus — The secret of 
a happy married life consists of going 50-50. 

Pokus — But the octogenarian who marries 
a flapper believes in going 80-20. 



Very Much Afrayed — "Goin' in that house 
over there?" said the first tramp. 

"I tried that house last week. I ain't goin' 
there any more," replied tramp No. 2. 

" 'Fraid on account of the dog?" 

"Me trousers are." 

"Trousers are what?" 

"Frayed on account of the dog." — Los 
Angeles Times* 



The Sarcastic Farmer — Henry Ford said 
at a dinner in Dearborn: 

"The American farmer is the most recep- 
tive man in the world if you approach him 
with practical ideas — tractors, say. If you 
approach him with ideas of no value, he's 
apt to be sarcastic. 

" 'Friend,' said a college professor to a 
farmer one summer day, 'what are you feed- 
ing to those hogs?' 

" 'Corn,' said the farmer. 

" 'Are you feeding the corn, friend, wet 
or dry?' 

" 'Dry.' 

" 'Friend, friend, don't you know that if 
you wet the corn the hogs will digest it in 
half the time?' 

"The farmer laughed. 

" 'Look here,' he said, 'how much do you 
think a hog's time is worth?* " — Detroit Free 
Press. 



LONG FAMILY RECORD 

Viscount Lascelles, who is to marry the 
Princess Mary of England, was wounded 
thrice in the Battle of the Somme. 

"He holds the D.S.O. with bar and the 
French Croix de Guerre," says the London 
Mail. 

"The family goes back to John de Las- 
celles of Hinderskelfe, Yorkshire, of the 
time of Edward II., in the fourteenth cen- 
tury. All the successive heads of the family 
have been good Yorkshiremen, taking an 
active part in the affairs, local and Parlia- 
mentary, of the county," says the London 
Daily News. 

"One of the Lascelles family, Francis, 
was M. P. for the North Riding of Yorkshire 
in 1653, and was a colonel in the Parlia- 
mentary Army. 

"The fortunes of the family were founded 
by two Parliamentary soldiers who emi- 
grated to the West Indies at the Restoration 
and came back very wealthy men. 

"As the great fortune of the Clanricardes 
was bequeathed to Viscount Lascelles, he 
lacks nothing of this world's goods." 



Enough Names to Go Round — Liza be- 
longed to a large family. Even on the plan- 
tation, where large families were the rule, 
the number of her brothers and sisters was 
a by-word. One morning Liza appeared at 
the "Big House," where she was intrusted 
with the daily churning, with the informa- 
tion that her family circle had been still 
further enlarged. 

"We's got a new baby 't our house," she 
announced. 

"Have you really!" exclaimed her mis- 
tress. "Boy or girl?" 

"It's a girl." 

"Well, well; another girl! Have they 
named her yet?" 

"Yes'm," replied the small darky. "She 
name' Frances. Mammy say she didn't have 
none name' Frances." — Harper's Magazine. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



■ 


'" r vlf„ ~ 

1 ^- ' 

'" i :.>*** ■ ; 

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FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1G26-1623 Market Street 

llet ween 1' 'ranklin antl Go ugh 
Telephone Turk 271 



duality 1866-56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Iturlinprame Redwood City Menlo Furk 

Sun Mateo Woodside 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

Son Francisco Phone Market !)lfl 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 

to ] pie who write. Frank criticism and 

revision are also available, 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Eyes 
Bother 

You? 



oa 



Guaranteed 

Work at 

27 7th St. 



DR. J. P. JUHL 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurttnce Rrokcr 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 3S)1 San Francisco 



Fire, Earthquake, Automobile, Vsc and Occupancy, Riot and Civil Commotion, 
Explosion, Plate Glass, Fidelity and Surety Bond 

INSURANCE 

THE LONDON & LANCASHIRE INSURANCE CO., Ltd. 

I.OXDOX, ENGLAND Incorporated 1861 

ORIENT INSURANCE CO. of Hartford, Conn. 

Incorporated 1867 

LAW UNION & ROCK Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of London — Founded 1806 

LONDON & LANCASHIRE INDEMNITY COMPANY of America 

Organized under the lows of the State of New York — Incorporated January, 1915 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT: 332 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
GEO. ORMOND SMITH, Manager 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1S17) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 31st 
-March, 1921 




.$ 24,S26,000.00 
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VOL, 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1922 



No. 5 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISE!: is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco, Calif, Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francis,,,, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter - . 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C-, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
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NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— We have so many summery winters in San Francisco that a 

frosty one makes us think the North Pole has slipped a few pegs. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The Shipping Board salaries have been cut. That is easy, but 
how are the taxpayers going to get back the billions the high- 
salaried officials squandered? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The United States will save a billion in five years by disarm- 
ament, but will it go into long credits for farmers and other sky- 
rocket schemes? 

— Is Fatty Arbuckle's trial, under the personal supervision of 

District Attorney Brady, an engagement for life and fifty years 

after? Poor Fatty. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Americans are reading fewer books every year, wail the book- 
sellers. But they're none the worse for that, judging by the kind 

of books that are read. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Hiram Johnson has received a $25,000 legal fee for his serv- 
ices in the New York traction litigation. What a lot of money those 
political lawyers let go by them. 

* * * 

— Is it getting to be that people with a strong political pull can 
do anything and get away with it? Ordinary citizens can do noth- 
ing but pay higher taxes and go poor. 

* ¥ * 

— Can a man after he has passed 50 play football? asks one of 
our local sport reporters. He certainly can if he's tired of life. Golf 
or a rocking chair would fit him better. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 
—The movie pictures of the Wild West astonish European fans, 
declare foreign critics. No wonder, when the Wild Westerners them- 
selves are more astonished than anybody. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

—Police Judge O'Brien's severity on auto speeders would be 
more commendable if he played no favorites. But police courts are 
only stepping-stones to the higher bench. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

—It is legal to transport liquor to warehouses, but not from 
them. But that decision, like every one on prohibition, is only a 
fresh boom for the bootleggers. You can't stop the lively birds. 



— Most of the owners of whisky in warehouses who are stopped 
from claiming it by the Supreme Court decision, had made up their 
minds anyhow if it ever came back as anything but cold water it 
would be a miracle. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Clergymen are criticizing the money-mad matron who goes out 
to earn a salary when not necessary to the home. How about all 
the young women with good homes who spend every cent they earn 
on fine clothes? 

— The enmeshing of Los Angeles politicians in dry raids makes 
local gossips say that two Stale Senators are protected in boot- 
legging. Could it be because they voted for the King bill and higher 
taxes? Oh, impossible! 

— Supervisor "Noisy Bill" Scott was hot in the Board debate on 
Monday as an ex-service man, demanding liberal treatment of vet- 
erans. How many war fronts did Bill fight on while drawing two 
salaries as supervisor and legislator? 

— Margaret Mary Morgan, our woman Supervisor, can't stand 
the ungrammatical jawing of her male colleagues, and advises them 
not to make themselves "ridiculous." Does she want the Board to 
quit? Talk is their stock in trade. 

— P. H. McCarthy took part in the Supervisors' discussion on 
Monday, relative to emergency appropriations for the unemployed. 
He advocated higher rates of pay. That kind of advocacy is what 
has thrown millions out of work. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The national agricultural conference at Washington has gone 
on record as demanding reduction on pretty nearly everything the 
granger has to sell himself. As a profiteer, the farmer is as quick 
on the trigger as the best of them. 

— Supervisor Dick Welch is going to locate a million families on 
the 30,000 acres of duck marshes in South San Francisco, if he 
has to go all the way to Iowa and lassoo them. Low taxes are 
what will bring them, Supervisor. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Supervisor Warren Shannon did not make his intended report 
on Monday of what he accomplished in creating Oriental trade on 
his late sea voyage, for which the Board of Supervisors appro- 
priated $2000. He will be busy writing a St. Patrick's Day poem 
till March 17. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Why should ordinary street sweepers get $6 a day, and ex- 
soldiers, paid out of the $25,000 emergency fund, whatever is 
handed them? Of course, the trouble is that the $6 a day for street 
sweepers means "union street sweepers." Vet this is an open shop 
town — nominally. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




In Washington, D. C, our old friend, the 
The Plumber Again plumber, must be as big a profiteer as here, 
and the officials who supervise his work an 
unconscionable set of political grafters. Washington is governed 
by Congress. One would think the seat of the United States Gov- 
ernment would be an improvement on other afflicted parts of the 
nation, but apparently it is as bad, if not worse. 

Senatcr King of Utah, the other day in the Senate, read a letter 
from a complaining contractor on the reasons of the building crisis 
in Washington. The financing of building loans, together with in- 
terest on mortgages, amounted approximately to 50 per cent of the 
construction of the houses themselves, the letter writer said. 

Before obtaining a permit to build in Washington, the name of 
the contractor was required. If the owner finds it necessary to dis- 
charge the constructor, another permit is necessary, and if the dis- 
charged constructor be a union man, or had influence with the 
Commissioners, he can hold up the building construction indefinitely. 

Senator King called attention to the plumbing trust. Several 
complaints of discrimination had been made to him. One com- 
plainant told the Senator he had worked at plumbing eight years, 
but would not be allowed to do anything connected with plumbing. 
He would have to employ a regular registered plumber at a rate of 
$8.50 a day, and wait till the registered plumber was good and 
ready. To qualify for a permit, the complainant said, he would 
have to pass a long-drawn-out examination and put up a bond of 
$2000, and deposit with the District $50. 

"I mention these facts," said the complainant, "to show how it is 
possible for the unions to hold out the non-union man and also 
form a barricade for the contractors to hide behind. It makes it 
practically impossible to bring an honest man in and let him do his 
work. I will say a man should be permitted to do work that is 
afterwards inspected by the engineers of the District. If the work 
is not right, the engineers will not pass it until it is made right. 
Upon a little investigation of the plumbers' code you will readily 
see that this is a union man's paradise." 

"It will be seen," observed Senator King, "that if robbery of this 
kind is permitted, it will greatly aggravate the building situation. 
The letters show a form of profiteering so ugly and brutal that suit- 
able language cannot be found to characterize it." 



Cannot the United States protect from theft 

Uncle Sam the Goat the luckless immigrants who intrust their 

little money to immigration officials at Ellis 

Island, New York, pending determination of their appeals to enter 

this country. The matter has become a national scandal. 

It was discussed in the United States Senate the other day when 
a bill for the relief of one Kristina Furjak was introduced. She was 
said to have deposited $495 with the Commissioner of Immigration 
at Ellis Island for safekeeping, and the money disappeared. No one 
could tell what happened to it. The only way the owner could get 
relief was by the passage of a bill in Congress authorizing the Sec- 
retary of the Treasury to pay the loser the amount stolen. 

Senator Smoot said that almost every time the calendar was 
called in the Senate or the House, the United States was asked to 
pay money on account of thefts. Senator Walsh of Montana spoke 
of the extraordinary number of those thefts that occurred in the 
immigration service. Senator King of Utah said that thefts occurred, 
too, in the hospitals. 

It developed in the Senatorial discussion that the immigrant 
Kristina Furjak, when she arrived at Ellis Island, was taken by the 



watchmen to the Treasuer's office and there deposited all the money 
she had, $495, receiving a regular certificate for the amount. When 
the woman returned to obtain her deposit the envelope containing 
it could not be located. 

"In other words, somebody stole the money," remarked Senator 
Smoot. "I think there are so very few officials who have access to 
the safe that the department should have found out something more 
about it, rather than hasten down to Washington and ask the Treas- 
ury to pay the amount." 

"It is encouraging the theft of these funds," said Senator Walsh 
of Montana. 

"Certainly," said Senator Smoot. "Not only that, but it has 
gotten now so that when any officer, from the highest to the lowest, 
in the Navy or Army, loses an overcoat or pair of shoes, or any 
part of his apparel, or his wife loses her jewelry, or perhaps her 
hat, or anything else, the Government of the United States has to 
pay for it." 

The business of making Uncle Sam the goat will have to be 
stopped, the Senators agreed. But, of course, it will not. It is too 
easy to spend other people's money when all that is necessary to 
replenish the public treasury is to raise the taxes. 

But how will we reconcile the fact that while we are regulating 
the moral and patriotic readjustment of the world, from beer kegs 
to naval disarmament, we cannot be trusted with the paltry deposits 
of poor immigrants at Ellis Island? 



Now that the Farmers "Bloc" is 
The Burglars Ready to Break In trying to break into the Federal 

Reserve Bank by obtaining long- 
time loans on "frozen credits," it is well to remember that of the 
30,000 banks in the country less than one-third have joined the 
Federal Reserve system. Many banks that joined are getting out. 
The primary reason is the well-founded fear of Congressional med- 
dling. It was the hope of the founders of the Federal Reserve sys- 
tem that every bank in the country would join it. Congress cannot 
compel the outside banks to come in or prevent the member banks 
from going out. 

No bank will join the system, or remain in it, unless permitted 
absolute freedom of contract with its customers, and none will re- 
main if subjected to constant pressure by officials who advise what 
seem unsafe banking practices. That the advice may be given in 
all honesty and with the best motives does not alter the case. As 
United States Senator McLean told his colleagues in the Senate the 
other day: "There is no governmental function where grave errors 
can be more easily made, or less easily remedied, than in attempts 
to provide money for everybody whenever he thinks he needs it. 
The members of the Federal Reserve Board have been subjected to 
constant and severe criticism for a year or more. Being human, 
they have probably made mistakes, but their record as a whole is 
a remarkably good one. The wonder is that with all the obstacles 
that have been put in its path by the great war and the persistent 
attacks of its critics, the Federal Reserve Board has not only saved 
the currency system from its misinformed but very active enemies, 
but has established it upon foundations which only Congress can 
disturb. I hope Congress will now and in the future strengthen these 
foundations and not destroy them. For this reason I ask the Senate 
at this time to refrain from enacting laws which are condemned by 
the Federal Reserve Board and its advisory council, and by every 
impartial student of the subject. In any event, as chairman of the 
Committee on Banking and Currency, I feel it to be my duty to 



February 4, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



urge caution in the consideration of legislation affecting the banking 
and currency system of the country, and place the responsibility 
for hasty and ill-advised and dangerous legislation where it can be 
identified to say the least." 



The New York World may 
Relation of Money Making to Politics not always be right in poli- 
tics. Who is? But it cer- 
tainly has a true understanding of the difference of money making 
and government. Commenting on "the few misguided Pennsylvan- 
ians who have made the mistake of booming Charles M Schwab to 
succeed Boies Penrose in the Senate," the World says: "Mr. Schwab 
is a good business man and an excellent citizen, but he would never 
do as a Senator from Pennsylvania. Senators from Pennsylvania 
have to meet some difficult requirements; they have to be dyed in 
the wool; they have to belong, somehow, as Mr. Schwab never did 
and never could. 

"It is Mr. Schwab's business, anyway, to stay outside and make 
the money. Somebody has to make money or there would be no 
campaign funds, and if there were no campaign funds the organiza- 
tion would naturally go all to thunder, with political leaders out of 
jobs, henchmen starving and no end of destitution. No; it is Mr. 
Schwab's duty to stay where he is and send checks in good time 
to the state committee. 

"Besides, if Mr. Schwab got into the Senate he might try to put 
the Government on an efficient basis and thereby ruin everything. 
The risks are great. Once break the great line of Republican Sen- 
ators from the Keystone State and no one can say what might 
happen. Mr. Schwab isn't in the tradition; he wouldn't under- 
stand." 



The great prosperity of the working classes 
Hail to the Pugilist! caused by war wages was reected in the large 

sums paid to professional boxers. The New 
York World names fifteen pugilists of the second rank who within 
the past eighteen months received sums between $30,000 and $80,- 
000. Most of them were nearer to $50,000 than under that figure. 
Boxing is a manly sport, and within proper lives all right, but when 
the driver of a grocer's delivery wagon can earn $50,000 by boxing 
a few rounds with gloves, the public must be afraid its spare cash 
will burn its pockets. Of course, the sport promoters who paid 
husky delivery boys and young blacksmiths small fortunes to knock 
each other out got the money back in gate receipts. Has anybody 
heard of the gate receipts at a lecture or any useful topic justifying 
the payment of 50,000 cents to the learned lecturer? Most of them 
took chances on not selling enough tickets to pay for the electric 
lights. Yet millions are spent on universities and high schools and 
many fanciful schemes of making the culture of the hoi polloi 
acquire a rich and beautiful polish. The taxpayers expend it. 



The disposition to lynching in the South 
The Anti-Lynching Law has received a setback by the passage of 
the House of Representatives of the anti- 
lynching bill. Though it violates the principles of State sovereignty, 
so dear to the Southern democracy, the representative newspapers 
of the South made no effort to oppose the measure. 

The new bill extends Federal sovereignty over every constable, 
marshal, sheriff, police officer, prosecuting attorney general and 
governor of every state in the Union. It provides for a fine of 
$10,000, which may be charged to a county in which a lynching 
has taken place. It imposes heavy penalties on the citizens of a 
county through which a lynching band has passed. Part of the 
fines imposed are applied to the compensation of the family of the 
person lynched. In this one law all the barriers of democracy have 



been swept away by Federal enactment of the anti-lynching act 
should it be declared constitutional by the Supreme Court. The 
belief in Congress is that it will be upheld by the Supreme Court. 

Having taken that long step towards the abolition of savagery 
in the application of the lynch law, will the nation proceed to make 
all kinds of murder punishable? At present any kind is hardly so. 
The annual murder record of the United States is said to exceed 
15,000. But in the twenty-eight years from 1890 to 1917, inclusive, 
the number of deaths by lynching was approximately equal to the 
number of murderers hanged or electrocuted under sentence of 
regular courts of justice. That is a frightful indictment of our 
civilization. 

There were 3193 persons lynched in the twenty-eight years speci- 
fied. In seventeen states the lynchings exceeded the official execu- 
tions. In some of the states the lynchings were twice, thrice and 
even four times more numerous than the formal punishment of 
murders. The savagery of the lynchings, where victims were chained 
to logs and burned slowly, makes horrible reading in the pages of 
the Congressional Record. It causes one to think that civilization, 
at the best, is but a thin coat of veneer. 

The excuse for those mob burnings of human beings was rape 
of white women by negroes, but it was not a complete or satisfying 
excuse, for sixty-four women, eleven of whom were white and fifty- 
three colored women, had been lynched between January, 1889, 
and 1921. Some women were burned. Time was, perhaps, when 
savage lynchings of negroes was resorted to only for offenses against 
white women, but time has shown that mob law gratified by savage 
vengeance continues to grow more insensate and brutal. In the last 
two years Southern lynchings have increased, and mob law has 
been exemplified in punishment for robberies. Even for petty crimes 
negroes have been lynched. The nation has suffered in the estima- 
tion of the civilized world by such savagery. Unless the courts of 
justice and the regular officers of the law can enforce order we will 
retrograde more rapidly towards anarchy and barbarism than to 
higher levels of Americanism. 



Communism is losing its appeal. 
The Red Brotherhood Scattering The red brotherhood is falling off 

in membership from St. Peters- 
burg to London. In the latter city the "Communist," the official 
organ, has been forced to reduce its size and to stop paying for 
contributions. It announces: 

"This decision has been forced upon the party. Ever since the 
raid and the prosecution of Albert Inkpin the party's funds have 
been steadily drained. The Inkpin case alone has cost more than 
£1000, and the unemployment among our members made it increas- 
ingly difficult to meet these and other calls. Now Mr. Thomas' libel 
action has given the coup de grace." 



— The motor car business has not been a success in Japan, we 
are told by James F. Abbott, United Slates commercial attache in 
that country. He says: "The Japanese have manufactured motor 
cars, and for a time they hoped to become independent of foreign 
manufacturers. It was soon discovered, however, that the cost of 
fabricating a complete car exceeded the cost of importing an Amer- 
ican car." 



— "Henry Ford has submitted a bid to take over the Muscle 
Shoals plant at fairly definite terms," notes the New York World, 
editorially. "The Government has not received any other offer 
worthy of serious attention. If the Ford bid is rejected, is the plant 
to be allowed to go to ruin? If not, the only other course would 
be to operate the plant at Government expense, and for this there 
can be no excuse. Instead of going deeper into business, the Gov- 
ernment should so far as possible withdraw from business." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1922 



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Sin ikkg SI i. i : - !. '< > ( Birea k waters 

By Harvey Broughan 




OUR effort to establish a merchant marine has been one of the 
ghastliest failures in public ownership outside of famine- 
stricken Russia. Every step of the experiment has been marked by 
the wastefulness, lack of vision and graft characteristic of democ- 
racy "making itself safe." When we embarked on the enterprise 
of building a merchant marine the slogan in every shipyard from 
Seattle tc Hog Island was "put men to work; get them at any 
price!" Thus began the scattering of money as if waste of the 
taxpayers' coin and patriotism were synonymous terms. The greater 
the number of hands employed, the larger the profits of the cost- 
plus profiteers. The forcing of war payrolls became an unexampled 
scandal. 

Though four billions of dollars were spent on our hastily con- 
structed merchant marine. Congress has now before it unaudited 
claims that amount to $240,000,000. If many of the claimants got 
what is richly due them, they would spend the remainder of their 
lives in prison. 

The House of Representatives held a post-mortem on the Ship- 
ping Board the other day, and was informed by a corn-belt shipping 
expert from Iowa that there never had been any question of profits 
from our marine fiasco. The only question was how many millions, 
or billions, the luckless taxpayers would lose. Nobody knows that 
even now, years after the war. The official accountants are still in 
a fog. Will it ever be cleared? No chance. 

When we read eulogistic notices about the miracles of manage- 
ment performed by new heads of the Shipping Board, it is well to 
remember that the managers are merely being praised by their pub- 
licity agents, for the reductions they are making in the deficit, and 
not for any start towards profits. 

Having expended billions in building ships, we discovered that 
while we had accumulated 61,000,000 tons, there was business only 
for 35,000,000 tons. Our merchant marine, instead of being a com- 
mercial benefit, was a menace to the world, for it created injudi- 
cious competition and disrupted commercial arrangements. Where 
it cost an American ship of 5000 tons $3000 to make a voyage, a 
British ship of the same tonnage could do it for $1500, and a 
Japanese ship for $950. American navigation laws have made it 
impossible for American ship owners to compete without a subsidy 
in the world carrying trade. For this condition we may largely 
thank the political efforts of the Coast Seamen's Union of San 
Francisco, an organization of 3 per cent Americans, which has 
been strangling American commerce for twenty years, and owes 
much of its deadly influence to Senator La Follette of Wisconsin. 

The loss of the Shipping Board, not long ago, was estimated at 
over $8,000,000 a month — estimated only, for in these socialistic 
adventures of our Government exact bookkeeping is an unknown 
science. Now it is claimed the delcit is within $50,000,000 a year. 
Even that is something for the taxpayers to consider. It is well to 
remember that every cent the Government spends has to be taken 
out of the pockets of the psople. Government itself makes no 
money. It only takes in taxes the money for which the people toil 
and strive, and misuses it. 

What are the ships of our merchant marine, which cost us so 
much money, worth? Heaven only knows? It will never be known. 
Many of them cost $500 a ton, and the Shipping Board would be 
delighted to sell them as a job lot at $25 a ton. We have a thou- 
sand steel vessels tied up with 5000 employes drawing pay. We 
have hundreds of wooden ships that are worthless even as firewood, 
for it costs too much to break them up. The suggestion was made 



in Congress the other day that they might be used in building 
breakwaters by filling them with rocks and sinking them. Twenty 
have been so used. Think of it! Has the world ever seen such an 
insanity of governmental waste? The Empire of Ancient Rome, 
which went to pieces by the robbery of the taxpayers, by socialistic 
and paternal schemes of taxation, bearing heaviest on the indus- 
trious and thrifty, fell far short of our great democracy in its ex- 
travagance. Government of and by the people on such lines re- 
quires heroic readjustment, with protection of the producing classes. 
We should begin by curtailment of municipal suffrage to actual 
taxpayers — not necessarily large taxpayers. But placing the worthy 
citizens and hoboes on the same level to approve the issue of large 
sums in bonded indebtedness for all kinds of fads to give taxeaters 
jobs is national suicide. 



Suicide of Closed-Shop Unionism 

CLOSED-SHOP UNIONISM is disintegrating. By threatening the 
nation with famine through country-wide strikes, it has for- 
feited the public sympathy. The Supreme Court of the United 
States has declared its methods of enforcing its extortions harmful 
and unlawful. The better class of labor is withdrawing from its 
support; within a short time it lost here at least 25 per cent of its 
membership. In other cities, wage-earners and wage-payers are in 
revolt against it. It can't survive in a country where the right to 
earn a living, without paying tribute to a gang of soft-handed 
walking delegates, is still among the constitutional guarantees to 
free men. 

Closed-shop unionism is hanging itself. An evidence of its highly 
satisfying suicidal designs is seen in Tacoma. There it is striking 
against the Washington Parlor Furniture Company. No question of 
wages, hours of work, or conditions of labor is involved; these were 
satisfactory to the walking delegates. Although the company oper- 
ated an ostensibly open shop, no questions were asked the workers 
as to their union, political, religious, or other affiliations; it was, 
however, dominated by the unions. The company employed an 
apprentice, James Everett, an over-seas veteran, who had fought 
gallantly for his country while the soft-handed walking delegates 
were engaged in the essential industry of demanding more pay and 
shorter hours, and in fomenting strikes. The walking delegates told 
the company that if the ex-soldier was to continue in its employ, 
he must join the union. President Slyter said, "Very well; it's up 
to Everett. If he wishes to join the union, there's no objection 
here." 

Then began against ex-Soldier Everett a series of persecutions 
no less cruel although not so dangerous as those practiced against 
the independent workers in some of the shipyards during the war. 
It will be remembered that not a few men who could not be per- 
suaded by argument to join the union were dissuaded by dropping 
hammers and falling beams from continuing on the payroll. A 
member of the union, who afterwards confessed, deliberately marred 
the work of Everett, in order that he might be discharged. The 
union member, discovered in the practice, was dropped. Another 
call was made on President Slyter by the walking delegates, who 
demanded the immediate discharge of Everett; the alternative was 
a walk-out. The strike was called forthwith, the furniture company 
is on the "unfair list"; its products are boycotted; and its plant 
is patrolled by peaceful pickets whose business it is to see that its 
loyal workers suffer as much hurt as possible. — Portland Spectator. 



February 4, 1922 



AND TAXPAYRKS' WEEKLY 



PxiMiji&m i[.'!(-o':| ..; the Hula-Hula 




IT was promised with great positiveness by the advocates of 
drastic prohibition that the enforcement of cold water would 
cool the fever of worldly pleasure in the human blood. The moment 
John Barleycorn was suppressed the eyes of the pleasure-loving 
would turn from the world, the flesh and the devil, and become 
centered on holiness, certain to keep the demands for front seats 
in heaven at the peak. 

But strange to relate, the fantastic pleasures of the night life in 
metropolitan communities seem to have a slronger appeal. Revelries 
lasting from midnight to 5 or 6 o'clock in the morning, including 
exhibitions by dancers in almost no costumes at all, and continuous 
clinking of glasses filled with alcoholic drinks, are characteristic of 
New York's expensive night life in 1922, declares the New York 
Times of January, 1922. 

The Times is at once the greatest newspaper and the most con- 
servative in the United States. Sensationalism is the last and least 
of its characteristics. Scantily-clad professional dancers is becoming 
a topic of curious comment in New York, the Times states. The 
liquor, of course, is an old story. Strong drinks retail at prices that 
"seem ridiculous even at the bootlegging scale." 

"If one has the cash there is no difficulty in finding the places," 
asserts the Times. "Nor is there any doubt that many of them stay 
open, without attempt at concealment, through the early morning 
hours in which dancing resorts should be legally closed. The pass- 
ing citizen, the visitor from out of town, the policeman on the block 
— anybody can see the gay and sometimes reeling patrons go in or 
out, and anybody can enter unless the crowd within is too big to 
permit of further increase. 

"In the exhibition dancing at these resorts the taking off of gar- 
ments and the wriggling details of the dance outdo anything of the 
sort seen in New York." 

The reporter of the Times describes the scene in one of the 
establishments that now caters to the sensual propensities of the 
community because it pays larger profits than in other years: "It 
is 2 a. m. An inconspicuous entrance door is noticeable because 
of limousines and taxis which drive up to the curb, letting out 
women in full-length chinchilla wraps and successful-looking men. 

"The walls of the small entrance lobby are draped with folds of 
vividly striped satin. An imposing lackey stands there. 

"'Have you a reservation)' a somewhat unfashionable couple is 
asked. 'Sorry, but the tables are all engaged for this evening." On 
the other hand, those who have the assured manner of being accus- 
tomed to being admitted find no obstacle in getting past this line 
of defense. Perhaps a regular vice investigator would fail; but not 
if he acquired a confident manner. 

"Upstairs the tables are all taken. A silken rope separates those 
who wait from those already admitted, 'let some of those who wait 
are admitted. Perhaps they are known to the boss. There are gaps 
on the floor and along the settees on the wall where additional 
tables are 'slipped in.' It seems to the newcomer that this service 
is rendered when the couple is strikingly fashionable in appearance, 
or when the man's face seems to be known to the 'captain.' The 
bald method of 'slipping' the captain a bill seems not to be tin- 
open sesame. 

"The orchestra is busy almost continuously. The floor is jammed 
with Fox-trotters, II is noted that the women are all expensively 
gowned. Those who arc not dancing sip what look like cocktails 
or highballs at the tiny circular tables. The waiters are not seen 



to serve liquor, but they aid with accessories a public which carries 
its own hip flask. The place is small and intimate, not spacious. 
The ceilings are hung low with a silken canopy. The walls are 
draped with folds of the satin. The interior decorators for modern 
Babylons do not leave any smooth surface for disturbing wall 
writings! Glowing lights are half hidden within the silk folds. 

"There are young girls in parties of six and eight, who bear all 
the marks of the unchaperoned society flapper. If some of the 
women are veterans of the chorus or the typical old Broadway 
night life, they don't show it. Most of them are young and good 
looking, although there are a few elderly and heavily jeweled dan- 
cers. The orchestra represents the best in modern jazz. 

"At 3 o'clock green light begins to play over the room. It is the 
signal that the exhibition dancers are ready to regale the prosperous 
patrons of vulgar dancing with the Hawaiian hula-hula. 

The premiere danseuse is an American who made her fame in 
vaudeville reviews in the beginning of the 'shimmy' craze, because 
of her remarkable control over the muscles. Her acrobatics are 
undoubtedly extraordinary. 

"The chief dancer steps around the edge of the floor, within two 
feet of the men seated en the 'ringside seats.' She directs her atten- 
tion first to one man and then to another, as cabaret dancers and 
singers do. Finally the exhibition ends. With graceful, creeping 
steps the dancers wind their way through the tables to their exit. 
The orchestra begins again an exotic winning melody. The floor is 
soon filled with the closely dancing couples. The onlooker can now 
observe that the wriggly exhibition dancing has exerted an influence 
upon the place's clientele. There is an increase in the number of 
couples whose bodies quiver rhythmically to the music. Many of 
them seem to be imitative. 

"This resort stays open until 6 a. m., and is more or less crowded 
until that hour. It is noticeable that the later arrivals are even more 
fashionable in their appearance. One is told that they are arriving 
after the close of some formal society function. 

"The Rev. Dr. John Roach Straton, one of the preachers most 
frequently active in attacking the night life of New York and the 
trend of modern recreation in general, is quoted as declaring that 
'Broadway has been poisoned until it grows ominous to America. 
It grows worse because it has been captured by greed and commer- 
cialism. The fellows who have captured the amusement market are 
appealing to the sensual because that is the quickest road to box 
office receipts'." 



EUROPE'S FAMOUS W ( i X D B R GLASS 
\ MARVELOUS NEM INVENTION 

The "Binoculette" 



ii Actual 




H Actual 

Si/,- 



v COMBINED (ill It \ una FIELD (.1 .ASS. Cm he carried la « 
mull's vr-t |>i,i k.-t ir l:nl> * iiursr, »n«l ueiKli* (inly J ' ^ IIJHMi 
I srfnl [ndoan or Out. IJ.'Ciilur I'rir* SI 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Optical Expert and Importers of Optical apecialUea 

«-«0 \turk.-i Street, l.rtnrrn Mntnn n ml Tsvlnr Strr.-«« 

I'UOMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1922 




mm 

'Cbetbalwil/jfy (jxdnilsir,vXb]Kn 

— The lamentable accident by which the mother of two children 
and prospective mother of a third, was killed, and in which the wife 
of one of our Police Commissioners figured, should teach courts 
and police the wisdom of calmness and prudence in dealing with 
automobile mishaps. Both courts and police have a tendency to 
overdo or neglect their duties. There seems to be no half-way 
course of sensible but effective moderation. It is either a cry of 
"Away with him, crucify him," or nothing is said or done and the 
offender walks off. 



— In the deplorable motor accident by which a young mother 
has lost her life, and a family has been bereaved, the woman who 
drove the machine appears to have been blameless. She is reputed 
to be a lady of fine intelligence and benevolent character. Doubt- 
less none more than she could have more sincerely deplored the 
awful accident. That is perhaps true of many people whose auto- 
mobiles kill or injure fellow-beings. Fatal accidents occur like the 
falling of a thunderbolt from a clear sky. One moment all is well, 
and the road apparently clear. The next instant a life has been 
ended or a person maimed for life. Whatever the extent of the 
accident, the facts of it deserve to be carefully and fairly investi- 
gated, and the courts and the press not made agencies in working 
up hysterical sensation to advance circulation of yellow newspapers 
or prospective votes for political judges. 



— Just now the punishment of speeders is in high favor, though 
not long ago any motorist with a political pull could traverse the 
city streets at racing speed. If he ran over anyone, the trouble to 
take the culprit's name was almost too much for the officers of the 
law. If brought before a court, the offender was generally turned 
loose with a few formal words of advice not to do it again. But if 
he did it again, and still again, and had a strong political pull, he 
never got behind the bars of a prison. 



— Now all is supposed to be changed. Speeding has ostensibly 
become a felony, meriting no favor towards the offender. If some 
citizen not politically influential is unlucky enough to collide with 
a pedestrian, heaven help him. Before the courts have heard the 
case, the yellow newspapers have indicted the prisoner and found 
him guilty on all counts. It is intimated that he not only ran down 
the victim, but left him unaided on the street. Every rumor calcu- 
lated to blacken the defendant's reputation is amplified, and the 
public made to believe that the rascal would get no more than his 
deserts if lynched at the most convenient lamp-post. But as before 
said, if the defendant can exercise a strong political pull, the police 
are as courteous and diplomatic as foreign statesmen at a confer- 
ence and the newspapers are silent as clams. 



— Obviously we shall have no improvement of traffic regulations 
under a system which plays fast and loose as the case may be. We 
must have judges who will be such in fact as well as in name. And 
we cannot get them under our present system of electing them, and 
making the police bench and the superior bench mere prizes for 
the swiftest politicians. We must have our judges appointed, as are 
the Federal judges, and retained in office, not forced to fight for 
their places at every election. 



— Unless we encourage respect for the law by the establishment 
of proper courts under appointed judges, all the evils of motor 
traffic and every other activity will not only be continued, but 
become worse. 

— But meantime, while we are attempting to accomplish the 
necessary judicial changes, our police and our existing courts 
should try and remember that no man is entitled to be considered 
guilty until he has had a full hearing in court, and there are two 
sides to every case. By observing that maxim and placing all peo- 
ple on something like equality before the law, we shall have made 
some advance towards the better courts, that are possible only 
under the appointive system. 



INCOMPREHENSIBLE RECKLESSNESS 

The Public Service Commission of Nevada has issued an order 
requiring the drivers of auto stages and trucks engaged in the 
transportation of passengers, explosives and inflammable liquids, to 
stop before crossing the tracks of any steam or electric interurban 
railroad and look in each direction for approaching trains. 

The order, which does not apply to the crossing of tracks of 
electric and other street railroads within municipalities, is similar to 
the one recently issued by the California Commission, but is broader 
in scope as it includes trucks transporting explosives and inflam- 
mable liquids. 

The degree of carelessness and recklessness on the part of auto- 
mobile drivers is almost incomprehensible. During the last three 
years and nine months ending September 30, grade crossing acci- 
dents on the Southern Pacific involved the death of 1 77, injury to 
828 and the damage or destruction of 2495 automobiles. The 
number of instances is surprising in which automobiles ran on 
tracks in front of trains, usually the result of racing with the train; 
ran into side of train instead of train into them, mainly the result 
of trying to beat train to the crossing; ran through and broke 
down crossing gates lowered to protect them from approaching 
train, and ran down and injured crossing flagmen warning them 
of an approaching train. 



AN ORGANIZED BUT OUTLAW TRUST 

The greatest monopoly in the country is closed-shop unionism. It 
is not only the greatest, but the most dangerous. It is so thoroughly 
organized, that it can and does defy the law; as it is not incor- 
porated, the law cannot touch it as an organization; from whatever 
statutes are applicable in the regulation of similar trusts and monop- 
olies labor unionism has the exemptions claimed by any other ou'- 
law. Labor unionism does not incorporate, because it fears the law; 
it is the pariah among the country's trusts. 

Unionism asserts its monopoly of labor, and seeks to enforce it 
through the closed shop. In the closed shop it refuses to permit 
any but union members to work; it tries to discourage the open 
shop, by destroying the business of those who adopt that American 
plan of employment. Of course, this pariah trust has no right to 
say who shall or shall no! be permitted to earn a living, nor has it 
any but an impudently usurped right to say who shall or shall not 
do business. The power it employs to enforce its unrighteous de- 
crees its exercised through organization. Those who suffer from its 
exactions — the laborer who is deprived of his right to earn a living 
for himself and family, the employer who must yield the conduct 
of his business to the walking delegate, and the public that has to 
pay the cost of high wages for restricted production — are not or- 
ganized. The outlaw trust, attacking each separately, has been able 
to impose its demands on all. How long must we endure the ex- 
tortions of this pariah monopoly? Just so long as we are unorgan- 
ized — after that, not a moment. There are 36,000,000 of us, and 
less than four million members of the outlaw monopoly. — Porjand 
Spectator. 



February 4, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



The Pressing Railroad Problem 



THE attempt to provide a unified railroad system for San Fran- 
cisco by the purchase of the Market Street properties is re- 
ceiving special attention from taxpayers, because they realize that 
our city cannot progress as it should under the present rival railroad 
systems; and San Francisco is on the eve of a great movement in 
building and advance in realty values. 

San Francisco has never had a real estate boom, in the full sense 
of the term, as Los Angeles has had. We do not desire it. But we 
do desire a healthy, normal growth, and our city has not had favor- 
able conditions for improvment in many years. In fact, since the 
great fire in 1906 the San Francisco real estate market has not 
attracted the attention it deserves. 

Things have changed much in the past year. Organized labor has 
become more reasonable and building is being stimulated. In fifteen 
years there has been no such favorable movement. 

Nothing but inefficeint railroad service can delay the growth of 
our city any longer. Our railroads are far from being bad, but with 
privately owned lines in competition with a municipal system it is' 
essential for future development that there should be harmony of 
purpose. We are committed to public ownership. Private lines are 
therefore under a disadvantage, which must operate against the city 
in the extensions of service essential to a growing community. Pri- 
vate lines cannot plan for extensions, and municipal lines paralleling 
existing private roads, and engaging in unprofitable competition, 
would be injurious to the taxpayers. 

The purchase of the Market Street properties by the city, paying 
for the lines out of the profits, would seem the right solution of the 
problem. The sooner the problem is solved, the belter for the tax- 
payers. 



OREGON SHIPPING MEN DISAPPOINTED 

According to the Spectator of Portland, Ore.', the Portlanders 
were not pleased with the way the recent "thiriy-million-dollar com- 
bine" of shipping men managed in San Francisco to handle gov- 
ernment-owned ships. "San Diego, with a negligible commerce, had 
as much voting s'.rength in the meeting as the State of Oregon with 
its enormous volume of foreign commerce," complains the Spectator. 
It adds: 

"Many other aspects of the conference were unique. Within ten 
minutes after it had been called to order, a resolution was presented 
committing the meeting to approval of the principle of a pool or 
combine for the Pacific, and naming committees to work out the 
plans. When Portland asked for a brief period to consider such 
far-reaching questions, there was impatience, and the program 
seemed to be to approve what came, and adjourn. 

"Surely the shipping of the Pacific under the American flag can- 
not be put upon a satisfactory operating basis in this manner. 
Surely the problem will have to enlist the sympathetic treatment 
of those who show their good faith by using and fighting for Amer- 
ican flag vessels, instead of sailing their ships under alien and com- 
petitive flags. Surely the time has not arrived when there is no 
hope for the American flag on the Pacific, except under the aegis 
of a combine or monoply, which principle of building up Pacific 
commerce was discarded by the British a hundred years ago to meet 
the keen competitive drive of the independent Yankees. Surely time 
will be given by some one, somewhere, in working out a sound 
stable plan, and surely when that opportunity comes the men and 
companies who show they know how to operate ships profitably, 
and do not give their entire energies to digging into the public 
treasury, will have at least fair consideration. 

"If the San Francisco conference is to be the usual type or plan 
of meeting for studying American ship operations on these waters, 
our flag is lost again from the Pacific." 




American 
Canyon 
Route 

via Ogden 

DIRECT totheEAST 

Three Daily Trains 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO FERRY STATION 

Overland Limited 

Connects with all Limited Leave 11:00 a.m. 

Trains Chicago to New York Ar. Chicago 9:00 a.m. 
and Eastern Cities. <sd D "»'> 

Pacific Limited 

Connects at Chicago with all Leave 6:00 p.m. 

evening Limited Trains for Ar. Chicago 4:00 p.m. 

the East. (3d Da,) 

St. Louis Express 

_ . „ „. Leave " 1:00 p.m. 

Connect.ng at Kansas City Ar Dcnver 12: 15p. m . 

and St. Louis with trains East Ar. Kansas 

City 9:15 a.m. 

and South. Ar. St. Louis 6:15 p.m. 

<3d Day) 



Phone Sutter 4000 

Or Ask Any Agent 

FOR RAILROAD AND PULLMAN FARES 
50 POST ST.— FERRY STATION— THIRD ST. STATION 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1922 



IS 




lISIlBIIHIIliBSiBig^gHSS^ 



KTsj^i^: Ki;a :Zi 



EUROPEAN newspapers and periodicals have been devoting 
much attention to the tercentenary of Moliere, who was born in 
the Rue Saint-Honore, Paris, on January 15, 1622, and died as he 
had lived most of his life, in the theater. His family name was 
Poquelin, and he was christened Jean Baptiste. His father was 
upholsterer to Henry IV, and it was the ambition of Poquelin Sr. 
that his on would succeed him in the position. But young Poquelin 
was born with the instinc's of author and actor, and remained to 
the last a bright light of the French stage. His maternal grand- 
father took the boy so often to the theater that Pere Poquelin 
remonstrated with much indignation: "Do you wish," said he, "to 
make the boy a comedian?" "May it please heaven," the grand- 
father answered, "that he become as good a comedian as Belle- 
rose!" Bellerose was then a star of French modey, and Moliere 
never forgot this speech. His grandfather continued to take him to 
the Hotel de Bourgogne, the theater in question, and it was here 
that Moliere's genius was watered and trained. H. C. Chatfield- 
Taylor, in his admirable study, "Moliere," describes this house, 
which Mr. Rostand has brought to modern eyes in the first act of 
"Cyrano de Bergerac" : 

"In the parterre, or pit, then entirely devoid of seats, a various 
rabble gathered — lackeys, soldiers, artisans, shopkeepers and im- 
pecunious gentlemen — and to keep the quarrelsome from interfering 
with the actors the spectators were separated from the stage by a 
barrier at the height of a man's shoulder. Orange girls cried re- 
freshments in the parterre, ladies of the Court graced the boxes, 
men of fashion sat upon the stage; crudely painted back drops 
sufficed for the scenery, clusters of candles suspended from the roof 
by a cord and pulley gave the stage its light; in a box fiddlers sat 
bowing wheezy violins, and the "dead-heads" of the day — the 
King's musketeers — were so quick to draw their rapiers that riots 
were of frequent occurrence and duels not unknown; such in brief 
was the Hotel de Bourgogne." 

Moliere knew all the vicissitudes of a strolling actor's life before 
he came into his own. After wandering for fifteen years without 
reaping fame or fortune, Moliere arrived in Paris in October, 1658, 
and two years later he and his company were commanded to appear 
before the young King, Louis XIX, at the Louvre, and play "The 
Blunderer" and "Les Precieuses Ridicules." Thus began the famous 
stage of the great actor's career. His path was not all roses. Ac- 
cording to the Court custom of the day, the great dramatist was 
appointed a "Valet de Chambre," and the young sprigs of aris- 
tocracy regarded him as a low fellow and an interloper. Louis, 
hearing of this, said to the actor one morning; "I hear that you 
are badly entertained, M. de Moliere, and that my people don't find 
you good enough to eat with them. Perhaps you are hungry. Sit 
down and try my en cas de nuit." This was a stand-by meal pro- 
vided to satisfy a possible royal appetite in the night hours. Each 
took a wing of cold chicken. Louis called in his courtiers and said: 
"You see, I am making Moliere eat something, for my valets de 
chambre don't find him good enough company for them." 

Moliere's troupe was first installed by order of Louis XIX at the 
Theatre du Petit-Bourbon, and then in 1660 at the Theatre du 
Palais Royal, which had been built by the Cardinal Richelieu. 

The great playwright remained on the boards to the last. There 
are few more touching or dramatic stories than that of his collapse 
while, in "Le Malade Imaginaire," he was pretending to die. It was 
pretense to the audience and reality to the man. He was known to 



be ill and was anxiously watched. He had said to his expostulating 
friends: "How can I refuse to go on, when the bread of so many 
poor actors depends upon the performance? I cannot let them 
suffer." His own suffering was short. When the curtain fell he was 
carried to his home. "My course is run," he said, and he died. 
Today the civilized world joins with France in honoring the memory 
of this great master of the art and quality of human life. 

He died on February 17, 1673, only 51 years of age, having 
produced thirty comedies, the greater part being masterpieces. 



British Empire No Longer 



? f X TNTIL within the last few years when we said 'British Empire' 
\^J we said it with reverence and pride. Now we scarcely dare 
to use those two words," says Sir Sidney Low in the Sunday Pic- 
torial. "We may talk of the Community of Nations or of the British 
Commonwealth. But the Empire we prefer not to mention, being 
apparently rather ashamed both of the thing and of the name. 

"You cannot be proud of an institution or system which has to 
be hidden away under this kind of verbal apology. We should not 
think much of Parliament if we called it 'the Collection of Politi- 
cians known as the House of Commons.' 

"The British Empire has ceased to be an Empire. Its formal 
extinction was registered at the Paris Peace Conference, when Mr. 
Lloyd George insisted that the Dominions and India should be sepa- 
rately represented in the assembly of the League of Nations. 

"Until then the Overseas States were still a unit with Great 
Britain as against other countries. Now they have control not only 
of their domestic affairs, but of their foreign relations as well. They 
are, in fact, independent States linked to Britain only by the com- 
mon allegiance to the person of the King. 

"This is the position of Canada, Australasia, South Africa and 
Ireland. One cannot doubt that it will presently be claimed, and 
acquired, by India. What we have, therefore, is now an Alliance; 
an association of independent States which agree to act together 
for certain purposes, and to support one another if attacked. 

"The Dominions have no technical right to secede; but it has 
been tacitly admitted in the course of the Irish discussions that they 
can do so if they please. 

"Such is, then, the modern phase of British Imperialism, a thing 
unique in history. For the British Empire is substituted the Britannic 
League of Nations. 

"Some are English in speech, traditions and origin; some are 
alien in race, language and religion. And between them they include 
more than a quarter of the inhabitants of the earth. 

"It is an immense experiment. The transition has been swift, 
wonderful, almost silent, and its character is as yet imperfectly 
recognized. 

"The change from Empire to Alliance has come, as it were, like 
a thief in the night. Ireland is one stage towards its completion; 
India may be the next. 

"And then ? 

"What will come of this amazing transformation? Will it endure? 
Or is it only the beginning of another movement which will end in 
destroying all unity among the members of the World-Realm, and 
dissolving it into its component elements?" 



February 4. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



II 



Start of the Elks 



A WRITER in the New York Times tells how the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, with a membership of over 800,000, 
grew out of the social order of the "Jolly Corks," started by several 
vaudeville performers in New York over fifty years ago. The first 
chairman of the Jolly Corks was Charles Vivian, a music hall singer, 
who forty years ago was a San Francisco favorite. He played at 
the lime when Billy Emerson was the leader in negro minstrels, and 
most of San Francisco's show houses were on Bush street. 

Vivian landed in New York City in 1867, and made his first ap- 
pearance at the old American Theater on Broadway. In February, 
1868, it was proposed that the "Jolly Corks" be organized as a 
benevolent and protective order. The charter membership of seven 
included Vivian, who before leaving England had been a member 
of the "Royal and Antediluvian Order of Buffalos." The charter 
members decided by one vote that an elk should be the emblem 
of the order. Some members wanted a moose. Vivian, as prime 
mover in the formation of the Elks and "Imperial" Cork of the 
original order, expected to be elected head of the new Elks. Some 
misunderstanding occurred, and while he was in Philadelphia filling 
an engagement the Elks held their first meeting, on May 25, 1868, 
with George W. Thompson as first presiding officer. Three weeks 
later at a meeting held on June 14, 1868, Vivian made formal 
application for membership in the lodge, but was rejected. It ap- 
pears that he never had been formally received into the order of 
Elks. 

Vivian died in Leadville, Colo., March 20, 1880, of pneumonia, 
after a short life of theatrical vicissitudes, ranging from touring 
with his own companies to being stranded in Denver, penniless. The 
only identification on his grace for several years was a pine board 
at the head with the singer's name scratched on it. His popularity 
produced a sort of fraternal sentiment that has caused many to 
regard him as the founder of the order in spite of apparently re- 
liable historical records showing that he never became an Elk. On 
April 28, 1889, certain members of the order caused Vivian's re- 
mains to be exhumed in Leadville and placed them in Elks' Rest, 
Mount Hope Cemetery, Boston. There, on a massive, irregular 
boulder on whose face there is a large bronze plate, in raised let- 
ters, stands out this inscription: 

"Charles Algernon Sidney Vivian, Founder of the Order of Elks. 
Died March 20, 1880, aged 34 years. A lover of his kind who 
founded a great Order, and in doing so wrought much good." 

In the lodge rooms on Forty-third street. New York, the Elks 
have carefully preserved the first charter and the original old banner 
of No. I. 

Not many theatergoers of the early days when Vivian sang to 
San Francisco audiences are left, but some remember him as a 
handsome chap with a fine voice and a pleasing personality. Few 
of the early-day performers were prosperous in their last years. 
Billy Emerson, the head of the minstrel profession, died in New 
York, broken down and forgotten, except by one woman, who gave 
his remains decent burial. 



INDIA IMPORTANT INDUSTRIALLY 

The Bombay Labor Gazette declares that India has 28.000.000 
agricultural workers. 20,000,000 industrial workers and 141.000 
men engaged in following the sea. The value of India's annual 
exports of manufactured goods is put at $190,000,000; 20,000.000 
tons of shipping clear and enter her ports annually: she produces 
21,000,00 tons of coal and 500.000 Ions of iron ore. and she has 
58.474 kilometers of railways. 



It is easy to drink one's-self to death now on bootleg whisky. 
It used to take some years. The world moves. 



■!• * ♦ ♦ * •> * ♦ * ♦ •:• •:• * * * * *> * * •:• * * <5> # •:■ •:■ .;. .;. .;. .> .J. * * ,> .;. .;, ,j, * .;. .;, .;. ,;, f 



Established 1865 

Larkins 

Automobile 

Painting 



Buying a Larkins Paint Job is 

like buying good tires— you get 
more miles to the dollar. 

The durability of the Larkins 
Paint Job makes unnecessary 
the laying up of the car for paint- 
ing soon again. 

Both time and money are saved. 



Larkins & Co. 

First Avenue and Geary Street 
San Francisco 

Makers of the Larkins Top 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1922 




ocdat 




Busy Cupid 

THE marriage of Miss Virginia Randolph 
Harrison to Mr. Christian Gross took 
place Tuesday in Algiers, and the bride's 
great aunt, Mrs. Charles B. Alexander, and 
Mr. Alexander went from New York for the 
wedding. The engagement of the couple was 
announced a few weeks ago in Spain, where 
the Harrison family had gone from England. 

The bride is the daughter of former Gov- 
ernor Francis Burton Harrison and his first 
wife, who was Miss Mary Crocker of this 
city, a sister of Mr. Charles Templeton 
Crocker and Mrs. Malcolm Whitman. She 
was killed in an automobile accident in the 
East a number of years ago and her daugh- 
ters, the bride and Miss Barbara Harrison, 
have been frequent visitors at the home of 
their uncle, Mr. Templeton Crocker, in Bur- 
lingame. 

On her father's side, the bride comes 
from an old Southern family and is a 
granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
■Burton Harrison, the latter of whom be- 
longed to the Randolph family of Virginia. 

It was during a visit of her father in 
Manila, when he was Governor-General of 
the Philippines, that Miss Harrison met Mr. 
Gross, who was then a captain in the army. 

Mr. Gross is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles W. Gross of Chicago. 

— Mrs. Edwin L. Griffith and her sister, 
Miss Pauline Coppee, of Ross Valley, will 
leave in the early spring for London to be 
present at the wedding of their nephew, Mr. 
Wharton Thurston, and Miss Evelyn Poett, 
which will take place in May. The bride's 
cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stetson, are 
other Californians who will be at the wed- 
ding. The engagement of Miss Poett and 
Mr. Thurston was announced two months 
ago. The bride-elect made a number of 
friends here and down the peninsula when 
she visited the Stetsons last winter at Bur- 
lingame. She is the daughter of General 
and Mrs. Joseph Poett of England and is 
related to the Harry Poetts of San Mateo. 

— Miss Elizabeth Stetson Rosekrans, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Newton Rose- 
krans, announced her engagement to Duane 
Seymore Tweeddale at a tea which she gave 
on Saturday afternoon. The affair was given 
at the Clay street home of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Walter Stetson, grandparents of the 
hostess. 

—Miss Olive Mills, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Uel Mills, will be married on 
Tuesday evening, February 21, to Mr. Ray 
Edwin Chatfield. The ceremony will take 
place at 8:30 o'clock at Christ Episcopal 
Church, Alameda. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle are 
spending their honeymoon at Samarkand in 
Santa Barbara. They have one of the pic- 



turesque cottages at the famous hotel which 
open on the gorgeous Persian garden. On 
their return Mr. and Mrs. Monteagle will 
make their home in San Mateo, where Mrs. 
Monteagle's two children are established. 

—Miss Amanda McNear and Mr. William 
Hendrickson Jr. will be married the latter 
part of April in Ross Valley. The ceremony 
will be performed at the Episcopal Church, 
and later there will be a reception at the 
McNear home in Ross. 

Luncheons 

— Miss Barbara Sesnon gave a luncheon 
Tuesday for Miss Ruth Lent, the bride-elect 
of Mr. Hermon Underhill of New York. 

—Mrs. William Cluff gave a luncheon at 
the Palace Tuesday for Mrs. George Rolph, 
who recently returned from a trip around 
the world. 

— Miss Marion Zeile gave a luncheon on 
Monday at the Fairmont for Miss Cornelia 
Armsby, who recently arrived from the East 
and Europe to visit her brothers, Mr. Gor- 
don and Mr. Raymond Armsby at Bur- 
lingame. 

— Miss Jane Flood gave a large farewell 
luncheon for her niece. Miss Flood, Tuesday 
at the Fairmont. 

— Mrs. Robert I. Bentley will be hostess 
at a luncheon on Monday, February 6, at 
the Palace Hotel, complimentary to Miss 
Ruth Lent. 

— Miss Mary Julia Crocker gave a lunch- 
eon Thursday as a farewell to Miss Flood. 

— Miss Marion Zeile is giving a series of 
luncheons prior to her departure for the 
East within a fortnight or so. She will ac- 
company Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker. 
Miss Zeile will visit her cousin, Mrs. J. 
Cheever Cowdin, in New York. 
Teas 

— The revival of the afternoon tea dance, 
recalling the days when the tango started all 
the ages to dancing at all hours of the day 
and night, is meeting with popular vogue. 
The Hotel St. Francis started the fad and 
at Monday's dansant many small parties and 
a few large ones filled the garden room, 
where the army and navy men, who are 
invariably splendid dancers, were to be seen 
at many a table. Mrs. William Hart Wood 
had a large party. Mrs. Eleanor Martin was 
there with a coterie of young friends. 

— Mrs. S. Yada, the wife of the Japanese 
consul-general, gave a tea on Thursday aft- 
ernoon to Mme. Tamaki Miura, the Japa- 
nese prima donna. It took place at the St. 
Francis Hotel in the Italian room. 

—Mrs. Ashley Mulgrave Gould of Wash- 
ington, D. C, was the guest of honor at a 
tea given Wednesday by Mrs. I. Lowenberg 
in the Palm Court, Palace Hotel. The hostess 
was assisted in receiving by Mrs. Abraham 
Lincoln Brown and Mrs. Geo. H. Cabaniss. 



— Miss Elsie Bishop was the guest of 
honor at a handsomely appointed shower 
and tea given by Mrs. C. Waldo Gordon 
and Mrs. Etienne de Saymanski in the Em- 
pire room at The Fairmont on Wednesday. 
Miss Bishop recently announced her engage- 
ment to Mr. George Stienel, manager of the 
Crocker interests in this city. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George Wingfield enter- 
tained informally at dinner on Friday even- 
ing at The Fairmont, the members of the 
party later attending the Junior League 
Cabaret. 

— Mrs. Frank Hooper gave a bridge party 
and tea Tuesday noon for Miss Ola Willett, 
a bride-elect. 

Dinners 

— Miss Margaret Buckbee gave a dinner 
on Friday at her home in Pacific avenue for 
Miss Ruth Lent and her fiance. The guests 
afterwards attended the ball which Mr. and 
Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling gave at the Hotel 
St. Francis for Miss Eleanor Spreckels. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George de Latour enter- 
tained at an informal dinner Tuesday even- 
ing at their home in Pacific avenue. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Allen entertained 
at dinner on Friday evening, and Miss 
Spreckels, their niece, was the guest of 
honor. Among others who entertained at 
dinner parties before the Jackling ball were 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Heimann, Mr. and 
Mrs. Alexander Rutherford, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stewart Lowery, Mr. and Mrs. Edson F. 
Adams and their daughters, Miss Elizabeth 
and Miss Ellita Adams, Mr. and Mrs. 
Georges de Latour, Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Slade, Miss Margaret Buckbee, Miss Lawton 
Filer and several others. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Henry Kiersted will enter- 
tain at a dinner-dance at the Fairmont Ho- 
tel on February 25 in honor of Miss Frances 
Pringle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
J. Pringle. Miss Pringle is one of the sea- 
son's debutantes. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Spreckels were 
dinner hosts Wednesday evening at their 
home in Washington street, where they en- 
tertained a dozen guests. Among those bid- 
den to the affair were General and Mrs. 
Hunter Liggett, Mr. and Mrs. Charlemange 
Tower, Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo Avenali, M. 




The Greatest Value E^ver 

Offered the Motor 

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OP SAN FRANCISCO 



February 4. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



and Mme. Andre Ferrier and Mrs. Herbert 
Newhall. 

Ball 

— The ball which Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
Cowan Jackling gave at the Hotel St. Fran- 
cis Friday was the brilliant climax to one of 
the gayest of winter seasons. Miss Eleanor 
Spreckels. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ru- 
dolph Spreckels, niece of the Jacklings, was 
the honored guest. The Colonial and Italian 
ballrooms were transformed into a veritable 
bower of flowers for the occasion. 
In Town and Out 

— Mrs. Thomas Driscoll has returned to 
her home in Burlingame from Santa Bar- 
bara, where she visited her mother, Mrs. 
Albert Bacon. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Roth will spend 
the summer down the peninsula and have 
rented the beautiful Folger place at Wood- 
side. Mrs. James Athearn Folger will spend 
the summer abroad. 

— Mrs. Marion Lord left on Tuesday for 
New York and a number of her friends were 
at the ferry to say good-bye. Mrs. Lord will 
visit her son, Mr. Andre Lord, in New York 
for a short time, and will then sail for 
Europe. 

— Miss Barbara Kimble returned Tuesday 
from Honolulu, where she has been enjoy- 
ing a month's sojourn. She has joined her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Kimble, at 
their home here. 

— Mrs. Elena Robinson Goodwin has 
gone to La Patera Rancho in Santa Bar- 
bara, where she is visiting her cousin, Mrs. 
Edgar W. Stow. 

— Mrs. Andrew Warner Lawson, who 
went to Washington state last month to join 
her husband, has decided to remain the 
North until the end of February. At present 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawson are in Spokane. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Williamson have 
returned to their home in San Mateo after 
enjoying a few days' visit here. They passed 
the week-end at the Fairmont Hotel. An- 
other couple from San Mateo that enjoyed 
the week-end at this hostlery was Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Park. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Allan Lowrey and their 
little daughter have arrived from New York 



STYLE CHANGES 

in ophthalmic Lenses are not frequent, but 
unlike other necessities when they do 
change II la because a marked Improve- 
ment has been ras 

lenses are b de i ement 01 er 

other types of lenses In addition to being 
"the style." Side reflections, superfluous 
u eight .i nd conspicuous m ii rtated. 

\\, I>. Keiinlimire A. H. Kennlmore 

J. W. Davtfl 




Snn I'r i.<« - LSI Poet. tSOB MUslon Sta. 

Berkeley - - - - (lot slmtliuk Areaae 
Oakland 1*31 Braatfam] 



and have joined Mis. Lowrey's father, Mr. 
C. N. Black, who is occupying the Magee 
house in Pacific avenue this winter. The 
Lowreys will make their home here. Mrs. 
Lowrey was Miss Marie Louise Black. 

— Mrs. Whitelaw Reid arrived from her 
home in New York Tuesday and will be at 
her place in Millbrae for the month of Feb- 
ruary. 

Intimations 
— Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker are 
among the many Californians who will be 
in Europe during the late spring and sum- 
mer. They are planning to be away several 
months. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Shatter Howard, who 
went East last year, have gone to Europe 
and are now enjoying the gay season at St. 
Moritz, in Switzerland. They went there 
from Paris, where they had been for several 
weeks. 

—Admiral Albert Niblack, U. S. N., naval 
attache at the Court of St. James, and Mrs. 
Niblack are taking a trip on the Continent. 
They recently visited Constantinople. They 
were entertained there by Commander and 
Mrs. Hamilton Bryan. Commander Bryan is 
aide to Admiral Bristol, who is high com- 
missioner in Turkish waters. 

— Miss Mary Eyre is planning a trip to 
Europe and will leave in a few weeks. She 
will go first to France, and it will be her 
first visit since she was there during the 
war as a relief worker. 

— Mr. and Mrs. James Flood, Miss Mary 
Flood and Miss Mary Donohoe will leave 
on Saturday for New York and Egypt and 
will be away three or four months. 

—Mrs. William A. Glassford, wife of 
Commander Glassford, U. S. N., will sail on 
the navy transport Argonne on February 7 
for the Philippines. She will be joined there 
by Commander Glassford, who will sail on 
the U. S. S. Montgomery on February 25, 
to take charge of a flotilla of destroyers in 
Asiatic waters. 

Mrs. Elysee Schultz Hopkins and her 
son, Samuel Hopkins Jr., are en route home 
from Paris, where they have been for most 
of the past year. They arrived in New lork 
a few days ago and on account of illness 
are remaining there. Mrs. Hopkins expects 
to go to Atlantic City later to regain her 
health. 

— The Samuel F. B. Morses opened their 
cottage and had guests over the fortnight of 
the tournament at Del Monte. 
At Del Monte 
Miss Helen Crocker and her brother, 
W. W. Crocker, m.ide elaborate preparations 
for a house warming last Saturday in their 
beautiful place in the hills of Pebble Beach, 
overlooking Carmel Bay. The house, which 
was recently built, is located on a knoll 
with a commanding view of the forest and 
the waters of Carmel Bay. 

— Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Cook and daughter 
of San Rafael have been sojourning at Del 
Monte Lodge for the past month. Mr. Cook 
is planning to sail his yacht to Still Water 
Cove in May, to enjoy the pleasures of fish- 
ing in Carmel Bay and Monterey Bay. 



— Society in numbers are turning out at 
the Del Monte fields to witness the opening 
tournament of the polo season. Polo has 
always been a great attraction for the spec- 
tators on the side lines, and enthusiasm this 
year seems to be greater than ever before. 

— A side feature of the polo tournament 
will be a race matinee at the Del Monte 
track on Saturday, February 4. The paper 
chase at Pebble Beach on February 25 is 
also attracting much attention. 

— Miss Lucile Byington of San Francisco 
is visiting her cousin, Byington Ford, and 
Mrs. Ford at their place in Pebble Beach. 



Piano Recital at Fairmont Hotel 

The piano recital of Miss Leona Spitzer, 
an artist pupil of the well-known concert 
pianist and instructor, George Kruger, given 
in the Gold room at the Fairmont Hotel, 
was a decided artistic success and attended 
by a large, fashionable audience, which en- 
tirely filled the hall. 

Miss Irene Fremont aided the concert 
with some beautiful songs by Saint-Saens, 
Chadwick and Woodman, which she sang 
with fine interpretation. 



SUNDAY DINNER AT FAIRMONT HOTEL 

Sunday dinner in the Venetian room of 
the Fairmont Hotel, from 6:30 to 8 o'clock, 
fcr $1.75, is something calculated to excite 
interest these days when good dinners are 
not easy to get at any price. An enlarged 
orchestra, under direction of Rudy Seiger, 
will be a feature of the Sunday dinner at 
the Fairmont. The service is always perfect. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 

t from at Marsh's, who is now per- 

manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



ELECTROLYSIS 

i d and moles, warts and 

removed by 

my latest Improved multiple needle ma- 
U't>iU miaianteed. 

M ADAM STIVER 

I3S Gear) Street. Bnlta 7X8 Whitney Midi:. 

I'll- meP itlglafl G 
Oakland, Suite 1:1, Pint n,.ii. Ban* Rid*. 

Phone * takland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

.Make Your Roserv.il i'oiim 

m citj Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 

Under Manac ... tit CARL S. STAXLEV 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • * • 
JBWELS In Platinum 

• • • • a • 

REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • • 

UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Kp ping Watches 

• • • • • • 

FINE JEWELRY Of All Di -. riptions 

• • • • • « 

EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1922 





irriNflNOAv 

By P. N. BERINGER 




BUSINESS in the aggregate shows im- 
provement, and that statement is well 
borne out by the records. For instance, we 
said repeatedly in November that the busi- 
ness of that month, while bad, was better 
than the year before. Now the figures are 
available rind these bear out just what we 
have been saying right along. Since Novem- 
ber the state of business has been very 
slowly getting better and steadier. Whole- 
sale trade in all lines in San Francisco may 
be said to be good, and retail trade, despite 
the expected seasonal slump right after the 
holidays, holds up very well indeed. This 
does not mean, as yet, that trade is normal, 
but from what the retailers say it is better 
than it has been for the past five months. 

Collections are made with less trouble 
than they have been, and merchants are 
finding that people are paying up more 
promptly. In this instance, too, times are 
still out of joint, and there is yet a great 
deal of time wasted in waiting for the slow 
ones to pay. There is improvement, how- 
ever, and that is encouraging. 

San Francisco exporters and importers 
should now turn their attention toward Mex- 
ico. It is one of a very few countries show- 
ing a great activity in business and a desire 
to trade with this country. It will be sur- 
prising, to some of our readers, to learn of 
the vast increase in business since 1910. In 
the year 1910 trade between the United 
States and Mexico amounted to $124,951,- 
440, and in 1921 this was increased to 
$341,808,000. 

¥ * * 

Speaking of the export and import trade 
of San Francisco makes one think of the 
very general weeding out process that has 
been going on in the weary months of the 
slump in foreign trade just passed. This 
weeding out has swept San Francisco clear 
of many of the mushroom concerns which 
sprang in existence during and just after 
the war, as well as of such concerns which 
devoted themselves either in a large or a 
small way to commodity gambling. Most of 
these firms, either large or small, have gone 
out of business or are on their way to a 
quiet liquidation. And it is better for every- 
one concerned that this should be so. For- 
eign trading is clean business, but the profits 
to be made, though steady, are not phenom- 
enal, and it is only through a period of a 
war, such as that which we have just gone 
through, that men may become rich over 
night in commodity gambling in foreign 
trade. With time, San Francisco's trade with 
the world at large will grow to very large 



proportions, but such a growth may only be 
achieved by the most conservative business 
methods. 

The argument advanced in Oakland 
against the building of the bay bridge is of 
the quaintest for lack of sound logic to base 
it upon. If the bridge is to have the effect 
of making Oakland a "way station" in traf- 
fic of all kinds, why not put up a strenuous 
objection to the use of the ferry boats? 

So Great Britain is to make Egypt a free 
state and give her a parliamentary body. 
The modern British statesman is of such a 
character that he sees farther ahead than of 
yore, and his tactics will go much farther 
in creating stability for the greatest modern 
liberal empire than those employed by his 
predecessors. The next, and the most diffi- 
cult, problem of all is India. 

* * * 

Shipping — Mr. A. P. Hammond, formerly 
the manager here for the Luckenbach peo- 
ple, is now Coast manager for the Atlantic, 
Gulf & Pacific Company. Mr. Hammond is 
a man who is extremely well qualified for 
the position to which he has been appointed 
and he has a host of friends in the business 
world. 

The miserable nuisance caused by the dis- 
charge of oil refuse or residue in the waters 
of the bay calls for the attention of the 
officers of the law. Oil on the waters is a 
fire menace, and besides that is injurious to 
the fish and the wild water fowl. Those 
caught disposing of oil waste or refuse in 
this way should be made to suffer the full 
penalty of the law. 

* * * 

Representative Hicks of New York has 
introduced a resolution in Congress request- 
ing President Harding to call a conference 
of maritime nations for the consideration of 
the pollution of waters by the discharge of 
refuse oil. The resolution calls for a con- 
ference among the nations for the control 
and regulation of the discharge of oil refuse 
by vessels under their control. 

* * * 

Insurance— Leslie F. Rice and Philip L. 
Pearce have been made district managers 
for the Equitable Life Assurance Society. 
They will work out of Oakland. 
¥ * * 

The Nevada Fire Insurance Company has 
bought the California building, at Sacra- 
mento and Leidesdorf streets. 
« * * 

It is pretty well established in the mind 
of our very effective fire chief that the fire 



bug is a stern reality in San Francisco and 
he has asked the co-operation of the equally 
efficient chief of the police department in 
stamping the gentry out. Here's to them 
both, and success. 

The Marsh & McLennan "dinner-dances" 
are bound to be a success, and will go far 
toward creating an esprit de corps. 

Resident Vice-President McClure Kelly 

will have an efficient assistant secretary for 

the Indemnity Insurance Company of North 

America in Eugene D. Mitchell, now holding 

that office. 

* * ¥ 

Mining — The Tonopah Extension is re- 
ported as having struck commercial ore in 
many places in the 1880-foot workings. The 
report comes of good ore being struck in 
the Ohio shaft of the West End. From Vir- 
ginia City we have a story of high-grade in 
the Ophir mine. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Steadily increasing interest is shown in 
oil mining operation in California, and it is 
safe to say that the explored and tested area 
in oil sections will be very much increased 
in the coming year. 

The Big Shipping Merger — The general 
arguments that were advanced by repre- 
sentatives of Portland when they refused to 
take action, for or against, but voiced such 
objections, in a general way, and these ob- 
jections are really worthy of consideration. 
A combine would stifle the time-honored 
competition which has marked and made 
possible ail American business progress. One 
big company will face the greatest problem 
in being fair to the different ports. These 
ports are and should be competitive, the 
one to the other. The objection was made 
that the idea was new, untried and unneces- 
sary. That it had never been made use of 
here or elsewhere. That it was unique for 
one department of the government to insist 
on a monoply organization in shipping when 
the Department of Justice was sternly prose- 
cuting every business in every direction for 
violations of the Sherman anti-trust law. 
Portland, however, is not definitely to be 
classed as opposed to the big merger, and 
Mr. J. C. Ainsworth, president of the United 
States National Bank of Portland, is on the 
committee, going to Washington with Mr. 
Fleishhacker. 

¥ * ¥ 

Representative Nolan has revitalized the 
project, now before Congress, for the estab- 
lishment of free zones at various American 
ports. This is a measure which should win 



Money in Grain 

$12.50 buys guaranteed option on 10,000 bushels 
of wheat or corn. No further risk. Amovemenl 
of 5c from price gives you an opportunity to 
take $500; 4c, $400; 3c, $300. etc. Write tor 
particulars and free market letter. 

INVESTORS' DAILY GUIDE 

Southwest Bromh, Desk co, 1004 Baltimore Ave. 
Kansas City, Mo, 



February 4, 1922 

the enthusiastic support of every member 
of the House and Senate of the Congress, 
and yet has many opposed to its being en- 
acted as a law. This opposition is due to a 
misunderstanding of the purport of the law 
and of the objects for which such a free 
zone is to be used. Just a little study by 
our legislators and such business men as still 
oppose this proposed law would remove all 
objections and the law would pass. A free 
zone at San Francisco would make of this 
one of the greatest of the world's ports. 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



JOY-RIDING DAYS OVER 

"The joy-riding days of the automobile 
are pretty well past, and so are the joy-rid- 
ing days of the automobile industry," says 
a leading Eastern manufacturer. "The eco- 
nomic usage of automobiles is now greatest 
of importance. The work of the automotive 
engineer is going to become tremendously 
more important, because he must adjust the 
industry to economic needs." 



"What are you doing, Marjory?" "I'se 
writing a letter to Lily Smif." "But, darling, 
you don't know how to write." "That's no 
diff'ence, mamma; Lily don't know how to 
read." — Boston Transcript. 



Cummunity Homes 

SPLENDID BUILDINGS on RUSSIAN 
HILL UNION TERRACE — Nearing 
completion; marine view; courts and 
fountains. Separate entrances. CAPO DI 
MONTE — Class "A" structure; plans to 
suit buyers. Ground will be broken al 
once This EVOLUTION In HOMES com- 
bines more conveniences, more comforts, 
at lower prices! less upkeep cost. 

W. F.CHIPMAN, 625 Market St. 



PACIFIC <i\s AND ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 



80th Consecutive Quarterly Dividend <>» 
Firsi Preferred stock 
The regular dividend, for the three 
months ending January sisi. i :>_':;. of 

$1.50 per Bhare, upon the full-paid First 
Preferred Capita] Stock of the Company 
will he paid nn February 16th, 1922, i<> 
shareholders of record at the end of the 
Quarterly period. Chirks will be mailed 
in time to reach stockholders on Hie dale 

they are payable. 

A I-\ HOCKENBEAMER, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

San Francisco. California. 




15 



mowm . 



tgg^^^&mis: 



Motor Business Still Advances 

STATISTICS compiled from as authori- 
tative sources as possible by automotive 
industries show that a total of 10,449,785 
motor vehicles were in use in the United 
States during 1921. These include passen- 
ger cars and trucks. The motor trucks and 
smaller commercial vehicles represent about 
1,000,000. New York, which has consist- 
ently held the lead in State motor registra- 
tion, still holds the leading position with a 
total of 754,085, while Ohio is a close sec- 
ond with 742,713. Pennsylvania was third 
with 689,589 cars, and California fourth 
with 674,830. Nevada was last with 10,819. 

The actual gain in 1921, which will about 
equal the gain of 1,335,955 in 1920, ex- 
ceeds the predictions of some of the most 
optimistic estimators. 

There was also a large corresponding gain 
in motor fees. The 10,000,000 and more 
motor vehicle owners paid the magnificent 
sum of $98,449,925 into their respective 
State treasuries. This total, moreover, lacks 
the motor receipts from fourteen States, and 
when obtainable it is estimated that the an- 
nual motor bill paid for registry and licenses 
will exceed $110,000,000. At the present 
estimate, the gain is $7,474,527 over 1920. 

The figures show that despite the period 
of business depression the sale of automo- 
biles has progressed. Sales have gone on to 
as great an extent as they did when times 
were normal. It is quite true that not as 
many cars are produced as American fac- 
tories are capable of producing, but such a 
situation may be accounted for in several 
ways. In the first place production capacity 
expanded during the war. Since the war, 
exports have fallen off to a considerable 
extent, due to unfavorable rates of exchange. 
The export business, however, was not at a 
complete standstill in 1921. and when the 
number of cars that were sent abroad is 
taken into consideration the domestic regis- 
tration figures assume still larger propor- 
tions. 

In the proportion of cars to population. 
California takes the ascendency, having a 
car for every 5.19 persons. Last year her 
ratio was 6.02. South Dakota, while still 
holding second place, has one car for every 
5.33 persons instead of one for every 5.24 
Iowa, formerly one of the banner States, 
has dropped back, her registration decreas- 
ing by 7297 in 1921, and instead of the 
ratio of 5.3 persons per car there is now a 
ratio of 7.31. Nebraska takes third place, 
with one car for every 5.34 of population. 
New fork's average is one to 13.77 persons, 
while the national percentage is one auto- 
mobile to every 10.10 persons. 



Stealing of Automobiles 

Automobile thieves in New York stole 
more than 6000 cars during the twelve 
months of 1921. According to the official 
lists 4853 automobiles were reported as 
stolen during the year. Approximately 2000 
additional machines were not included in the 
reports because they were recovered within 
forty-eight hours following the sending out 
of an alarm. Figuring on $1000 as an 
"average" price per car, the loss last year 
represents close to $5,000,000. 

Where do the cars go? The consensus 
of opinion among insurance officials indi- 
cates that a large percentage are taken to 
the Canadian border for bootlegging pur- 
poses. This is partly substantiated by the 
fact that hundreds of machines being used 
in this illicit traffic have been confiscated by 
the Government. Many southern states have 
a magnet of attraction for Ford cars, more 
than 2000 of which were reported stolen in 
1921. The average daily list of cars carried 
off in New York amounts to twenty. About 
95 per cent of the machines taken are in- 
sured against theft. 



Authorized Simonizing Stations 




Painting and Upholstering Depart- 
ed to furnish estimates 

■ 

If your off!) r home furniture looks 

dull or ding) send t ■ Mr, 

California Simonizing Co. 

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Han Friitui-. 11 Oaklund 

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OAR \<.t West of Chicago 

The Century 



Two Block, from I'nion Kq 

Ir7fi poefl Street San FrnncNi-o, Calif. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1922 




PlyEASURD'S WAND 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Alcazar 

"Haunted House!" What memories that 
brings! Reflections run the whole gamut 
from childhood's earliest recollections, and 
end very hazzily with this week's perform- 
ance at the Alcazar. 

Gladys George and Dudley Ayres, ably 
supported by Ben Erway and the others, 
provide a delightful few hours without let- 
ting the audience in on the mystery till the 
last minute. There is not a dull moment 
from start to finish — one of those plays it 
is easy to sit and laugh at. There were one 
or two little slips, but those happen in the 
best regulated families, and there is plenty 
to make up for the lapses. 



laugh from the patrons. A fine bill through- 
out. 



Good Music at California 

While in "Rent Free" Wallace Reid con- 
tinues his work of the immediate part, there 
is nothing unusual or entertaining in this 
picture. Theme impossible, acting lacking 
in freshness and humor misplaced, about 
covers this effort. To make up for this, 
however, the wary management is catering 
to the best element of their patrons with 
a highly successful musical treat. Madame 
Wynne and Misses Vecki and Simmilet give 
a splendid interpretation of parts of Pag- 
liacci. This is followed by two splendid 
numbers by Heller's Orchestra, though he 
throws a wrench into the entertainment, so 
to speak, by a jazzy third number. But 
then we can't expect everything at a movie. 



De Mille's Latest at Imperial 

One wonders whether Cecil De Mille's 
"Saturday Night" is offered as a problem 
play or an attempt at comedy. There is a 
goodly mixture of both, with Edith Roberts, 
Jack Mower, Leatrice Joy and Conrad 
Nagel doing most of the struggling in the 
nine reels. Doubtless this film will meet 
with the same favor his previous ones have. 

A little musical diversion is presented by 
Lady Lo Wah of the local Oriental colony, 
and Saslavsky brings up the finish with 
selections suitable to the possibilities of his 
"little symphony." Short reels round out 
the program. 



Granada's Gnosis 

"Three Live Ghosts" is one of the livest 
comedies we have had the pleasure of see- 
ing for quite a time. No need to compare 
it with the play; it has merit enough of its 
own. Anna L. Nilsson and Norman Kerry 
are the principals in this merry film, which 
is given in a truly artistic London back- 
ground. 

Nor is this all we are offered. Something 
new in the "usherette" line happens on the 
stage. Severi and Wallace are in their ele- 
ment, and Tony Sarg's almanac also takes a 



New Tolheroh Play at Players' 

Dan Totheroh's latest one-act play, 
"Exiles," is to be given at the Players Thea- 
ter during the February program. "Exiles" 
is of the same tense quality as "The Break- 
ing of the Calm," which is going into vaude- 
ville. Mr. Totheroh is preparing a book of 
one-act plays, chief among them being his 
prize play, "In the Darkness," which won 
the New York United Neighborhood Houses 
prize last summer. His new three-act play, 
"Wild Birds," has just won the Greek Thea- 
ter prize. The production also of "Charles 
the Simple," by Ben Purrington, distin- 
guishes the February bill at the Players. 



Columbia's Sparkling Comedy 

Direct from The Playhouse in New York, 
before Chicago or any of the big in-between 
places that usually take advantage of us 
because they are first geographically, comes 
Oliver Morosco's "Wait Till We're Married" 
to San Francisco. It's as new as paint, and 
as bright and shining. The laughable diffi- 
culties of two lovable lovers furnish enough 
material for the play, and the appealing 
personality of Terry Duffy, who heads the 
company, gives to this farce-comedy a dif- 
ferent tone, somehow. There are those in 
the audience who feel that this distinguished 
and most likeable young actor is better than 
his play — but evidently he believes that any- 
thing worth doing is worth doing well, and 
pus his very best into the part of the high- 
souled, human young Irish lover. The New 
York cast is intact and includes Marie Van 
Tassel, Barbara Brown, Mary Hill, Fanny 
Yantis, Ted Gibson, William Austin, Andrew 
Arbuckle and Maxwell Paley. 



Orpheum All 'Round Good Show 

The many sides of vaudeville entertain- 
ment are all reflected this week at the 
Orpheum, and the result is a well-balanced 
bill that is a credit to the discriminating 
management. The clever little one-act play 
by S. J. Kaufman, "Kisses," has a great 
deal more in it than the name would imply. 
A man makes a bet that he will make four 
women kiss him voluntarily within fifteen 
minutes. The sketch is deliciously subtle and 
well acted. William Gaxton, a handsome 
young actor of considerable ability, plays 
the leading role and is supported by a capa- 
ble company. This is the son of thing that 
lifts vaudeville up into the high places of 
theatrical amusement. 

Remarkably fine character work is done 
in the studies called "Old Cronies," by 
Lydell and Macy, showing both pathos and 
humor. AI Wohlman has a novel line which 
he follows up with spirit and effect. The 



Cameron Sisters are prime favorites, and 
justly so, for their dancing is charming. 
Lilian Scarlet and Dane Claudius and their 
banjos make a favorable impression on that 
large part of the audience that loves to hear 
the "old songs over again." Eddie Buzzell 
and his company in "A Man of Affairs" are 
continuing their success for another week, 
and Nat Nazarro with his "Buck and Bub- 
bles" are also making more friends. The 
Five Avalons make sport of the laws of 
gravity and do some hair-raising wire walk- 
ing in the air. 



Alcazar's New Bill 

"Scrambled Wives," a brilliant comedy, 
will inaugurate another week of fun at the 
Alcazar, beginning Sunday afternoon, Feb- 
ruary 5. It will serve as the medium for the 
reappearance of Emily Pinter, for several 
years a popular member of the Alcazar 
players, who has been re-engaged for an- 
other season. 

"Scrambled Wives" was produced in New 
York at the Fulton Theater with Juliette 
Day and Roland Young in the leading roles. 
The principal parts in the Alcazar produc- 
tion will be in the hands of Gladys George 
and Dudley Ayres, supported by an all-star 
cast of players. 



Orpheum Next Week 

The Four Marx Brothers will be head- 
liners in next week's bill at the Orpheum. 
Twelve people support them in their sketch, 
"On the Balcony." Other favorites in next 
week's bill will be Lydia Barry, in songs; 
the Innis Brothers, in musical duologue; 
Lane and Byron, in "Listen, Bertie"; Lang 
and Vernon, in "Who Is Your Boy?"; La 
Pilarica Trio, Spanish dancers from Spain; 
Garcinetli Brothers, extraordinary acrobats. 
Lydell and Macy are the only holdoveis. 



"I say, Madge, it's bitterly cold. Hadn't 
you better put something on your chest?" 
"Don't worry, old thing. I've powdered it 
three times." — London Mail. 



SAMFRAHCISCO 



m NA\>Dt<nu.t 




MA ™,f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Logos 



February 4, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



PROMOTION OF POPULAR R. R. MAN 

The appointment of James B. Duffy as 
general passenger agent of the Atchison, 
Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, to succeed the 
late John J. Byrnes, has been highly com- 
mended in railroad circles and by the public. 

Duffy has been assistant general passen- 
ger agent for the Santa Fe in San Francisco 
for several years, and the new assignment 
will cause him to take up his headquarters 
in Los Angeles. Although one of the younger 
railroad officials, he has a reputation of be- 
ing among the keenest men of his profes- 
sion. Up to the time the Federal Govern- 
ment took charge of the rail lines of the 
country as a war measure, he was his com- 
pany's general agent for Northern Califor- 
nia, and during the war was in charge of 
the passenger business of all the roads in 
this city. San Francisco's consolidated ticket 
offices which was operated under Duffy's 
personal direction was the premier agency 
of the United States Railroad administration 
and the model of all such offices throughout 
the country. At the close of that establish- 
ment he received a flood of congratulations 
from travelers and railroad officials from all 
over the world. 

Duffy is said to enjoy a wider acquaint- 
ance of railroad patrons than any man of 
his years. 



SSK9CKSXSK^vv££2rc£^^ 



NEW FEATURES AT TECHAU TAVERN 

This famous center of revelry and joy- 
fulness, known in the history of San Fran- 
cisco cafe life as one of the places where 
every feature is new and just a little differ- 
ent, has many interesting features of enter- 
tainment that will make your sides ache 
with rollicking laughter. Pre-eminent among 
these evenings of fun and frolic are the 
amateur nights, which come on Tuesdays 
and Fridays. All during dinner and after 
the theater these budding and enthusiastic 
proteges hold forth in songs, dances and 
humorous turns, to the high amusement of 
the patrons. The earnestness of some of 
these amateurs in comparison with the qual- 
ity of the act is ludicrously pathetic. Some 
are so bad they are actually good. In fact, 
they are a scream, taken as a whole. The 
lucky dances are still a feature of the even- 
ing's entertainment. There is no competi- 
tion to these dances. Everyone has the same 
chance. It is all a question of luck. Prizes 
are Melachrino cigarettes and Gruenhagen's 
chocolates. 



LIVE COMPETITION IN MEXICO 

Although Mexico and the United States 
did $240,000,000 worth of trading with 
each other during the year 1921, which was 
a 40 per cent increase over the record for 
1920, prospects are regarded by American 
interests in this country as not at all favor- 
able for a continuation of this large inter- 
national business through the present year. 
The reason is that Mexico has suddenly be- 
come flooded with German salesmen, repre- 
senting almost every kind of manufactured 
article, from heavy machinery to hairpins. 




% KSSCKXKKttSKXSSSSKJttCXKKK^^ I 



GOVERNMENT REVENUE LESS 

Soon everybody will be making out their 
income tax statements and the Government 
will have the surprise of its life in the 
shrinkage of the amount to sustain its army 
of taxeaters. The world has never seen any- 
thing like our host of official parasites. The 
fact will be borne in upon the powers-that- 
be at Washington that economy is necessary 
unless we wish to face a huge deficit, grow- 
ing every year. If we could levy a tax upon 
beer and wine, hundreds of millions might 
be made available, but we seem to aim only 
at erratic schemes to make the load of the 
taxpayers heavier, without doing any good 
in the opposite direction. We are really suf- 
fering from a long spell of over-prosperity. 
There will be forced upon the Government 
an insistent demand that it shall withdraw 



from all lines of business and idealist proj- 
ects to hasten the millenium by socialistic 
pipe-dreams. 



MORE INJURY THAN GOOD 

The tax exemption in New York on new 
construction is really a disadvantage to the 
people most in need of low rents. The tax 
exemption is creating a boom in the con- 
struction of homes for the well-to-do — those 
who can pay $25 or more per room per 
month — and if it continues there will soon 
he an over-production of such space and 
nothing will be done for the poorer classes. 
Homes are not built for them because, with 
the present cos's of material and high cost 
and low productivity of labor, no homes can 
be built to rent for $8 or $10 per room per 
month. 



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.J. JONS LACOSTB III MH »X\I II It il BRN8K1 MITIII K I PBIGE .;. 

.> rr,'*l,l,.nt Bnpt. iiimI ( hrtnUt \n;il,-l mill ^"il K\prrt ( itiisulfini; Chemist «5» 



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California Fertilizer Works 



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Bone Meal, Etc. 

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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1922 



"There goes a man who has never quar- 
reled with his wife." "That so. How long 
have they been married?" "They're just 
leaving the parson's now." — Detroit Free 
Press. 



"This is a fashionable grill-room." "Yes, 
Tessie, all the other ladies are smoking." 
"So I see. Du you think they will put us 
out for not smoking?" — Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 



One man has prepared a blue law that 
leaves a man free to kiss his wife on Sun- 
day. But there is nothing left for an un- 
married man to do. — Toledo Blade. 



"Queer he should have so much luck 
when he's so much of a wet blanket." 
"Luck? Why, say, if that fellow should 
jump from the frying-pan into the fire, he'd 
put the fire out." — Judge. 



Visitor — "What a nice little boy your 
brother is! He doesn't want me to leave." 

Brother — " 'Course he don't. Dad's prom- 
ised him a licking as soon as you've gone!" 
— Pearson's Weekly. 



Father — "Well, son, you certainly made a 
fool of yourself! That girl robbed you of 
every cent you had." 

Son — "Well, dad, you have to hand it to 
me for picking them clever " — Yale Record. 



Teacher — "What makes you so late?" 
Boy — "Please, miss, the doctor brought a 

new little sister this morning." 

Teacher (preoccupied) — "Very good; but 

don't let it happen again, mind!" — London 

Opinion. 



"Do you think I shall live until I'm 90, 
doctor?" "How old are you now?" "Forty." 
"Do you drink, gamble, smoke, or have you 
any vices of any kind?" "No. I don't drink, 
I never gamble, I loathe smoking; in fact, I 
haven't any vices." "Well, good heavens, 
what do you want to live another fifty years 
for?" — London Mail. 



"Been having another mother's club meet- 
ing here today, Mary?" "How did you 
guess?" "By the empty cigarette box." — 
Judge. 



"How do you feel about reforming the 

movies?" "Most of the pictures I've seen 

are more to be pitied than censored." — 
Judge. 



"Who was the poet who wrote about 
'man's inhumanity to man'?" asked Mr. 
Bibbles in a choking voice. "I don't recall," 
said Mr. Jagsby. "What reminded you of 
that quotation?" "I've just discovered that 
I paid $10 for a quart of cold tea." — Birm- 
ingham Age-Herald. 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

LUNCHTCON 75c 
Served Daily — 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large 

menu, which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

FRENCH DINNER $1.50 

Including tax, week days and Sundays. 

5 to 9 p. m. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH STREET, ABOVE KEARNY 

Fhone: Pougl&B 2411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 
65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4530 Son Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Winners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. LeidesdorIT 



Quality 1866-5G Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Biirlingame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodside 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 2.10 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

Sun Francisco Phone Market 016 

Sun Mateo Phone Sun Mateo 148H 

Economy Du nihility 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Eyes 

Bother 

You? 



Guaranteed 

<^3<^0) Work at 

27 7th St. 



DR. J. P. JUHL 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 (ROCKER BUILDING 

< >pposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PVORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



RUSH TO EUROPE EXPECTED 

The New York World says that from 
present bookings on the transatlantic liners 
the coming season will witness the greatest 
revival of travel to Europe since 1914. Even 
at this time, the winter season, when traffic 
usually slumps off, the big liners are going 
across wUh almost every cabin filled. 

Not only will the tourist traffic be heavy, 
but the early bookings indicate that business 
men are sending iheir representatives across 
early to prepare for the boom that is ex- 
pected in the spring trade. In shipping cir- 
cles it is the impression that business will 
begin to hum again this spring and they are 
now preparing their ships for the big rush. 



ONLY TAME VOLCANO 

On the Island of Hawaii — the big island, 
as it is called, of the Hawaiian group — is 
located the only tame volcano in the world. 
It is a perpetual show place, performing day 
and night and at times putting on a demon- 
stration that is awe-inspiring in its grandeur 
and manifested power. On such occasions 
boat excursions are run from Honolulu and 
other island towns. It was only last March 
that Kilauea bleched forth a flood of molten 
lava that flowed in giant streams over the 
vast floor of the circular crater that sur- 
rounds the active pit of Halemaumau. The 
big crater covers an area of 2700 acres and 
is eight miles around. The pit of constantly 
boiling, steaming and screeching lava and 
gas is situated almost in the center of the 
original crater. The active volcanic pit is 
more than three miles in circumference. 



SPECULATION ON MARKS 

It is estimated by reliable authorities that 
at least 40 per cent of Germany's total issue 
of marks is held outside of Germany. There 
has been a regular mania of speculation in 
German marks. When the mark was worth 
10 cents people here and in Europe com- 
menced to buy them as a good speculation. 
When their value went down to 5 cents they 
bought more, and they continued to buy as 
the mark declined further, in the futile hope 
of an ultimate rise. Marks and municipal 
bonds have been peddled on the street and 
sold by millions in this country by the "fly- 
by-night brokers." 



DEMOCRATS SWING BACK 

An increase of I 32,669 in the Democratic 
enrollment of New York over that of last 
year and a decrease of 192,187 in the Re- 
publican enrollment from 1920, when for 
the first time there were more Republicans 
than Democrats enrolled in the City of New 
York, is shown through the enrollment fig- 
ures for 1921 which are just made public. 



"Willie, did you put your nickel in the 
contribution box in the Sabbath school to- 
day?" "No, mamma. I ast Eddie Lake, the 
preacher's boy, if I could keep it an' spend 
it fer candy, an' he gave me permission." — 
Denver News. 



TAX EXEMPTIONS IN NEW YORK 

Home builders in New York under tax 
exemption are claiming a bonus of $105,- 
000,000. 

During the first nine months of the year 
in which tax exempt home buildings had to 
be started the total involved in such projects 
was $230,000,000, which would give the 
owners a bonus of $69,000,000 for the en- 
tire ten-year period. Undertakings announced 
and plans placed with architects indicate 
that $120,000,000 more will be invested in 
this class during the coming three months, 
or until the expiration on April 1 of the 
time in which builders must start home 
structures in order to claim ten-year tax 
exemption. 

This total $350,000,000 in buildings will 
save an average of 3 per cent a year for 
ten years, according to expert estimates. The 
tax rate has been rising steadily, and indi- 
cated city expenditures for the next decade 
seem to convince municipal statisticians that 
the levy on real estate will average 3 per 
cent annually. The rate last year was 2.77. 
At an average 3 per cent a year the saving 
for ten years to owners of tax exempt build- 
ings would be 30 per cent, or $105,000,000 
on the full estimated $350,000,000. 

If the Legislature should extend the rent 
laws for one or two years as seems to be 
favored by Governor Miller and other po- 
litical leaders, the exemption bonus for home 
builders would be expanded in proportion. 
But such action by the Legislature would 
not in itself lengthen the period in which 
builders might get tax-exempt structures un- 
der way because the final permission rests 
with the Board of Aldermen. The Legis- 
lative enactment is an enabling measure and 
the initiative in regard to tax exemption de- 
tails rests with the Aldermen who are at 
liberty to put the measure into effect or 
ignore it, according as they know the public 
necessity. 



NEW IDEA TO RELIEVE TRAFFIC 

They have a new idea of relieving con- 
gestion of traffic in New York. Fifth avenue 
needs a wider road. The idea is to increase 
the 55-foot roadway to 80 feet by taking 
12.6 feet from the walks on each side, leav- 
ing them 10 feet wide, and then double- 
decking them with an artistic colonade ar- 
cade. 

"This elevation is very classic and simple 
in design and would give the effect of a 
beautiful court of honor, tending to unify 
the varied types of shops behind it," says 
the architect. "Two narrow sidewalks, each 
10 to 12 feet wide, on either side of the 
street, are far better than a wide one from 
the shopkeepers' standpoint, and the en- 
hancement in value to property owners by 
having a shop on a second story level as 
well as on the first would be great. So 
would the relief to pedestrian traffic by do- 
ing away with congestion on the upper level 
at cross streets. The upper sidewalks, too, 
would act as a marquise or shelter for shop- 
pers alighting from automobiles as well as 
on foot." 




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San Francisco 



Splendid Exhibit of Motordom's Latest 
Works Assured 

One week from today the sixth annual 
Pacific Automobile Show will open in the 
Exposition Auditorium. 

The automotive industry has staged a 
wonderful "comeback" and is due for a 
year of unprecedented prosperity. The New 
York and Chicago National shows have al- 
ways served as means of measuring buying 
tendencies and the condition of the trade in 
general. At the recent New York show, pub- 
lic interest was greater than it has been 
since the entrance of America in the recent 
world war, while the Chicago show reflected 
the same happy mood of the buyer. 

George Wahlgreen, manager of this year's 
Pacific show, states that every department 
in the automotive field will be creditably 
represented when the doors of the Exposi- 
tion Auditorium swing open. Passenger car, 
commercial car and accessory divisions are 
all to offer displays of the latest works of 
motordom, and from an educational point 
of view only the coming show will be well 
worth inspection as all of the new ideas 
developed by the country's greatest auto- 
motive engineers and body designers will be 
shown. From a decorative point of view 
this year's show should establish a high- 
water mark as regards color and artistic 
taste. The Oriental scheme, which was 
chosen some weeks ago to be the keynote 
of the show, is being skilfully carried out 
by the corps of artists and designers who 
have been at work for some time. 

This year's show will run from Saturday, 
the 1 1 th, up to and inclusive of February 
18, giving San Franciscans and Northern 
Californians plenty of opportunity to inspect 
the exhibit. Plans have been made to enter- 
tain many thousands of visitors. 

Practically every automobile dealer in this 
district will be represented, while the num- 
ber of accessory exhibitors will be much 
larger this year than ever. 



Change — Men who have lost their fingers 
do not miss them as much as formerly. 
There's nothing to measure. 



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Established 1855 
:t7-4.-» First Nu.'.t - - Ban Francisco 

ANNUAL MEETING 
The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 

The regular annual meeting of the stockhold- 
ers of The ■!> troll Works 

held at the office of the Corporal 
Fremont Street. -<an Francisco. California on 
Tuesday, the nth day of February. 1922. at the 
hour of 10 o'clock a. m.. for the pun 
electing a Board of Directors to serve for the 
ensuing vear. and the transaction of such other 
business as mav come before the meeting- 

c-ha.. NER. Secretary. 

Office. 75 Fremont Street. San Francisco. Cal. — J 



AGAINST SUNDAY LAWS 

Sunday blue laws relating to hunting and 
fishing are not favored by the New York 
State Fish, Game and Forest League. 

The chairman of the league in an appeal 
to the press says: 

"The sentiment of the league is that if 
Sunday shooting and fishing are stopped, a 
great many poor men will have little, if any, 
opportunity to enjoy field sports. We be- 
lieve that in the neighborhood of cities 
where there is too much shooting and where 
it interferes with the proper observance of 
the Sabbath, shooting should be stopped by 
local regulation, but that where it is away 
from the centers of population and where it 
does not interfere with the peace of the 
community, it is not only unjust to prohibit 
this form of enjoyment, but also unwise as 
interfering with innocent recreation and 
quite likely diverting the individual to some 
other less wholesole form." 



"He doesn't seem to manage his wife as 
well as he used to." "You see one day he 
happened to tell her that he was doing it." 
udge. 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund , 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 31st 
March,1921 




.$ 24,826,000.00 
. 17,125,000.00 

. 24,826,000.00 



$ 66,777,000.00 



$37S,462,443.00 

OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

358 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31st, 1921 

Assets $ 71,851,299.62 

Deposits 68,201,299.62 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - 2,650,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ---___ 371,753.46 

A Dividend of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4H) per cent per annum wa» 
declared for the six months ending December 31, 1921. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



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No visitor should leave the city with- 
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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1922 



LOS ANGELES 





RESPONSIBILITY 

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ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1S5G 




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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




vol. xaC 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, E. C, England 
Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— If Fatty Arbuckle should go free on his third trial, it will take 
him a year to fatten up again to comedy form. 

— We read so much about death mowing down millions in Rus- 
sia, one wonders how all the writers of Russian horrors escaped. 

— Playwrights will not be needed any longer in movieland. The 
court reports and coroners' cases will furnish all the thrillers needed. 

— If Ford's purchase of the Lincoln Motor Car Company starts 
consolidation in the auto business, where will Van Ness avenue 
get off? 

— Santa Rosa banks have petitioned Congress for beer and wine. 
Better petition for those than have a large crop of bootleg million- 
aires building fine apartment houses. 

— President David Barrows of the University of California thinks 
it should be study first and football afterwards. Athletics are splen- 
did, but no need to make them all we live for, like taxation. 

— Isn't it about time for the newspapers to quit publishing the 
portraits of ladies in the divorce court? Get something novel — 
portraits of beauties who hide their thin shanks in cold weather. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The yellow editor is an ordinarily good man who goes home 
to his bed happy with the thought that he has raised hell on his 
watch and the whole town will be talking about it next morning. 

* * * 

— There is an agitation of educators over unpatriotic school his- 
tories. Why worry much? Nine-tenths of history is incorrect hear- 
say, and the other tenth bunk for Fourth of July orators to quote. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— M. H. De Young gave his fellow citizens a fine park museum, 
and now he's giving subscribers bungalows and touring cars. Pity 
more of our public men haven't some of the noted publisher s pep. 

* * * 

—The extension of the State Capitol, to cost $3,000,000. is a 
move in the wrong direction. The building should be cut down a 
quarter, if anything, and sessions held once in twenty years — or 
never. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1922 



No. 6 



—State Superintendent Will C. Wood is training for Governor, 
'tis said. He ought to be qualified as a standard-bearer of taxeaters, 
having added about $10,000,000 to teachers' salary raises in one 
year. 

* * * 

-—Bald-headed old grand-dads fifty years hence will stroke their 
whiskers and relate "When I wuz in the fust grade in school, they 
wuz just startin' to try ole Fatty Arbuckle, by heck!" How the 
years do fly! 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— St. Patrick's Day orations will lose none of their punch, for 
the Terrence McSwinny wing of Hibernian patriotism is busy as 
ever organizing "against the government"— Michael Collins now, 
not John Bull. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Julius Kahn thinks it is too soon for the soldiers' bonus, but 
a tax on beer and wine, Julius, would furnish the money and no- 
body would feel it. Why lose billions of dollars to make fanatical 
health faddists happy? 

¥ * ¥ 

— Our genial auditor, Tom Boyle, said our police courts do not 
earn enough in fines; and now the yellow newspapers want Tom to 
put the shyster tribunals on a paying basis. A wise official draws 
his salary and keeps still. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Time was when the world walked on tip-toe and held its breath 
until a new Pope was elected. Now the elevation of a Pontiff or 
King does not draw as large a crowd to the newspaper bulletin 
board as the local baseball score. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The former Crown Prince of Germany is putting his "war 
memoirs" in a book. Would that several of our ex-statesmen, who 
don't seem to know how dead they are, would follow the German 
Prince's example instead of filling the newspapers. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The eugenic marriage fans are getting space in the newspapers 
again. How on earth did the world get along all the years our fore- 
fathers and foremothers spliced up in the regular old pot-luck style, 
and raised up bouncing daughters and husky sons? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The murdered movie director, the yellow newspapers say, "kept 
in his apartment a woman's pink silk nightrobe." We insist upon 
diagrams of the garment with facsimilies of the fingerprints, for the 
children's Sunday magic pictorial chart. Now, Brother Hearst, get 
busy. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— An African belle dressed for a jungle luncheon, with the thigh 
bone of a dog stuck through her nose and four-pound window 
weights as ear-rings, hasn't got much on a frosty morning flapper 
on Grant avenue — in flesh-colored stockings and a Hudson seal coat, 
showing all the law allows above her waist and below her hips. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




Having stopped the withdrawal of whisky 
Denatured Hair Tonic from warehouses through legitimate chan- 
nels, the Volstead enforcers are concen- 
trating against the bootleggers who are murdering people by vend- 
ing beverages that get their "kick" from wood alcohol. 

A New York bootlegger who was operating three fifty-gallon stills 
in a loft over a stable was killed the other day by a gas explosion, 
which blew out the roof and set the stable on fire. The bootlegger 
had been distilling denatured alcohol, and making what he called 
"whisky." Two hundred gallons of the poisonous stuff were found 
by the firemen. 

Manufacturers of barbers' hair tonics and perfumery factories 
are under observation by the dry enforcers, but the number of fatal 
debauches amongst the patrons of bootleg beverages is still increas- 
ing. It is said that the amount of alcohol withdrawn by manufac- 
turing concerns is excessive, and the next s'.ep of the dry leaders 
will be to force the makers of hair tonics, toilet articles and per- 
fumes to use only denatured alcohol. That costs only 40 cents a 
gallon, while the price of grain alcohol is $4.70 a gallon. No doubt 
the makers of toilet articles, etc., would not pay $4.70 a gallon for 
alcohol if the 40-cent poison would do as well, but the dry leaders 
are not concerned in the deterioration of perfumes and hair tonics. 
Barbers can. rub all the denatured alcohol into customers' scalps 
that they wish, but the supply of beverage whisky that will not kill 
drinkers on the spot or make them blind must be reduced. 

When will the fanatical makers of so-called prohibition be 
stopped? Is it not time to take some steps towards the restoration 
of common sense? Invading the American barber shop and boudoir 
argues that our citizens are as irresponsible as savages, and cannot 
be trusted with alcoholic hair tonics or perfumes lest they drink 
themselves to death. We are sliding back as a nation to the old 
days when long-visaged Puritans hanged crazy old women as 
witches, believing they were in league with the devil to work 
"spells" on their neighbors. We may yet get back to the Blue Laws 
of Connecticut that fined any man who kissed his wife on Sunday. 



"Domestic trade in the United States 
Condition of Domestic Trade in its various branches continues to 

be spotty," says the New York Times 
in its weekly review. "There are porlions of the country, and nota- 
bly on the Pacific Coast, where business is quite good. In other 
sections it varies from being pretty fair to only indifferent. 

"As a whole, however, the conditions are much better than they 
were at this period a year ago, and there is a more hopeful feeling 
prevalent. In the primary markets there is yet considerable hesi- 
tancy, not only because of the uncerlainties of the price situation, 
but also because the attitude of the consumer has not been made 
clearly manifest. Until the last mentioned circumstance becomes 
more definite the retailer will not feel free to act, and this is hold- 
ing up the jobber, who does not consider himself warranted in buy- 
ing or committing himself too far ahead without seeing somewhat 
clearly the opportunity to re-sell. Meanwhile, the retailers are con- 
tinuing their efforts to clear out s'.ocks, in which they are meeting 
with a fair share of success." 



If you happened to be a summer boarder 
The Real Yellow Peril at Santa Cruz and wished to enjoy fresh 

eggs, you could not buy them, except they 
were purchased through the egg trust, though there are plenty of 
chicken farms around Santa Cruz. The trust sees that everything 



proceeds according to schedule. Perhaps even the hens are obliged 
to observe it. 

We have no quarrel with Santa Cruz on the score of its highly 
guarded egg supply. The business of the egg raisers is to conduct 
their indus'ry in the way most likely to prove profitable. We merely 
mention Santa Cruz as one of the best known places near San 
Francisco to point the moral of our tale, which is that when we 
establish any trust some outsider is sure to devise a plan to break 
it. Now American money is going into Chinese egg factories in 
China, to get some of Lie profits away from the local egg trust. 

One of the largest bakery supply houses in the United States has 
established a factory at Hankow, China, to prepare egg products, 
dried and dessicated. Twenty other American factories are said to 
be in process of organization. 

This is the "Yellow Peril" in its deadliest form — the moving of 
American capital to China, instead of the transportation of Chinese 
labor to the United States. 



There was an illumina- 
Admissions About Our Merchant Marine live discussion in the 

House of Representatives 
the other day, which it is a pity the newspaper readers of the 
United States could not hear. It concerned our merchant marine, 
which has cost over three billions. 

The discussion arose over the proposition to spend eight millions 
on the steamship Leviathan, which would be worth only six million 
after the renovation. That looked to be such poor business that 
Representative Graham of Illinois asked if it would not be better 
to take the Leviathan out and sink her, and save a couple of mil- 
lions. Then Representative Madden, also of Illinois, reviewed the 
process of creating our merchant marine. He rather reduced the 
enthusiastic hopes of his colleagues that our flag will soon again 
be on every sea, a profitable and convincing example of what a 
great democracy can do to make itself and the world safe. In con- 
densed form Mr. Madden told how the great war came in 1917. 

"We had no ships, and we had to raise a great army. We were 
sending that army abroad. We got them over there to the number 
of 2,000,000. It was found that we needed transportation facilities 
to save their lives and to provide them with their needs. The Con- 
gress liberally provided funds with which to buy or build ships. 
They did both. They undertook to operate them. We were all 
clamoring, every Member of Congress, Democrat and Republican, 
everyone in the United States, for speed. We all voted for every 
dollar with which to do the thing that we believed should be done 
to win the war. We had 2,000,000 trocps on the other side. We 
had to bring them back. It seemed the hour had come when Amer- 
ica should enter the merchant marine business, and we built a good 
many ships, more than when the war closed. We have got the fleet. 
It cost the American people $3,300,000,000. When the war closed 
freights were high, and ship after ship was sailing the seas, carrying 
the commerce of the world. The ships were all employed while that 
condition lasted. We all hoped then that conditions would continue 
as they were. The slump came. Commerce ceased. The ships were 
tied to the docks everywhere in the world. 

"We have on our hands 10,000,000 dead weight tons of ship- 
ping, 20 per cent of all the ships in the world. If we do not operate 
them, we lese large sums. If we do operate them, perhaps we shall 
lose more. It costs $3,000,000 a month to tie up those ships to the 
docks. We are losing a million a month on the ships we are oper- 
ating. If we tied up all the ships in operation we would not lose 



February II. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



any less than now. We are much in the predicament of the citizen 
who got hold of the bear's tail and didn't know whether it was 
worse to hold on or let go." 

The redeeming feature of our terrible shipping fiasco is that the 
politicians in Congress now admit that, as it costs three times as 
much as some of our business competitors to operate our merchant 
marine, thanks to our navigation laws, we cannot take (he carrying 
trade away from them in even competition. 

We must subsidize our ships, they declare. Admitting that to be 
the real solution of our merchant marine problem, we should first 
correct our navigation laws, made to please the walking delegates 
of the Pacific Coast Sailors' Union and urged to acceptance by the 
fiery Senator from Wisconsin. 



The distinction of titles by Canada is 
The Allurement of Titles regarded regretfully by the London 

Times, which thinks that the decision is 
final. Here in the United States we have a significant partiality for 
people with titles. The Times wants some order equivalent to the 
British Order of Merit, by which great personal service to the State 
is recognized without much in the way of trappings and trimmings. 
One imagines it might appear, but the wary Canadian would be 
slow to trust his Government to confer even this without graft or 
political bias. He feels he is well quit of what he considers a snob- 
bish element in his national life, and even under a change of Gov- 
ernment he is not likely to reintroduce it. 



The United States Senate is 
The Tax Question the Important One taking itself too seriously, 

says Senator Edge of New 
Jersey. He is right. Congress thinks itself a sort of superior teach- 
ers' institute, and bothers about every detail of the citizens' exist- 
ence. It is very jealous of its prerogative. 

"The thing Congress should most concern itself about is the tax 
system," declares Senator Edge. "It is the fundamental evil. It is 
keeping back every legitimate activity because investors in an en'er- 
prise are forced to pay anywhere from 40 to 65 per cent on all 
they make. The promulgation of the theory of soaking the rich to 
help the poor is having its effect in retarding capital and keeping 
the poor out of a job. 

"All will admit, no matter on what side they happen to be, that 
the country will not recover its stability until we have markets. 
What are markets? They are the creations of business activity. 
There is just as much money now as before the war, if not a little 
more, and there are just as many people, and the only way to bring 
about an exchange of commodities and money is to have the people 
working. So, to get back to the fundamen'al difficulty, so long as 
incomes from legitimate enterprises are kept pouring into the Gov- 
ernment, and not added to capital where they belong, just so long 
will we no have markets and remain exactly where we are." 



Seldom has there been made 
Pitiful Comicality in the U. S. Senate in the United States Senate 

a greater speech, in the im- 
mensity of its usefulness, than the answer of Senator Carter Glass 
of Virginia to the critics of the Federal Reserve Board at Wash- 
ington, which they charged with forcing drastic deflations ruinous 
to the cotton farmers of the South. 

Senator Heflin of Alabama charged that the Federal Reserve 
Board had loaned to themselves the sum of $18,000,000. 

"If the Reserve Board invested any of that $18,000,000 in specu- 
lating on the bear side, they made a lot of money," commented the 
Alabama Senator. 

In his reply Senator Glass characterized the statement as "ludi- 
crous misrepresentation. " "defamation of public officials." and 
"ignorance run mad." Parliamentary usage and Senatorial privilege 



could not go much farther. The Federal Reserve Board, Senator 
Glass said, has not a dollar to loan, and never had. No Federal 
Reserve Bank in the system can loan any individual, or corporation, 
in the United States, a penny. The Federal Reserve Banks neilher 
receive deposits from, nor make loans to, individuals, concerns or 
corporations. These reserve banks are banks of banks, and do 
business only with banks. Each of these banks has a defined region 
of operations. They are operated by boards of directors, just as 
any individual bank is. They are owned, not by the Government 
of the United Stales, as some suppose, but by the stockholding 
member banks. The Government of the United States never con- 
tributed a dollar to their capital. The taxpayers are not assessed 
a penny for their maintenance. On the contrary, they pay the 
Government annually an enormous sum in franchise fees — $60,- 
000,000 per annum, against the meagre sum of $3,000,000 per 
year paid by all the national banks in the United States put to- 
gether. 

If John D. Rockefeller, with all his millions, desired to borrow 
money, he would be compelled to borrow it from a local bank, 
Senator Glass said. 

"The only way that the local bank could get a dollar from the 
Federal Reserve Bank in Rockefeller's district would be to indorse 
Mr. Rockefeller's collateral note, as that of any other person, and 
put it up as security for a credit at the reserve bank. The Federal 
Reserve Board would not necessarily have any part in or knowledge 
of the transaction. 

"Aside from this, no member of the Federal Reserve Board is 
permitted by law to own one dollar of bank stock or to have any 
pecuniary interest whatsoever or connection with the operation of 
profits of any banking institution; and every member of the board 
has to take a solemn oath to this effect. Moreover, under the law, 
the Federal reserve banks are strictly prohibited from loaning one 
dollar to member banks for speculative purposes." 

The whole charge of the use of Federal Reserve funds by the 
Federal Reserve Board in Washington, Senator Glass said, "was so 
literally without foundation in fact, so saturated with misunder- 
standing of Federal Reserve banking processes and of the Federal 
Reserve Act itself, as to render it comic if it were not pitiful." 

But "pitiful comicality" and "misunderstanding" to make party 
politics and win public offices have a large part in the proceedings 
of our august Senate. 



Had Mr. De Valera been re- 
De Valera Would Be a Dictator elected he would no doubt have 

dispensed with the services of the 
whole of his opponents in the Cabinet and selected supporters of 
his own in their place. That is the opinion of the Manchester 
Guardian. "He would in effect have been dictator, and in the com- 
manding position he would then have held nothing would have been 
easier for him than to wreck the treaty." 

The treaty as drawn and ratified still has to be filled up in many 
details. Over the acceptance of those details there would be pro- 
tracted and bitter strife had De Valera the dictatorial power. So 
believes the Manchester Guardian, which holds that the final de- 
cision should rest with the Irish people and not with De Valera. 



— The railroad labor situation would be ludicrous if it were not so 
serious. The rates fixed by the Labor Board for common labor are 
so far above those prevailing outside of the railroad service that 
the companies are finding it practicable to contract out much of 
their work and save 20 to 30 per cent, which of course is after the 
contractors make a profit. 



— If sentiment is going to be the factor that will cause America 
to cancel the national debt, we wonder how a little of it would 
work on some of our creditors. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February II, 1922 




How Little We II 



By Harvey Broughan 




DURING the cold spell in the past month many people expressed 
fear that the climate of San Francisco is changing. Those 
persons, temporarily shaken in their expectation of continuous fine 
winters, as well as summers, in San Francisco, forgot the unusually 
warm weather of 1921. The average temperature last year was 
higher than usual in many parts of the world — the Eastern states, 
England and France. 

Theories about change of climate are unreliable, as people are 
only impressed by the extremes. They forget the average tempera- 
ture. One very hot or very cold day will cause them to remember 
a year as unusual, though 364 other days had been normal. The 
changes of temperature this winter were unusual and interesting, 
but it is not necessary to invent sensational theories to account for 
them. 

The temperature of the earth is produced by a nice balance of 
conditions in the atmospheric envelope, our distance from the sun 
and the inclination of our globe to it. The least disturbance of the 
balance might change the climate altogether. It would be absurd 
to suppose that a change of a few degrees of cold or heat during 
a single summer or winter must indicate continuous variability. If 
it did, our world might be a glacier or a ball of fire in twenty-five 
years. 

The one thing which remarkable changes in weather proves to us 
is that astronomers' theories are not dependable. As Shakespeare 
has said, "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than 
are known in thy philosophy." Last year the astronomers had to 
rectify their notions about sun spots because, though they were 
fewest, the earth's temperature was higher than usual. The con- 
trary was to have been expected, according to their established 
theory. Astronomically, the sun is a variable star, supposedly 
brightest when there are more sun spots. The spots exhibit marked 
changes every ten years and astronomers have various theories of 
their influence on climatic changes. But the theorists differ. It is 
also a well known fact that magnets at certain periods undergo 
changes. But none of the theorists attribute the rain storms to that 
phenomenon. 

The fact is that what the astronomers do not positively know 
about the sun, moon and stars and the weather would make a huge 
library. Brother Valviva gets much space in the newspapers be- 
cause he has it that the earth is saucer-shaped and the sky rests 
on the rim. Not many centuries ago that was the orthodox belief, 
and scientists who dared teach to the contrary were in danger of 
being burned as heretics. Their books were burned. Brother Val- 
viva would have been a bright ornament of the intellectual world 
in those days. 

How little we know of the mysteries of the universe and the influ- 
ences that direct it, is shown by our inability to see two-thirds of 
the rays of the sun. The rays exist, but we do not possess visual 
organs requisite for their translation into light. Could we but see 
those dark rays of the sun, that influence photographic plates but 
do not stimulate our optic nerves and arouse the sense of sight, our 
intelligence of Nature might be as far advanced as the brain of a 
statesman is superior to that of a worm. Crawling on the surface 
of our globe under the weight of the atmosphere which envelopes 
it, we are devoid of the power to penetrate the mystery of our 
being. Tyndell, the great British scientist, compared the human 
mind to "a musical instrument with a limited range of notes, beyond 
which in both directions we have an infinitude of silence Behind 
and above us and all around us the real mystery of the universe 



lies unsolved, and as far as we are concerned may never be solved." 
Filled with vain conceit in his achievements, man imagines him- 
self a demigod with his head in the clouds of Olympus, like Jove, 
the pagan ruler of the universe, weilder of the awful thunderbolts 
and director of the storms. In reality, the lowly crab, washed 
hither and thither by the ocean tides, and depending on them for 
his existence, is more suggestive of man's real place in nature. He 
cannot fly as the eagle, or run as the deer. He comes into the world 
knowing nothing of the purpose of his existence, and departs wi'.h 
no greater insight than he possessed when he arrived. Yet with all 
his limitations, man asserts his authority over the earth he had no 
hand in creating. He makes maps of the globe and prescribes where 
and how the inhabitants shall reside, "and what they shall do to 
insure their salvation in a heaven of which he knows nothing, for 
he is absolutely ignorant of the great secrets of his own terrestrial 
existence. 

Shakespeare had it right: "There are more things in heaven and 
earth, Horatio, than are known in thy philosophy." 



RESURRECTION DAY DOGMA NOT IMPERATIVE 

The Bishop of Oxford has declined to investigate the charge of 
heresy against the Rev. H. D. A. Major, editor of the Modern 
Churchman, who recently preached, by invitation of the Vice- 
Chancellor, a sermon at the Oxford University Church which has 
shaken up the clergy of the Church of England. The people who 
remained in the churches, Mr. Major said, "did not, as a whole, 
represent the more intelligent and vital elements of our community." 
The decline in the number of baplisms and in the attendance of 
Sunday School children was startling. 

The Bishop of Oxford's decision not to try the Rev. Major for 
heretical preaching indicated to him, he said, that "the Church of 
England no longer insists on the primitive and mediaeval belief that 
the corpse laid in the grave will rise again at the last day, although 
many generations have lived and died in that conviction." 



AMERICA LAND OF OPPORTUNITY 

B. Seebohm Rowntree, a London business man, writes in the 
Westminster Gazette: "What is the impression of American indus- 
try left on the mind of an English business man? First and fore- 
most, that America still remains the land of opportunity. Her 
industry is nascent. A sense of growth — vigorous, feverish growth 
— forces itself upon one. The whole people are on the march — no 
one means to stop where he is. The immigrant from Central or 
Eastern Europe — often a down-trodden, oppressed soul — will not for 
long live in the East Side of New York, where he has landed. That 
is but a perch where he rests after his long flight across the ocean." 



REMARKABLE TRAIN EFFICIENCY 

Of the 69,761 passenger trains handled over the Pacific System 
of the Southern Pacific Company during 1921, 93.4 per cent ar- 
rived at destination on time. The record of efficiency in 1920 was 
90 per cent of passenger trains arriving on time. This is an increase 
of 3.4 per cent. This showing is considered remarkable, especially 
in view of the high mountain ranges that divide parts of the Pacific 
System as well as other operating difficulties. 



February II, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



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IN the opinion of Representative James A. Gallivan of Massa- 
chusetts, "the Volstead act is what is hamstringing the United 
States shipping business." The opinion was expressed in the debate 
on January 27 in the House of Representatives on the advertising 
appropriation for the Shipping Board for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1923. Congress estimates that the deficit of the Shipping 
Board will be $50,000,000. The present head of the Board, being 
a live advertising man, is of the opinion that the right way to keep 
the deficit within limits is by advertising. 

By expending half a million on advertising the deficit could be 
kept below $50,000,000. The Congressmen, having wasted such 
vast sums in creating and operating a merchant marine, are shy of 
appropriating half a million more on advertising the costly experi- 
ment. In a general way they approve of advertising to improve 
business, but $500,000 — that staggered them. 

Representative Wood of Indiana urged liberality in the. adver- 
tising scheme, and produced figures to show what various private 
shipping companies are spending on publicity — the Cunard Line, 
$200,000; the French Line, $75,000; the Holland-American Line, 
$35,000, etc. Representative Wood said that prior to the world war 
the Hamburg-American Line alone expended $700,000 a year on 
advertising. Representative Wood made a vigorous appeal for the 
United States shipping business. 

"Now if we are to continue in this shipping business," he said, 
"or are to go out of this business, it is wise to conduct it so that 
when we do get out we can get out to some advantage. That is 
the purpose of advertising. We have some 440 vessels of all kinds, 
operating on eighty routes. 

"Has the Shipping Board not got an advertising staff now with- 
out giving a commission of 15 per cent compared with the gigantic 
character of the shipping venture undertaken by the United States, 
Congress should not be mean in its appropriations and thereby 
'hamstring the shipping business,' " argued Mr. Woods of Indiana. 

Then it was that Representative Gallivan of Massachusetts ex- 
pressed in some very plain words his views on hamstringing ship- 
ping business and what had really hamstrung it. He said: 

"I do not like to occupy the position of attempting to hamstring 
the Shipping Board; but if you allow them to spend more than 
$700,000 to advertise their ships they are not going to meet with 
the success that that amount of money would ordinarily bring to 
them through their advertising for passengers to go on ships. This 
board and its ships have been hamstrung by the Volstead law; our 
fellow citizens will not sail on 'dry' shins when they can get a 'wet 
one; and you could give them twice what is estimated for on this 
budget of theirs and they cannot get the people to travel on their 
ships. What is the use of disguising that (act? That is the trouble 
we have got to face .and we might as well admit it. With the 
expenditure for advertising of $1,700,000. they would not get the 
number of passengers that all the other private lines will get with 
a total expenditure of only $600,000. and they will never get what 
the chairman of the Shipping Board is now hoping to get, a fair 
portion of the immigration which is coming to this country, because 
the immigrants' personal habits are interfered with on the Shipping 
Board vessels, and it is repugnant to ordinary human beings wher- 
ever they are horn, to have their personal habits interfered with. 

Mi. Cable; "11 the gentleman will permit, would not the immi- 
grants rather come on American ships than not come at all? 

Mr. Gallivan: "I suppose that is true, that rather than not come 
at all. if that is the only chance they would have, namely, to come 



;S[it]SIS]R*G 



on these boats, as a last resort they would come in Shipping Board 
vessels; but that is no argument, in my judgment. The whole trou- 
ble is that the Shipping Board is hamstrung by Vols'eadism; and I 
dare say it is hoped that by this enormous expenditure of money 
to overcome the handicap which the Volstead law has put on our 
American Shipping Board ships. Most of this enormous sum of 
money will not bring results, and every man who listens to me and 
is familiar with conditions knows that I am telling facts. Why run 
away from them?" 

From this dialogue the proposition of the Drys in Congress would 
appear to be that immigrants should be forced to come on cold 
water ships or never get here. Prohibition certainly is carrying 
Uncle Sam over a very rocky road with many queer twists. 



THE UNITED STATES LEADS 

The United States leads in thirteen out of the thirty most impor- 
tant minerals. No other coun'ry, by way of contrast, leads in more 
than two. Russia leads in platinum and manganese; Spain in pyrite 
and mercury, and some other nations have one or two minerals in 
which they lead. Germany leads in potash, but here is the United 
States leading in thirteen out of thirty, and, if second place were 
counted, we also have a good many more points coming to us. 

It is hard to appreciate the rapid growth of our mineral industry 
in the United States. Starting as an agricultural nation, with timber 
and fur resources on the side, we have become more and more of 
an industrial nation, and our great and varied industry is based 
upon mineral raw materials. The value of our mineral product has 
increased eighteen-fold in forty years. 



RELATIVE COSTS 



An analysis of changes in wages, commodity prices and living 
costs throughout the Uni'ed States from 1914 down to the end of 
1921 shows that wage increases ran ahead of living costs in 1918, 
and at the peak, early in 1920, average wages had increased ap- 
proximately 134 per cent over 1913. The cost of living increase 
for the same period was about I 16 per cent. Since then both living 
costs and commodity prices have declined more rapidly than the 
wages of industrial workers. Comparing present commodity price 
and living cost levels with those in 1913, the wage level of the aver- 
age employed worker is relatively higher than the cost of living and 
price levels. 



E OROPE'3 FAMOUS WONDER GLASS 
\ MARVELOUS NEW INVENTION 

The "Binoculette" 



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H Aetna! 

Size 



A COMBINED OPERA ami FIELD DI kSS Inn l>p mrrlril In 

miin'» *<•*( i><>. k.-t of lml>- PHP-.P. iiml w rich* only 2H ounre 
(TMfvl Iniliior* nr Out. K,-cul«r Prlre S3.V00. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Optical Expert and Import en of Optical Specialties 

_'7 Tears In San 
9fi0 M;irkt-t Street, i>ft«rrn Mseea bthI Taylor Street* 
PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11. 1922 




'Har&CncriyOotlK'MaraiKxr 



— The suggestion of the News Letter that at least some pretense 
should be made of collecting the $40,000 left to Golden Gate Park 
by Honora Sharpe, widow of a well-known lawyer, is having some 
influence. The widow died seventeen years ago and willed $200,000 
to the Golden Gate Park Commissioners, for a gateway at the Pan- 
handle entrance. Years are rolling by, and the gateway has not 
been started. A generation may pass away and see nothing done. 
It occurred to the News Letter that at least some definite reason 
should be obtained from the man said to be responsible for the 
delay. 

— Samuel G. Murphy, formerly president of one of the national 
banks in San Francisco, is said to be the man responsible for the 
delay in carrying out the wishes of the Widow Sharpe. He was 
not responsible for all the delay. The widow's legacy did not 
amount to $200,000. Her estate had shrunk, and only $80,000 
could be realized. Of that amount Mr. Murphy held $40,000 in 
trust, and when the Supervisors said they would insist on receiving 
the $200,000 left for the park gate in the widow's will, the banker 
kept in his pocket the $40,000 he held in trust. It no doubt ap- 
peared to him to be the correct banking solution of the problem. 

— Banker Murphy reasoned the matter out quite logically and 
ethically as a banker. It would be manifestly impossible to give the 
Supervisors any more of the Widow Sharpe's estate than he held 
in trust, and that was only $40,000. But the Supervisors refused 
$40,000. What could he do? He could not give the widow's trust 
money away to anybody he met in the street or at his club. Obvi- 
ously the ethical proceeding was to keep the $40,000 himself, and 
he did. He has kept it in his pocket all of the seventeen years the 
widow has been dead. 

— And the strange part of the proceedings is that he seems to 
have had little trouble to keep the widow's donation in his pocket. 
Nobody seems to have tried very hard to separate him from the 
$40,000. The Park Commissioners wrote to him to pay up, but 
how could he pay, when the city fathers would not give him a 
receipt unless he turned over the $200,000 specified in the widow's 
will, which never materialized? 

— The simplest and most business-like plan was obviously to hold 
on to the $40,000 until the city pressed for the payment; but every 
year there seemed less likelihood of that. After seventeen years one 
need not lie awake nights, nervous that the sheriff, or chief of 
police, or the city auditor, or any other official of the city and 
county of San Francisco would wake him up and shout "Hand 
over that money — the $40,000 that Honora Sharpe left for Golden 
Gate Park gates. You've had it long enough!" 

— It is an interesting sidelight on the way the business of the 
city is conducted. But it is so easy to get $40,000, or $400,000, 
out of the taxpayers' pockets that the Widow Sharpe's donation is 
not worth bothering about. 

— It is said that ex-Banker Murphy has left New York, where he 
now resides, to come to San Francisco and talk over the widow's 
$40,000 with the City Attorney. The latter, acting on the sugges- 
tion of the News Letter, has begun a law suit against Mr. Murphy. 
Perhaps the ex-banker will demand an apology from the city gov- 



ernment for bothering him about irrelevant, trifling matters, when 

one wants all his time to read up on the income tax. 
* * * 

— Governor Stephens says that "the success of our form of gov- 
ernment depends upon the public understanding of, and the con- 
fidence in, the acts of our public servants." A fine phrase, Governor, 
but the public cannot understand the acts of our public servants, 
for the patriotic gentlemen don't understand their acts themselves. 
And as to public confidence in them, God forbid anyone could be 
so foolish; and lastly, but not leastly, we have no such thing as 
public servants. They are all our lords and masters, to whom we 
meekly bend our necks and let them wipe their shoes on our coat- 
collars. 

— "It is a wise man who considers the purchasing power of 
money," said Senator Carter Glass of Virginia in the United States 
Senate recently. "There are superficial people who would rather 
receive a wage of $5 a day when it costs them $6 a day to live, 
than to receive a wage of $2.50 a day when it costs them $1.50 to 
live. One signifies ruin and the other betokens thrift. Yet there are 
many people who fail to discriminate; who fail to understand the 
purchasing power of the dollar." 



WHAT RAILROAD LAND IS AVAILABLE 

The popular idea that the Southern Pacific Company is holding 
millions of acres of land at high prices in Southern California coun- 
ties, and the value of the acreage is improved by surrounding agri- 
culture, is contradicted by B. A. McAllaster, land commissioner of 
the company. 

The company, he says, owns approximately 2,000,000 acres of 
desert lands between Mojave and Needles, but this land is abso- 
lutely of no use for agricultural or grazing purposes. It is therefore 
not listed for sale in the manual of lands offered for sale to the 
public, but, like all railroad lands, is for sale if a purchaser can be 
found. Recently 15,000 acres of this land was sold for 25 cents 
an acre. 

The amount of lands suitable for agricultural or grazing purposes 
is comparatively small, and is offered to the public for very reason- 
able prices. 

The land can be bought outright or on easy payments, and the 
services of the Southern Pacific Company's farm adviser is free to 
the call of the purchasers of the land. 



ASTOUNDING PICTURE OF DESTRUCTION 

An analysis of fire losses in the United States during the five 
years ended with 1920, just completed by the Actuarial Bureau of 
the National Board of Fire Underwriters, presents an astounding 
picture of destruction, the aggregate losses for the period amount- 
ing to $1,338,178,142. 

This is the actual record compiled from 3,302,930 adjus'ers' loss 
reports. In order to ascertain the full amount of loss suffered by 
fire, 25 per cent should be added as a conservative estimate of the 
damage wrought by unreported fires and those in uninsured prop- 
erty. This addition brings the grand total to $1,672,722,677. And 
most of the loss was preventable! 

It is surprising to find, in analyzing the figures, that during the 
five years under consideration the hazard of matches and smoking 
caused the greatest individual amount of damage, whereas during 
the five years ended with 1919 carelessly used electricity held first 
place. In the present compilation, however, the total for matches 
and smoking is $90,271,334 as compared with $85,735,168 for 
electricity. The third largest loss, namely, $63,324,071, was due 
to fires caused by stoves, furnaces, boilers and their pipes, while 
defective chimneys and flues came next wi'.h an aggregate of 

$61,975,786, » 



February II, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




■Hsis pw rnna a EMfflMiMiai^^ 



Pomi 



§ HOT 



Property Owners 



THE action of the Board of Supervisors in ordering the City 
Engineer to prepare an assessment district, to pay for the 
construction of the Duboce avenue tunnel, is highly important. It 
is the first official step towards the opening up of the Sunset District 
south of Golden Gate Park, which has shown no progress, though 
Richmond, on the other side of the park, has had an astonishing 
development. Buildings have been going up in every direction in 
Richmond. A very large amount of work has been accomplished 
there in the past two years, and particularly in the last year. Now 
that the open shop plan has been established in San Francisco, 
Richmond may be expected to move ahead faster than ever. The 
growth of Richmond has been largely due to the excellence of the 
car service. 

Sunset Will Awaken 

(The Duboce avenue tunnel will cause Sunset to awaken from its 
long Rip Van Winkle sleep, under the influence of the closed shop, 
and the addition of new car lines. No new lines could be built by 
the United Railroads owing to the obstructions thrown in the way 
of private lines by our city government since the policy of munici- 
pal ownership was decided on. The Duboce avenue tunnel will start 
from a point opposite the old German Hospital and pierce the hill 
to the west. The car service from the ferry to the ocean beach can 
be about thirty minutes of rapid running. Now Sunset is reached 
by the Haight street cars, which skirt Golden Gate Park on the 
south. The service of these cars is good, but not to be compared 
with the service which Richmond enjoys from the Municipal line 
on Geary street and the other lines north of it. In fact, there could 
be no district with better car service than Richmond. 

The Duboce tunnel and the Twin Peaks tunnel will place Sunset 
and all the western slopes out to Ingleside on an equality in trans- 
portation with the Richmond District. It is of great importance that 
Sunset should be properly opened up for home builders, too many 
of whom now cross the bay or go down towards San Mateo. With 
beautiful Westwood Park, Ingleside and all the expansive Sunset 
District brought close to the heart of the city, by a tunnel under 
Buena Vista Park and one under Twin Peaks, there can be nothing 
to prevent its magical transformation. 

City Engineer's Influence 

The Supervisors voted unanimously in favor of Duboce avenue 
tunnel, as the City Engineer favored that plan above all others to 
furnish a rapid service for Sunset from downtown to the ocean 
beach. Mr. O'Shaughnessy has come to be recognized as an author- 
ity on public improvements, whose advice is to be seriously con- 
sidered. He has the courage of opposing what he does not regard 
as desirable, and all the public work done under his supervision has 
been excellently and honestly done, to the great advantage of our 
growing city. 

Geary Street Boom 

The building activity on Geary street and in the apartment house 
district generally is very great. The speculators are overdoing the 
Geary street boom. It seems to be taken as certain that whate\er 
one buys on Geary street is sure to advance rapidly and show a 
good profit, but it is well to remember that it does not take many 
sales to raise the prices to prohibitive figures. 
Rent Profiteers 

The builders of apartment houses are figuring on obtaining rents 
on the present high scale. Will they be able to do so? Very likely 



not. In fact, it is almost a certainty. There are many more people 
looking for apartments at $10 a room, than $30 a room, which is 
about the present basis of valuation. The owners say they cannot 
afford to rent for less, but as a matter of fact most of them are 
outright profiteers. They are exacting 20 per cent on their invest- 
ment. It cannot be kept up. Such profits arouse active competition 
and the rents drop. They are sure to drop, and sooner than many 
rent profiteers expect. 

Some years ago an apartment house could be built at $600 a 
room, but under the closed shop rules building trades ran up the 
costs to $1200 a room. The open shop plan will bring down such 
rates by honest competition and apartments will be looking for 
tenants unless the landlords drop their rates. 

As it is now, a four-room apartment in a nice part of the city is 
considered reasonable at $80 a month or $960 a year. But $960 
a year means that the tenant is paying 6 per cent on $16,000 for 
three rooms. How many people can afford to live in a $16,000 
house? An $8000 seven-room house is the limit of the average > 
buyer. The apartment house builders will have to pencil their ex- 
pectations of profiteering in rents, or they may regret their avari- 
cious intentions. 

Poster Fence Builders 

Some Market street property owners and apartment house profi- 
teers in rents have been opposing the Duboce street tunnel and the 
opening up of Sunset. 

One of the opponents is an upper Market street property owner, 
on one of whose many lots a well-known realty operator erected a 
hotel at a cost of $100,000. It proved to be a lamentable failure. 
To get out of paying ground rent the unlucky opera'or offered to 
turn over the building to the properly owner, who is very rich, 
having made a great deal of money during the war in powder 
stocks. 

"The hotel will revert to you, anyway, in fifteen years, under the 
ground lease," said the really man, "but cancel the lease now and 
I will turn you over my ownership in the building at once." 

It was so agreed. Two weeks later the realty operator received 
a bill for $25 from the rich property owner. 

"What's this for?" he asked. "I don't owe that man anything. 
I just gave him a hotel that cost me $100,000." 

"Oh, this bill is for sweeping out the cellar," answered the col- 
lector. 

The same property owner recen'ly pulled down a row of old flats 
on Market street to avoid paying taxes, and replaced the dilapi- 
dated buildings by a three-story poster fence, which will help to 
pay the taxes until some enterprising citizen comes along and raises 
property values by improving the adjoining property. 



BEAUTIFUL STUDY BY LATIMER 

H. P. Latimer has never painted anything better than his study 
of Fallen Leaf Lake, now on exhibition at Courvoisier's Art Store 
at 315 Sutter street. The view was from H. P. Blanchard's place 
on the shores of the lake near Fallen Leaf Lodge. The exquisite 
painting is replete with atmosphere and wonderful in colors. It is 
an ideal study of nature in one of her loveliest moods, with pine 
and cedar clustering on the banks of the matchless lake and re- 
flected in the blue of the water. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February II, 1922 




A Most Interesting 
Trip to the East 

is over the 

Sunset Route 

—through Los Angeles, 
Tucson, El Paso, San 
Antonio, Houston and 
New Orleans. 



TWO DAILY TRAINS FROM SAN FRANCISCO 
(Third Street Station) 

"Sunset Limited" Lv. 5:00 p.m. 

Ar. New Orleans 7:35 p.m. (3d Day) 

"Sunset Express" Lv. 8:15 p.m. 

Ar. New Orleans 6:25 p.m. (4th Day) 

CONNECTING WITH SOUTHERN PACIFIC OCEAN STEAM- 
ERS sailing weekly to New York ; also with daily trains to 
North and East. 

Rail and Steamer fare wame as All-Rail, but includes meals and 
bertha on steamers. "100 Golden Hours at Sea." 

On Your Way— See the 

APACHE TRAIL OF ARIZONA- 

By auto through the heart of "Apache Land" — a maze of 
canyons, peaks and cliffs aglow with bright colors — 120 
miles of scenic splendor. A one-day side trip or detour. 

DETOUR FROM MARICOPA through Phoenix. Roosevelt Dam 
and Globe to Bowie; OR SIDE TRIP FROM BOWIE VIA 
GLOBE to Boogevett Dam and return. Take Phoenix Sleeper, 
or Globe Sleeper, Sundays, Tuesdays and Fridays, from Los 
Angeles. 

Detour or Side Trip fare $20.00. 

iou can stop off at El Paso and go by street car into Old 
Mexico; or you can stop at New Orleans and visit many 
historic places. Mardi Gras festivities to Feb. 28th. 

For Railroad and Pullman Fares Ask Agents 

50 POST ST.— FERRY STATION— THIRD ST. STATION 
or Phone Sutter 4000 



Tricks of Art Fakirs 



OF the suspected "old masters" found in American homes, most 
come from New England and California, declares the New 
York Times. Occasionally an original of considerable value appears 
among ihem. These are the purchases made by earlier generations 
of Americans on trips abroad. 

Thirty or forty years ago it was notorious that many wealthy 
Americans had been victimized by crooked art dealers abroad. The 
situation is now changed, but the tradition persists in some parts of 
Europe that Americans are stupid people who will buy anything. It 
has been a saying that certain bogus things were not good enough 
for museums or European dealers, but were good enough for Amer- 
icans. 

The common trick of art fakirs was to go to an American with 
some money and no knowledge of art; to represent their paintings 
to him as a set of great masterpieces which had been stolen or 
smuggled into America, and to try to make him believe that he 
could buy them for a small fraction of their value and sell them 
for millions to wealthy collectors, if he ever should decide to part 
with his art treasures. Many rich New Englanders were thus led to 
buy, for large sums, pictures that were really worthless to con- 
noisseurs. 

California came next as a fine field for unscrupulous picture deal- 
ers. Millionaires, suddenly enriched, with wives eager to glitter in 
society, were numerous half a century ago. At that time many rich 
Californians returned from their travels in Europe with paintings of 
which only a small percentage had stood the tests of connoisseurs. 
"Busted" descendants have sometimes sold the family mansions and 
thrown the art treasures in gratis. The fire in 1906 caused a mighty 
swapping about of furnishings looted from doomed houses, and 
many canvasses and art objects found themselves in alien hands. 
Paintings which have had curious careers in California have found 
their way to New York looking for buyers. 

A well-known New York art dealer tells of a man who offered 
to sell him a collection of 100 masterpieces, after the great fire in 
San Francisco. The fellow said as he pulled out a list of his "old 
masters": 

"I have fine examples of all the great masters. I have ten Rem- 
brandts, eight Velasquezes, five Raphaels, three Holbeins — 

"That's enough," cried the dealer. "Get out of here!" 

There are more "old masters" on sale in Fifth Avenue art rooms 
than are on sale in all the rest of the world today. 

The paintings of real value occasionally discovered in American 
homes are genuine works of painters who were little thought of fifty 
years ago, but who have gained greatly in reputation since. What 
many weal hy collectors of forty or fifty years ago considered their 
second-rate and third-rate works have thus sometimes proved to be 
of substantial value. Once in a decade the possessor of the painting 
is astonished to learn that it's worth thirty times more than he had 
guessed. 

Another source of copies hawked about as possible old masters 
is the bargain hunting of American tourists, who do not understand 
the subject of art and who believe that fine things are to be picked 
up for a song in Europe at present. 

The truth is that art is about the only merchandise in which you 
cannot get bargains in Europe. In some countries art is the only 
thing of international value which they have. Selling it now would 
mean a loss because of the taxes and the currency situation. 



— Hiram Johnson answers San Francisco politicians who have 
resoluted against him that he is not, nor ever has been, opposed to 
disarmament. Senator Hiram ought to be too fly a bird to let any 
bunch of politicians get him "explaining." 



February 11, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



II 



Strike Cost Fourteen Millions 



THE recent garment workers' strike in New York, which left 
the workers no better off in wages or hours than before, cost 
them $4,000,000. There were no less than 10,000 "pickets" for 
whom carfare had to be paid, and that item alone amounted to 
$100 a day out of their union funds. But the workers find satis- 
faction in the thought that the strike cost the manufacturers $10,- 
000,000. The sum of $14,000,000 represents really what the strike 
will cost the public, to whom the costs of strikes are passed along 
in due time. 

But even though the public may be expected to foot the bills in 
the long run, the high cost of striking has kept so well apace with 
the high cost of everything else that it has begun to approach the 
prohibitive stage. Strikes are getting to be too expensive for the 
workers. 

The nine-week strike in the women's garment industry ended wi'.h 
the 55,000 employes returning to work under the same conditions 
that prevailed before the lockout. They resumed their tasks under 
the terms of an agreement which runs until next June. Meanwhile 
the Cloak, Suit and Skirt Manufacturers' Protective Association has 
served notice of its intention to contest the legality of that agree- 
ment in the courts. 

The $4,000,000 it cost the strikers to fight the manufacturers in- 
cludes a round $1,000,000 of actual expenses. The other $3,000,000 
is their estimate of what it cost the workers in terms of lost wages. 
The total cost to the manufacturers, based on the estimate of one 
of the best-informed members of that group, represents the loss of 
practically their total volume of business for a period of two 
months. 

Not the least part of the expense of running the strike was the 
rental of twenty-one halls and other meeting places where daily, 
throughout the period of their enforced idleness, the strikers met to 
hear their cause expounded by experienced speakers or by small 
groups of their own in earnest argument. The combined seating 
capacity of these halls was five times as great as the capacity of 
the huge auditoriums required for the purposes of the national con- 
ventions of the principal political parlies. The rent bill totaled 
something like $50,000. 



HOOVER'S COMMENT 

Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover, commenting on condi- 
tions in Europe in the current bulletin of the department, says that 
while economic recovery there is necessarily slow and difficult, and 
fraught with great dangers, it is not at all as gloomy as some state- 
ments would make it appear. 

"Year by year since the armistice the combatant states (except 
Russia) show steady gains in social and political stability," con- 
tinues the secretary. "They show great progress in recovery of 
agriculture, industry, foreign trade and communications. The one 
field of continuous degeneration is that of governmental finance: 
that is, the unbalanced budgets, the consequent currency inflation, 
etc., of certain countries, with its train of credit destruction. The 
commerce of the world obviously suffers." 



SEE NO GOOD IN COMMUNISM 

The newly formed organization of Paris shop girls will have none 
of Lenin or Trotzky. Bolshevism and communism have nothing in 
common with the fashionable Due de la Paix. These young women 
cannot see how anarchy is to advance the interests of fashionable 
or even unfashionable dressmaking establishments. 



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Established 1865 



Larkins 

Automobile 

Painting 



Buying a Larkins Paint Job is 

like buying good tires— you get 
more miles to the dollar. 

The durability of the Larkins 
Paint Job makes unnecessary 
the laying up of the car for paint- 
ing soon again. 

Both time and money are saved. 



Larkins & Co. 

First Avenue and Geary Street 
San Francisco 

Makers of the Larkins Top 

* 

* 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1922 




ociot 




Balls 

APPROXIMATELY 400 guests were en- 
tertained at a ball given by Mr. and 
Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling this week in honor 
of their ni;ce, Miss Eleanor Spreckels, one 
of this winter's debutantes. Numerous din- 
ner parties added to the evening's gayety. 

The decorative beauty of the classical 
Italian school of art adorned the two ball- 
rooms of the Hotel St. Francis, where the 
Jackling ball was held. As both of these 
two handsome rooms are of the architectural 
style that harmonizes with the ornate art of 
the Italian Renaissance, the effect was one 
of striking beauty. 

Tall, slender cypress trees, nature's equiv- 
alent of the Doric column, stood in the cor- 
ners and about the sides of the main ball- 
room, the trees apparently growing from 
handsome marble vases. The orchestra was 
hedged off behind green cypress, and similar 
hedges screened in the balcony. The con- 
trast of this dark color with the pale pastel 
hues of the ballroom was exceptionally ef- 
fective. 

The adjacent Italian ballroom, done in 
carved rosewood, contrasted beautifully with 
the other room. This room was done in vivid 
cerise, purple and rose colors, the bright 
hues in relief against the brownish woodsy 
tints of the room. 

In the center of the room stood a long 
buffet table, occupying most of the length 
of the room. This was covered with a bright 
rose-colored silk cloth, over which were 
placed carved marble vases holding Russell 
roses, purple and cerise hyacinths, with hand- 
some gold candelabra placed at intervals 
between. Small rose trees, their bases cov- 
ered with hyacinths, graced the mantel and 
fireplace. The fragrant flowers were massed 
together in such quantities that their per- 
fume scented the two rooms. 

Mrs. Jackling wore a Parisian gown of 
white georgette embroidered in rhinestones, 
with handsome pearl and diamond necklace, 
and other pieces of the same jeweled orna- 
ments elaborating the corsage. Her sister, 
Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, who, with Miss 
Spreckels, received the guests, also wore 
white, the gown being of tulle, embroidered 
in pearls. Miss Spreckels wore a Lucile 
dress of white tulle made in a buffant pan- 
nier style, bunches of French flowers orna- 
menting the gown. 

— Cards are out for the cotillion to be 
given at the Burlingame Country Club Sat- 
urday evening by a group of Burlingame 
people. It will be a large affair and Mrs. 
Richard McCreery is in charge of many of 
the arrangements. The cotillion will be led 
by Mr. Joseph Oliver Tobin and Mr. Percy 
King and they are planning some charming 
figures. 



— Mrs. Francesca Duenas gave a fancy 
dress party Sunday evening at her home in 
Clay street to celebrate the birthday of her 
daughter. Miss Edelmira Duenas. Everyone 
was in Spanish costume. 

— Final plans for the pageant that is to 
open the Mardi Gras ball at the Exposition 
Auditorium the evening of Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 28, were agreed upon at a meeting of 
the Mardi Gras committee Monday at Hotel 
St. Francis. More than 200 persons are to 
take part in the pageant. A general color 
scheme in costuming and decorating is to be 
followed, so that the spectacle will be har- 
monious as well as splendid. 

From now on the committee is to keep 
headquarters open daily at room 415 Hotel 
St. Francis. Votes for the Mardi Gras queen 
are to be received at that address, and all 
other details of the ball will be directed 
from there. The first nine candidates to be 
enrolled are: Mrs. Roger Lapham, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Parrott, Mrs. Cyril Tobin, Mrs. Alger- 
non Gibson, Mrs. Roy Bishop, Mrs. John 
Rosseter, Mrs. Earl Anthony, Miss Maud 
Fay, Miss Gertrude Hopkins. 
Busy Cupid 
— Cards will be sent out within a few 
days announcing the marriage of Miss 
Marion de Guerre to Parker Steward of Los 
Angeles, the ceremony having taken place 
in this city on January 30, at the Grace 
Cathedral, with Dean J. Wilmer Gresham 
officiating. The news of the marriage was 
a complete surprise to the many friends of 
the bride and even to relatives. She is a 
daughter of Mrs. I. E. de Guerre of this 
city. Steward is a Los Angeles man who 
has come to this city to be established in 
business. 

—Miss Kathryn Smith, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. James Smith, will be married to 
Morris Myers, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. 
Myers, of Courtland, Sacramento county, on 
February 15, at Rio Vista. Following the 
ceremony at the church there will be a 
large reception. Both families are prominent 
in the affairs of Sacramento county. 
Teas 
— Mrs. William Breeze gave a tea Sunday 
afternoon at her Green street home for 
some of the young officers of the U. S. S. 
Arizona. 

— Miss Helen Hawkins gave a delightful 
tea in Laurel court at the Fairmont Friday 
afternoon of last week. The party was given 
in Miss Lent's honor. At the conclusion of 
the tea Miss Lent's finance, Hermon Leon- 
ard Underhill of New York, who arrived a 
few days ago for the wedding, chanced to 
drop in. It was the first time that this 
coterie o/ Miss Lent's friends, most of them 
schoolmates, met the prospective bride- 
groom. 



— Miss Sara Deane entertained at a large 
tea at the Fairmont last week in honor of 
Miss Estelle Lakeman, who is visiting Col- 
onel and Mrs. Sydney Cloman at their home 
in Burlingame. Miss Lakeman is being ex- 
tensively entertained prior to her departure 
for Europe. 

— Mrs. Richard Costello gave a large tea 
in Palm court at the Palace Hotel last Sat- 
urday in honor of Miss Eileen Costello, who 
will be married to Adolph Canelo Jr. on 
February 1 4. 

— In honor of Miss Elvira Coburn, fiancee 
of Lawrence Jordon, Miss Katherine Mac- 
kail entertained at tea in Palm court at the 
Palace Hotel Tuesday afternoon. Miss Mac- 
kail and her parents are leaving in a week 
for Europe. 

Luncheons 

— Colonel and Mrs. Sydney V. Cloman 
gave a luncheon Sunday at the Burlingame 
Country Club for General Charles Morton, 
who recently arrived in San Francisco to 
take command of the Department of the 
West. 

— Mrs. Charles Butters gave a luncheon 
Tuesday at her home in Piedmont for Mrs. 
Frank Wright of New York. 

— Complimenting Mrs. Frederick Van 
Sicklen, the former Miss Ysbal Gilmore and 
a bride of the winter, and Miss Ola Willett, 
whose marriage to Lorin Tryon will be an 
event of this month, Mrs. Mervyn O'Neill 
entertained at a luncheon and bridge party 
Wednesday. 

— Mrs. William G. Henshaw will give a 
luncheon on Thursday, February 23, at her 
apartment at Stanford Court. The luncheon 
will be followed by an afternoon of bridge. 

— Mrs. Frances H. Davis, who makes her 
home at The Fairmont, gave the first of a 
series of luncheons in the Venetian room on 
Monday, complimenting Mrs. James Frances 
Dunn, who has closed her beautiful country 
home near Hollister and is spending the 
winter in San Francisco. 

— Mrs. Alfred Oyster and her sister-in- 
law, Miss Elizabeth Oyster, were hostesses 
at luncheon and bridge at the Francesca 
Club Tuesday. Twenty guests were asked 
to meet Miss Ola Willet, the guest of honor. 




oAll that the %ame 
Implies 



Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANflSCO 



February 11, 1922 

who is to be married to Lorin Howard 
Tryon on the 18th of this month. 
Bridge 
— Miss Sue Alston McDonald, the debu- 
tante daughter of Colonel and Mrs. John B. 
McDonald, is entertaining as her house 
guest Miss Erna McDonald of New York, 
who will remain in California indefinitely. 
Miss McDonald had a few of her friends 
at bridge and tea at her home at Alcatraz 
Monday to meet the attractive visitor. 

— Mrs. Romolo Sbarboro entertained on 
Monday at the first of a series of bridge teas 
at her home. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Allan Cline held the 
initial meeting of their neighborhood bridge 
club last Saturday evening, when they en- 
tertained at their new home in Filbert street. 
Four tables were held. 

— Mrs. William B. Ireland entertained in- 
formally at bridge and tea at the Francesca 
Club Tuesday in honor of Mrs. Earl Ed- 
wardes R. Jones, who prior to her marriage 
was Miss Julita Galpin. 
Dinners 

— Dr. and Mrs. William Everett Musgrave, 
who were married in October of last year, 
were the honored guests at a handsome din- 
ner given by Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst 
at the Fairmont on Sunday evening. Mrs. 
Musgrave was the former Mrs. Albert A. 
Moore Jr., who has been a favorite in so- 
ciety on both sides of the bay. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Robert Irving Bentley 
were hosts at a dinner-dance in the Rose 
room at the Palace Hotel Monday evening, 
at which Miss Ruth Lent and her fiance, 
Hermon Leonard Underhill, were the com- 
plimented guests. 

— Commodore and Mrs. James B. Bull 
were hosts at a dinner party Tuesday even- 
ing at their home in Jackson street. 

— Mrs. Harry D. Johnson and her niece, 
Miss Charlotte Ziele of San Rafael, were 
hosts at a delightful dinner-dance Saturday, 
when they entertained in compliment to 
Miss Gertrude Minton and Nicholas Kittle 
Boyd, whose marriage will be an event of 
the spring. 



The new lenses 



designated as "Colonial" rimless lenses 
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AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 

In Town and Out 

—Mr. and Mrs. Horace Pillsbury and 
their daughter returned Sunday from New 
York and are at their home in Pacific ave- 
nue, where their eldest daughter, Mrs. Alfred 
de Ropp, and Mr. de Ropp, arrived from 
the East a fortnight ago. 

— Mrs. Bertha Ralston Bright and her 
daughter, Miss Mildred Bright, have arrived 
from New York and have taken an apart- 
ment at Stanford Court for six months. Mrs. 
Bright is a niece of Mrs. Arthur Page and a 
relative of the Mailliards. 

— Mr. William Miller Graham has arrived 
from Oklahoma and is being greeted by his 
friends here and down the peninsula. 

— Dr. and Mrs. George Willcut left Mon- 
day for San Diego, where they will visit Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Sefton for a fortnight. 

—Mrs. Frank Wright of New York, a 
cousin of Mrs. James King Steele, has been 
visiting here for the last two weeks en route 
from Southern California to the other coast. 
She has been much entertained during her 
stay here. 

—Mr. and Mrs. B. P. Oliver sailed on 
the Empire State Tuesday. They will tour 
the Orient. 

—Mr. Delphin M. Delmas and his daugh- 
ter, Miss Antoinette Delmas, have arrived 
from their home in Santa Monica, and are 
at the Hotel Cecil. It is their first visit to 
their former home in a number of years, 
and they are being greeted by many of their 
old friends. 

— Mr. Francis Carolan and Mr. Gordon 
Armsby sailed Wednesday for Honolulu, 
where they will spend several weeks, and 
will then proceed to the Orient. 

— The Misses Vere de Vere, Ernestine 
and Schatze Adams, daughters of Mrs. 
Adolph Uhl of Oakland, left Monday for 
New York, from .whence they will sail for 
Europe in the near future. They expect to 
spend a year in travel abroad and will be 
joined later in the year by Mr. and Mrs. Uhl. 

Intimations 

— Mrs. Charles H. Hopkins, who left here 
for New York in December, will sail for 
Europe April 1 I on the Aquitania. She is 
now visiting relatives at Lakewood, N. J. 

— Mr. Robert Hays Smith is receiving the 
sympathy of his friends for the death of his 
mother, which occurred a few days ago in 
Philadelphia. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Paul Thayer Iaccaci, who 
were married in New York last month, and 
are spending iheir honeymoon here, will 
return to the East in a fortnight. Mrs. 
Iaccaci was Mrs. Elkins de Guigne. 

— Tallant Tubbs, who is confined to his 
rooms at Dante Sanatorium because of in- 
juries suffered in a recent automobile acci- 
dent, is recovering and expects to return to 
his home in another week. His condition 
was not so serious as was feared. 

— Among the many San Franciscans plan- 
ning European trips are Mrs. E'hyl Hager 
and Mis. Joseph Oliver Tobin. They expect 
to leave next month and will join Mrs. 
Tobin's sisters. Mrs. Ferdinand Thieriot and 
Mrs. George Cameron, in Paris, 



13 



— Sympathy is being extended to Mrs. 
William Mayo Newhall Jr. on the death of 
her mother, Mrs. William Smith O'Brien, in 
this city. 

Notes from Del Monte 

— Eric Pedley, who is acting as captain 
of the Del Monte polo team during the ill- 
ness of Hugh Drury, was host at a dinner- 
dance Saturday evening in the Palm Grill 
at the Hotel Del Monte to celebrate the 
winning of the senior cups in the polo tourn- 
ament. Among the guests were Mr. and Mrs. 
James Schewan, Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Tobin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vincent, Mr. and 
Mrs. Byington Ford, Mr. and Mrs. Francis 
McComas. 

— George Wright, perhaps one of the 
greatest all-round athletes of America, is 
paying Del Monte a visit to get in some 
golf licks over the historic links of the Del 
Monte course, and the seaside links at Peb- 
ble Beach. Wright celebrated his seventy- 
sixth anniversary of his birthday this week, 
but is still an active man, who finds no 
trouble getting in eighteen holes of play 
during a day. 

—Mr. Richard M. Tobin entertained Lord 
and Lady Rodney of England and Mr. Field 
of Santa Barbara at a dinner at the Del 
Monte Lodge. 



The station master, hearing a crash on the 
platform, ran out of his room just in time 
to see the express disappearing around the 
curve and a disheveled young man sprawled 
amid several overturned milk cans and the 
contents of his traveling bag. 

"Was he trying to catch the train?" asked 
the station master of a small boy who stood 
by admiring the scene. 

"He did catch it," said the boy, happily, 
"but it got away again." — Chicago Herald 
and Examiner. 



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chine. Work guaranteed. 

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Phone Douglas 5232 
Oakland, BoltC 194, I irsf Natl. Bank Bid* 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

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lit City Booking Office 
4(11 Crocker Building 

Telephone Minor 6130 
I'nder Management CARL S. STAN'LEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

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PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

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JEWELS In Tlatinum 

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EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 





1|1NANCIA1^ 




By P. N. BERINGER 



AVERY GENERAL feeling is prevalent 
amcng business men that at last we 
are really ft eling the advance wavelet of 
prosperity. Certainly, all business for the 
past month has reflected that idea, except 
foreign Irade. Now foreign trade is begin- 
ning to 'ook up brighter. The month of 
January, however, shows a decline over the 
amount of shipping tonnage handled at this 
port for the month of December. A better 
way to arrive at what business is really do- 
ing would be to learn the tonnage value of 
the shipments carried. Unfortunately, these 

figures are not yet at hand. 
* # # 

The improved feeling among men of busi- 
ness, in all callings, is said to be due to the 
good work accomplished by the arms con- 
ference. The peace effected in Ireland has 
added to the confidence displayed and the 
progress being made along economic lines is 
another factor. 

The reduction in freight rates, to take ef- 
fect in a month, made by the Santa Fe and 
the Southern Pacific Company, will have the 
effect of aiding those who are in the can- 
ning business and in the manufacture of 
ether California products. 

Retail business in San Francisco may be 
said to be fair to middling. Wholesale busi- 
ness is just fair. 

Industrial stocks are in demand and, in 
fact, all stocks and bonds of a standard 
quality are showing an upward tendency. 

The value of the club in business life is 
not to be overestimated. Reference isn't 
made to the stuffed club or anything of that 
kind, but to the various get-together meet- 
ings of business men which take place in 
the different hotel dining rooms of the city 
each week. At these meetings there is a 
growing habit of an interchange of views. 
To be sure, a great deal of what is said is 
purely piffle, but it is doubtful if the habit 
of telling strictly nothing but the truth 
would lead to better results. The business 
man knows just how much discount his 
neighbor's talk will stand, and he accepts 
the ornamental part or "bunk" as beautiful 
but not necessary. These clubs serve a very 
beneficial purpose, and are of the greatest 
aid in creating a community spirit. 

^ if. %. 

The Bay counties are destined to see a 
building boom this year. At this time there 
is considerable unemployment. In Oakland 
2000 men are without jobs and are being 
cared for through charities and entertain- 



men's given for their benefit. These men 
are, for the most part, not skilled workers. 
San Francisco must possess double the num- 
ber out of employment. Why not begin 
building just a little earlier and put all of 
these men at work clearing ground and dig- 
ging foundations? In the downtown district 
a large number of lots are covered over with 
debris still left over from the big fire and 
an accumulation of cans, boilers, boxes and 
other refuse. Couldn't the city employ these 
unemployed in clearing these lots, carting 
off the unburnable debris and burning the 
rest? 

We have had a great deal to say in the 
past about municipal ownership and the 
various failures attending experiments in 
that line. This time we wish to remark that, 
after a very painstaking survey, Chicago 
aldermen have made a report which caused 
the closing of Chicago's widely advertised 
$2,700,000 municipal repair shops. The 
committee of aldermen reported that city 
work done there has cost "300 per cent of 
what it would have cost" if done in com- 
mercial shops. Which leaves us in the air, 
as we do not know exactly what is meant 
by the quotation as to costs. The fact re- 
mains, however, that the shops are closed as 
a "failure." 

Shipping — The many changes made in 
rail and steamship local office managements 
are reflected in a greatly improved service 
bv the various companies making the 
changes. There is more pep, more attention 
to business, and a great deal more efficiency 
displayed by the men who have left one 
office to take another under a different em- 
ploying corporation. Most of these men are 
bent on making records with the new em- 
ployer, and some are naturally trying to 
show the old employer just how much he 
has lost. 

The Luckenbach people have certainly 
drawn a prize when they got H. C. Can- 
telow. He was formerly traffic manager of 
the Pacific Steamship Company, and he is 
now Pacific Coast manager for the Lucken- 
bach Lines. Few men in shipping circles 
have his clear perception of affairs and his 
knowledge of ocean commerce is second to 
none. He is surrounding himself with men 
who are in touch with every angle of the 
traffic situation in San Francisco, and the 
selection of Zach George as his assistant will 
have the endorsement of the business world. 

Mr. Hammond, whom Cantelow succeeded 
with the Luckenbachs, is now the manager 



February 11. 1922 

for the Atlantic, Gulf & Pacific. He brings 
to his present employer a wealth of informa- 
tion and a vast practical knowledge of sea 

transportation affairs. 

* * * 

Insurance — The Equitable Life Insurance 
Company, it is reported, will discontinue 
writing personal health and accident insur- 
ance the last day of the month of February. 
Business in insurance circles is reported by 
nearly every agency called upon as being 
much improved since the first of the year. 
J. B. Levison of the Firemans Fund is now 
the president of the Insurance Federation of 

California. 

* * * 

In General — Let us look around. It now 
is certain that 1921 was a fairly good year 
with the bankers, as the balance sheets all 
show profits. It is granted, of course, these 
profits are not so large as they were in 
previous years. There is a very apparent 
improvement in all gilt-edged stocks. Bonds 
are holding their own and improving. It 
may be said that the banks are holding a 
stronger position than at any time since the 
armistice contract was signed. Prices have 
fallen, of course. That means cheaper raw 
materials for the manufacturers. Interest 
rates are lower. The commercial man may 
go ahead with greater confidence. The ex- 
port trade in America has been improved 
through the rise in sterling. Wages and sal- 
aries are somewhat lower; building material 
costs have come down to some extent, and 
all of the foregoing goes to show that the 
world of trade has been purged of many 
impurities. We are not going to have a 
boom year in 1922. but there is certainly 
going to be a very great improvement over 

the year 1921. 

# * * 

Industrial California — California is in the 
position of being, as far as the world is con- 
cerned, a sort of outpost representative of 
the industrial Eastern states of this country. 
Nobody realizes that quite as much as the 
solicitor for advertisements from firms doing 
business on this Coast as factory representa- 
tives. Imagine a great majority of such 
firms having to refer export orders to the 
home office, having no authority whatever 
to contract for publicity; some qf them 
haven't the authority to pay the rent of the 
premises they occupy. And yet these firms 
handle, for domestic consumption, a vast 
variety and quantity of merchandise and 
machinery. Is there any good reason why 
California should not produce this merchan- 
dise and this machinery and thus eliminate, 
as far as it is possible, any dependence on 

the Eastern states and their factories? 

* * * 

California manufactures a great many 
commodities; she is strong in the manufac- 
ture of foodstuffs, she makes certain lines 
of machinery that are made nowhere else, 
her raw material production is great. Yet, 
in every industrial line, her output might be 
intensified and increased a hundred fold. 
The trouble is that we are not "industrially- 
minded," just as we are not "ship-minded," 
and we do not give, through our financial 



February II. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



houses and through private means, encour- 
agement through investment. We have every- 
thing necessary to establish ourselves as the 
great industrial state of the West, and we 
either do not use the opportunity to our 
advantage or we waste it. 

Hydro-electric power can be developed to 
any extent that may be desired. We possess 
great plants. One of these is probably the 
most perfect in the country, or any country; 
but did we turn our attentions to industrial 
development we could use five times the 
power now at hand. We repeat what we 
have said so many times before: Every en- 
couragement should be given to those who 
would develop electric power, and electric 
power may only be developed through the 
further development of the immense poten- 
tial strength now stored in our mountain 
streams. Hydro-electric power has reached 
the stage in its development in California 
only through the unhampered expression of 
the initiative and the energy of private cor- 
porations, headed by individuals with suffi- 
cient vision to "take a chance." Every effort 
to strangle the fullest future development, 
by controlling the development and the pro- 
duction of hydro-electric power, through 
control by a state committee or board with 
czar-like powers, should be frowned upon 
by all, because the establishment of such a 
board of control, or such a committee, sim- 
ply means the slowing down of our indus- 
trial development. California manufacturing 
enterprises, present and future, need no 
sedatives. What is needed is every variety 
of stimulant. 



Landlord — "You didn't pay the rent for 
last month." 

Tenant — "No? Well, I suppose you'll hold 
me to your agreement." 

"Agreement! What agreement?" 

"Why, when I rented you said I must pay 
in advance or not at all." — Detroit Free 
Press. 



Money in Grain 

|1S.B0 buys guaranteed option on 10,000 bushels 
of wheat or corn. No further rink. A movement 
of Be from price gives you an opportunity to 
take 1600; 4c, MOO; 8c $300. etc. Write for 
particulars and tree market letter. 

INVESTORS* DAILY QUIDS 

Bouthwesl Branch, Desk CO) 1001 Baltimore Ave, 

K;iti-,i- City, Mn. 



Cummunity Homes 

SPLENDID BUILDINGS on RUSSIAN 
HILL UNION TERRACE — Nearlng 
completion; marine view; oourts and 
fountains Separate entrances. GAPQ Dl 
MONTI V structure ; plane to 

suit buyers. Ground] will be broken at 
once. This EVOLUTION in HOICKS 00m- 
btnes more oonvenlanosa, mora comforts. 

lit lower prices, less upfe 

W. F.CHIPM AN, 625 Market St. 




vwmt 



The Pacific Auto Show 

THE sixth annual Pacific Automobile 
Show will open this Saturday noon at 
the Exposition Auditorium. 

At this time motor men from all parts of 
the West will gather for their annual con- 
ferences in San Francisco and will look over 
the various new models being offered by the 
Eastern factories. 

For the automobile man, the show this 
year will have a greater value than any dis- 
play in recent years because the new models, 
the new prices and the general unsettled 
condition that has prevailed in the trade for 
some time past, has left the automobile ex- 
pert almost as much in the dark as to the 
present motor car values as it has the be- 
wildered buying public. 

The motorist will also find greater interest 
in the auto show this year for a number of 
reasons. First, because of the large number 
of new cars and new models that will be 
shown, and second, because the display will 
bring home to him the amazing fact of how 
"much more automobile" can be bought for 
the money this year. 



More Caution 
A little more of the caution of our fore- 
fathers in the present generation of auto- 
mobile drivers would tend to improve the 
current careless habits of many motorists. It 
would also tend to lessen the frequency with 
which folks in the automotive world take 
chances. 



Road Building Goes On 
One would not expect the month of De- 
cember, with its storms, to be a banner 
period for road building, yet during that 
time there were completed 1153 miles of 
Federal highways under the supervision of 
the Bureau of Public Roads, United States 
Department of Agriculture. 



All Can Be Beau ified 
No automobile, if its mechanical parts are 
intact, however badly damaged, is beyond 
the state of repair, according to Allan Lar- 
kins of Larkins & Company. 



cars could be sold. The number of motor 
cars has increased nearly seven times in the 
past eight years in the United States, and 
has trebled in the last five years. 



Auto Registrations Promising 

One of the most promising signs of the 
times, according to Lou H. Rose, Maxwell 
and Chalmers distributor, is the number of 
automobile registrations for 1922 that are 
being received this year by the State Motor 
Vehicle Department at Sacramento. 



"Madam, when you say your car was out 
of control and headed toward the sidewalk, 
why didn't you do something?" 

"I did do something," said the matron, 
indignantly. 

"What?" 

"I screamed." — Birmingham Age-Herald. 



These Medievalists — McGowan: "I wish 
Savonarola had been a Spaniard." 

Nolan -"Why?" 

"Well, that's what I said he was on my 
examination paper." — Detroit Varsity News. 



Authorized Simonizing Stations 




Painting and Upholstering Di 
m. -nt will in- pleased to fumlf 
on any work. 

if YMiir offi.-.- or home turn 
. t i'i 1 1 or dingy, send tor ■ Slmontser. 

California Simonizing Co. 

lata California Street IMI Broadway 

Baa Krntiii.il> O aklan d 

Ph, Pi Ph. Oaklan 



No Such Thing as Saturation 
Thousands of new car owners will swell 
the parade to the mountains and to the sea- 
shore with the coming of summer months. 
There are 10.500.000 motor cars in the 
United States at the present time, according 
to available statistics, and as long ago as 
1911 people were talking about the "satu- 
ration point" when every person financially 
able to own a car owned one. and when 
there could be no new buyers to whom new 



Beat E qui pped unit Host MODERN 
(,.\H\(.r: Weal «t CTilfngo 

The Century 



Two Hlork- from I nion Squarf 

i.rr. Post sn-'i Ban Fnou Uh <». I - » I « f - 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February II, 1922 




PlyE/ASURD'S WAND 



The Orpheum's Activities 

There is one element absolutely necessary 
to the enjoyment of the vaudeville fan, and 
that is action. With its usual accuracy the 
Orpheum management has discovered this, 
and the current program is one of exhilarat- 
ing activity from start to finish. The Four 
Marx Brothers in their new act, "On the 
Balcony," have brought with them some 
lovely ladies this time and a lot of new 
music and dances and fun. The "Lyrical 
Raconteuse," Lydia Barry, fulfills the prom- 
ise of that alluring title and creates wide- 
spread amusement. Other mirthful little 
sketches are "Listen, Bertie," and "Who Is 
Your Boss?" Innes Brothers have compiled 
a lot of cheery nonsense in their act, "Men 
About Town." Three Spanish dancers sup- 
ply a beautiful bit of graceful dancing and 
melodious music untouched by jazz. The 
Garcincetti Brothers and their clever dog, in 
a hat-throwing novelty, complete a rich bill. 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

which she plays with extraordinary skill. 
Frederick Green, her husband in the play, 
gives the impression I hat he could do a 
great deal more than the playwright asks of 
him. Ned Doyle is fast becoming a favorite 
at the Alcazar, and Charles Yule is, of 
course, quite established in our esteem. Ben 
Erway never fails to make good. 




Columbia 

Fortunately another week is allowed in 
which to see Terry Duffy in "Wait Till 
We're Married," a comedy of considerable 
merit, well acted by the popular ^tar and an 
excellent supporting company. This is the 
class of play that Columbia audiences ap- 
preciate, as evidenced by their large attend- 
ance. Next week comes a London "Revue." 
Harry Tate, a clever English comedian, and 
a large chorus of beautiful English girls will 
make this production a distinctive one, and 
"The London Follies" is anticipated with 
keen interest. 



Fashionable Fun at Alcazar 

"Scrambled Wives" is certainly most mod- 
ern, to both the eye and the ear. The ladies 
all wear the very latest and smartest clothes, 
and the lines of the play echo the "derner 
cri" from New York society. The plot is of 
a complicity that gives Dudley Ayres (as 
John Chiverick) two wives, one an "ex" 
(beautiful Grace George) and the other 
(Emily Pinter) an emphatically present 
mate, exuberantly in love wi'h her hand- 
some husband and tortured by an unreason- 
ing jealousy of his divorced wife. Imagine, 
then, the consternation when they all find 
themselves house guests at a friend's home 
in the Thousand Islands! Miss Pinter's re- 
turn, after nearly a year's absence, to the 
Alcazar, is an agreeable event. The re- 
appearance also of Gladys Emmons is a 
great pleasure to those who enjoy clearness 
of enunciation, modulation of voice, and 
grace of gesture in an actress. Anne Berry- 
man will always be able to play vivacious 
young girl parts in a satisfactory manner. 
Anna MacNaughtan, that gracious and 
capable, sympathetic and reliable friend of 
us all, has in this play an ordinary part 



The Players 

The monthly "primiere" at the Players 
Club has become one of the important and 
interesting dramatic events of San Fran- 
cisco. One finds oneself in an audience com- 
posed of the people who know. It is a 
pleasant feeling to be among them. And the 
performance is invariably excellent. This 
month the program is made up of three 
short plays; the first is Ben Purrington's 
adaptation of Eugene Sue's "Charles the 
Simple" and gives a glimpse into the melan- 
choly life of that unhappy monarch. The 
second play is a clever bit of comedy called 
"Fourteen" and depicts the amusing anxie- 
ties of a modern hostess about to give a 
dinner party. "Exiles" is Dan Totheroh's 
intense and pictureful tragedy of the South 
Seas, and in its effect upon the audience 
reminded one of a Dunsany play. The work 
of this young playwright compels the 
attention of the thoughtful critic. It has 
qualities to which may be applied that great 
big word, Genius. 



Imperial 

"Saturday Night" is in its second week 
and still drawing excellent houses. An inter- 
esting mixture of drama and comedy is this 
De Mille production, being this director's 
latest attempt at lifting the curtain upon im- 
possible domestic situations. Thrills abound, 
the settings are among the best seen in any 
movie film, and the characters well chosen. 

Saslavsky has a more entertaining pro- 
gram than usual. Short scenics fill in a good 
bill. 



Good Things at California 

Sir Gilbert Parker has been responsible 
for a number of departures in the film realm, 
among the best being this week's offering, 
"The Lane That Had No Turning." With 
Canadian traditions as a background, he has 
modeled a good study of human experiences 
which the directors have ably transferred to 
the screen. Agnes Ayres and Theo. Kosloff 
enter into the spirit of Parker's play with 
fidelity, and the whole production is made 
to depend upon their individual efforts rather 
than elaborate settings and emotion. 

It is a pleasure to recommend something 
genuine. The management, by presenting 
Senorita Juanita Arenas and Senor Arturo 
de la Plaza, Argentine dancers, won the 



gratitude of the audience, and it is hoped 
more will be seen of them. 

Heller and his orchestra are excellent and 
the fill-ins are acceptable. 



Granada 

While it is rather unfair to compare stage 
with film productions, "The Law and the 
Woman" loses nothing when placed beside 
the spoken version. Betty Compson essays 
a new role, one heavier than anything she 
has previously done. She does admirably 
and is backed up by good support. 

Cleo Ridgely reappears as a movie 
"vamp" and seems to have lost none of her 
eld fascination. 

The Granada management continues to be 
most generous in its assortment of "units." 
Short films, plenty of music, both of the 
jazz and better variety, liven up the enter- 
tainment. 



John A. Britton Singled Out for Lecture 

John A. Britton, vice-president and general 
manager of the Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company, has been selected by Princeton 
University to deliver a lecture at the Uni- 
versity on April 4 on the subject of "Pacific 
Coast Public Utility Development." 

Mr. Britton enjoys the distinction of be- 
ing singled out from the men of our Western 
land to take part in a series of lectures pro- 
vided for by the Cyrus Foff Brackett foun- 
dation, and will make the trip to Princeton 
especially for that purose. 

The lecture will deal largely with the en- 
gineering features of electric power genera- 
tion, both steam and hydraulic, and will 
describe the leading characteristics of the 
high tension transmission and interconnect- 
ing systems in California. Combined with 
engineering details will be the romantic 
story of the development of hydro-electric 
power plants in California through the 
agency of the old-time reservoir and ditches 
that were used in hydraulic mining during 
pioneer days. Mr. Britton proposes, also, 
under the broad subject of public utility 



SAMfRAMOSCO 



W VAv>Dt«U* 




i 



,2 &\y»K\ttw&\auX A >> " 

MA ™f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



February II, 1922 

development, to discuss the generation and 
distribution of gas. 



Orpheum's Coming Bill 

Dave Harris, who plays innumerable in- 
struments and who sings as well, will be a 
headliner at the Orpheum next week. He 
brings seven young fellows with him. Ben 
Bernie will appear on next week's bill. He 
used to be an eccentric violinist, but has 
broadened his comedy. Ward Brothers will ' 
present their skit as "Bertie" and "Archie" 
in "Penny Ante." Bobby Adams and Jewel 
Barnett will offer songs at the piano. Emil 
Pallenberg will exhibit his wonderful trained 
bears, which skate and rope-walk. Emile 
and John Nathane will do astonishing gym- 
nastic stunts in evening dress. The Four 
Marx Brothers will play another week. 



Alcazar's Next Bill 

"Cornered," the principal characterization 
in which is a dual role, will be the Alcazar's 
attraction beginning Sunday matinee, Feb- 
ruary 12. It is a detective comedy-drama, 
unique in construction, and the leading part 
will be in the hands of Gladys George, who 
will be seen in a Doctor Jeckyll and Mr. 
Hyde role. Dudley Ayres will be seen in the 
leading male characterization, and the Alca- 
zar will introduce Brady Kline, who will be 
favorably remembered by patrons of this 
theater as having been a popular member 
of the company up to two years ago. Kline 
comes here to assume "heavy" roles. 



John Cowper Powys to Talk at Maitland 

John Cowper Powys, distinguished poet, 
essayist and novelist, who has returned to 
San Francisco after an extensive lecture 
tour in the Eastern and Southern states, will 
begin this week a series of lectures on con- 
temporary literature, under the management 
of Jessica Colbert. His lecture will be given 
in the Maitland Theater on Tuesday and 
Friday mornings at 1 1 o'clock, beginning on 
February 10. Among the topics he will dis- 
cuss is "Books That Live and Die," which 
will include "Moby Dick," "The Song of the 
Lark," "The . Briary Bush," "The Voyage 
Out," "If Winter Comes," "Privilege," "The 
Black Diamond." 



MODERN JAPANESE PAINTINGS 

In co-operation with the Japan Society of 
America, the San Francisco Museum of Art 
will open in the Palace of Fine Arts Friday 
afternoon, February 24, with a private view 
and reception, an exhibition of modern Jap- 
anese paintings by members of Nippon 
Bijutsu-in of Tokyo, which is the name of 
a group of Japan's foremost artists working 
in the traditional classic style, who have 
banded together to conserve and develop the 
national art of Japan. This is the first ex- 
hibition of this group to be shown outside 
of Japan, and San Francisco will be the 
only point west of Cleveland fortunate 
enough to see this very remarkable collec- 
tion. 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 

CONSERVING THE WILD FLOWERS 

The California Wild Flower Conservation 
League has inaugurated a brisk campaign 
for the protection of certain native plants 
and flowers that are threatened with almost 
complete extermination. 

The hordes of automobilists and careless 
hikers are becoming notorious for their de- 
structiveness in mutilating shrubbery and 
trees, tearing and uprooting the wild flowers 
and ferns, and carrying them away by the 
armsful, only to toss them aside as they 
fade. Education along these lines is needed. 

According to Mrs. Bertha M. Rice, head 
of the Wild Flower Conservation League, 
they will endeavor to get a bill before the 
next Legislature to prevent the commerciali- 
zation and destruction of certain beautiful 
wild flowers and plants that are rapidly 
diminishing in many localities through rough 
treatment. Schools, clubs and other organi- 
zations are being interested in this move- 
ment. 



17 



BRILLIANT THRONG GATHER AFTER 
THEATER AT TECHAU TAVERN 

The after-the-theater suppers at Techau 
Tavern are striking an unusually responsive 
cord in the hearts of San Franciscans of 
late. The delightful refreshments served, the 
unique entertainment of a high class nature 
provided, combined with the luxurious and 
informal atmosphere, serve to make the fin- 
ishing hours of the evening extremely pleas- 
urable when spent at Techau Tavern. Espe- 
cially popular are the evenings when "ama- 
teurs" are featured. These evenings, which 
occur on Tuesdays and Fridays, are a re- 
minder of the good old days with their 
bouyant hilarity, humor and fun. Amateurs 
from everywhere take part in many num- 
bers, comic and laugh-provoking. Lucky 
dances are a phase of every night's enter- 
tainment. The winners receive prizes of 
Melachrino cigarettes and Gruenhagen's 
chocolates. 



LUNCHEON AT THE FAIRMONT 

The 75-cent luncheon at the Fairmont 
attracts many business men, who desire to 
withdraw for half an hour from the whirl 
of the life of busy men of trade and finance 
and the professions. The service is always 
perfect at the Fairmont, and the menu in- 
comparable. To enjoy it once is to make it 
part of the daily life. 



"Who was the poet who wrote about 
man's inhumanity to man'?" asked Mr. Bib- 
bles, in a choking voice. 

"I don't recall," said Mr. Jagsby. "What 
reminded you of that quotation?" 

"I've just discovered that I paid $10 for 
a quart of cold tea." — Birmingham Age- 
Herald. 



WORLD'S ART FRATERNITY AT SALON 

A salon of the World's Art Fraternity, 
which was attended by more than two hun- 
dred of the most prominent people in local 
society, was held in the Gold room of the 
Fairmont on Wednesday afternoon. Haig 
Patigian made an address on "International 
Art," and spoke of the absence in San 
Francisco of a local art committee to stimu- 
late art and aid in establishing a high stand- 
ard in the beautification of the city. Ours 
is the largest city not possessing a recog- 
nized art committee. Many very smart gowns 
were seen at the salon, which was very ar- 
tistic and beautiful. 



"Play poker with a bunch of women?" 
"No, I can't take their money." 
"Don't worry. You won't." — Louisville 
Courier-Journal. 



g>an jFratuiarn (Eljrattrl? 

[leading Newspaper «t the Pacific Const 

A Newspaper made every day 

To BPEAH in 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Dally ami Sunday Chronicle, delivered for St. 15 a month- 
Including Bundaji editions 

Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postnueter 



la POWELL s*t. 

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Opporiie 0rf4euv TLu&rc 

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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11. 1922 



He — "Think twice before you refuse me." 
She — "Why should 1 think twice?" 
He — "Because women never think twice 
the same." — New York Sun. 



"What's the argument between the scien- 
tists?" "Aw, there's no meat to it." "I see. 
Just a bone of contention." — Louisville 
Courier-Journal. 



"Did you hear about the awful trouble 
that has befallen Mrs. Talbot?" "Don't tell 
me she has lost her voice." "No, her hus- 
band has lost his hearing." — Boston Tran- 
script. 



Doctor — "That's purely imagination. Just 
convince yourself that you're cured and you 
won't be sick any more." 

Patient — "If that's the case, doctor, con- 
sider yourself as being paid." — Paris Le 
Journal Amusant. 



Lieutenant (roaring with rage at steward) 
— "Who told you to put those flowers on the 
table?" 

Steward — "The commander, sir." 
Lieutenant — "Pretty, aren't they?" — Okla- 
homa Sea Bag. 



He — "What is the matter? You haven't 
said a word in the last twenty minutes." 

She — "I never speak when I have not 
anything to say." 

He — "Be my wife, will you?" — Amherst 
Lord Jeff. 



"Yes, Algy, we can be married. Father 
says he will trust me to you." "Think he 
would endorse my note for 200 plunkets?" 
"No, I don't think he would trust you to 
that extent, Algy." — Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 



"Mr. Stude," said the landlady, "I must 
object to your sitting in your room with 
your feet on the table." "Sorry," said Mr. 
Stude, "but my room-mate's were on the 
floor." — Michigan Gargoyle. 



"Do you think I shall live until I'm 90, 
doctor?" 

"How old are you now?" 

"Forty." 

"Do you drink, gamble, smoke, or have 
you any vices of any kind?" 

"No. I don't drink, I never gamble, I 
loathe smoking; in fact, I haven't any 
vices." 

"Well, good heavens, what do you want 
to live another fifty years for?" — London 
Mail. 



Teacher — "Willie, can you tell me how 
matches are made?" 

Little Willie : — "No, ma'am, but I don't 
blame you for wanting to find out." 

"Why, what do you mean?" 

"Mother says you have been trying to 
make one for years." — Detroit News. 



"What has become of the old highway- 
man who used to say, 'Your money or your 
life'?" 

"He has gone to bootleggin'," answered 
Uncle Bill Bottletop, "and now demands 
both." — Washington Star. 



Mrs. A. — "I have such a job getting my 
husband awake in the morning." 

Mrs. B. — "Same with me. I only wish 
John could be aroused as easily as his suspi- 
cions are." — Boston Globe. 



"What have you learned at school?" was 
the time-honored question a young woman 
asked her niece yesterday. 

"Oh, nothing at all," responded the little 
first-grader; "I don't know what in the 
world is the matter with my teacher I" — 
Eldorado (Kan.) Times. 



He — "Great heavens, woman ! Do you But They Carry Mortgages — "Even the 

think I am made of money?" poor no longer carry bundles." 

She — "I wish you were. I could get you "Of course not! They take them right in 

changed then." — Boston Transcript. their autos." 



A 

* JOHN" LACOSTE HENRY SAXL H. B. GUERNSEY ARTHUR F. PRICK 

President Supt. and Chemist Analyst and Snll Expert Consorting ( henilst 

PIERRE BAREILLES, Secretary-Treasurer 



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California Fertilizer Works 

Manufacturers of 

Complete Fertilizers 
Bone Meal, Etc. 

4 44 PINE STREET 

CALIFORNIA MARKET KLDG. 



Phone Douglas 8745 



Branch Office: 216 Grosse Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



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BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

LUNCHEON 75c 
Served Daily — 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large 

menu, which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beuotiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

FRENCH DINNER $1.50 

Including tax, week days and Sundays, 

5 to 9 p. m. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH STREET, ABOVE KEARNY 

Phone: Douglas 3411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 
C5 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Plume Kearny 4536 Sun Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. LeidcsdoriT 



Quality 1866--56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

< >ur .Service Includes Following Places: 

IturlinKame Redwood City Menlo Turk 

Han Mateo Woodside 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market fllfl 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 14K8 

Economy Durability 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Eyes 
Dot her 
You? 



oo 



Guaranteed 

Work at 

27 7th St. 



DR. J. P. J U H L 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



NEGRO WINS THE PRIX GONCOURT 

A NEGRO writer, living in the heart of 
Central Africa, has won the Prix Gon- 
court, one of the most coveted literary prizes 
of France. The lucky author is Rene Ma- 
ran, and the work which brought him this 
signal distinction is his novel, "Batouala," 
a sombre picture of present-day life among 
the natives of the French possessions in 
Central Africa. 

"Batouala" is, besides, an unsparing in- 
dictment of the white masters of Africa, a 
grim record of what "civilization" has 
meant to some at least of the tribes of 
Africa. 

Rene Maran was born thirty-four years 
ago at Bordeaux in France. Both of his 
parents were of the colored race, natives of 
the French West Indies. While still a young 
student, he began writing and succeeded in 
getting a number of poems and other pieces 
accepted. Having finished his studies, the 
young writer took up his residence in the 
African wilds as a French Colonial official. 

"Batoula" takes its name from one of the 
principal characters, a petty chieftain of the 
region of Ubangi-Chari, one of the four sub- 
divisions comprised in French Equatorial 
Africa. Batouala, surrounded by his nine 
wives, his medicine men, his hunters and 
warriors, lives in primitive fashion in one of 
several villages over which he holds nominal 
sway. But, though he seems monarch of all 
he surveys, the real power is lodged in the 
hands of the local French commandant and 
his native gendarmerie. 

This story of primitive love and hate is 
developed amid striking scenes of native 
life. There is a description of a great native 
dance which reveals Rene Maran as a writer 
with a Zolaesque capacity for parading de- 
tails of filth and degradation and brutality. 
His realism is unbounded; at times he goes 
to lengths before which even the most ex- 
treme of modern French writers might hesi- 
tate. On the other hand, he draws splendid 
pictures of the African wilderness and cre- 
ates an atmosphere of vast spaces and sil- 
ence and mystery. And always, even when 
his Africans are dancing and reveling at 
their maddest, he succeeds in suggesting the 
unhappiness that besets them, the sword of 
Damocles which the white man holds sus- 
pended over their heads. 

The regime of Ubangi-Chari has been 
ruined in "civilization," declares the negro 
novelist. Villages which had 10,000 inhab- 
itants, now count little more than 1000. 
Famine and the cruelty of white taskmasters 
have decimated the population, he says; the 
entire population of certain districts has 
emigrated before their white oppressors to 
more remote homes, only to be pursued and 
again forced into slavery. 

He exhorts the literary men of France to 
help him in an effort to better the lot of the 
blacks in French Africa. He intends to un- 
dertake a regular campaign in behalf of the 
colored race, he announces. He says: 

"Civilization, civilization — pride of the 
Europeans and their charnel-house of inno- 
cents! — Rabindranath Tagore, the Hindu 
poet, told one day at Tokio what you really 
were ! 

"You build your kingdom on corpses. 
Whatever you may wish, whatever you may 




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ANNUAL MEETING 
The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 

The regular annual meeting of the stockhold- 
ers of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works mil he 
held at the office of the Corporation, 

Fremont Street. Sin Francisco. California, on 
Tuesday, the 14th day of February, 1922. at the 

f in o'clock a. m.. for the purr 
olectme a Board of Directors to serve for the 
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CHAS. O GARDNER, Secretary. 

75 Fremont Street. San Francisco 



do, you move amid lies. At sight of you 
tears spring up, pain cries out. You are the 
force which downs right. You are not a 
torch, but a conflagration. Whatever you 
touch you consume!" 



NEW SECURITIES FALL SHORT 

New security issues floated in the United 
States in the year 1921 exceeded those of 
the previous year, but fell short of the total 
for 1919. New issues last year, including 
refunding securities, aggregated $4,231,- 
320,478 against $4,010,048,184 in 1920 
and $4,361,188,860 in 1919. A good part 
of last year's total, however, was made up 
of issues put out for refunding purposes, 
and, therefore, involved to that extent no 
increase in the total amount of capital issues 
outstanding in the country. 

The strictly new demands upon the invest- 
ment markets for the year, according to the 
compilation made by The Commercial and 
Financial Chronicle, amounted to $3,574,- 
827,096 against $3,634,834,192 in 1920 
and $3,552,403,198 in 1919. 

In the case of corporate financing there 
was a marked falling off in the new capital 
demands, the amount of this having been 
only $1,821,919,761 in 1921 against $2, 
710,01 1,386 in 1920 and $2,303,328,636 in 

1919. This, it is pointed out, is independent 
of the issues put out to take up pre-existing 
obligations of one kind or another, the 
amount of which last year was $579,902,960 
against $256,293,311 in 1919. The large 
total for refunding purposes last year was 
due in part to the issue of $230,000,000 
Northern Pacific-Great Northern Railway 
joint 6J/2 per cent convertible bonds, which 
were put out to take up an outstanding issue 
of almost like amount. 



LECTURE ON ASTRONOMY 

The fifth of the present series of free 
popular lectures under the auspices of the 
Astronomical Society of the Pacific will be 
given at Native Sons' Hall on Friday, Feb- 
ruary I 7, at 8 p. m., by Doctor Gilbert N. 
Lewis, dean of the College of Chemistry of 
the University of California. His subject 
will be "Chemistry in the Service of Astron- 
omy," and will touch upon the possible evo- 
lution and transmutation of the elements as 
indicated in the chemical laboratory and in 
the study of the stars. 



VISIT OF SIR PHILIP GIBBS 

Sir Philip Gibbs, English journalist, who 
is a leading authority on international af- 
fairs, will be in San Francisco during Feb- 
ruary to deliver two lectures on important 
questions of the day. 

Having returned recently from a trip 
through the leading European countries, Sir 
Philip has obtained first hand information 
concerning the trend of international events. 



"Law me," an old lady said in front of a 
Smith Center store Saturday, "had I dared 
to wear knee-length skirts like the girls do 
now when I was young, I would have run 
down a man six years before I did." — Kan- 
sas City Star. 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability o£ 
Proprietors 



1 Aggregate Assets, 31st 
Mareh,1921 




.$ 24,S26,000.00 
. 17,125,000.00 

. 24,826,000.00 



$ 66,777,000.00 



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358 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

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Agents : 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

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SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

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MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31st, 1921 

Assets $ 71,851,299.62 

Deposits 68,201,299.62 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - 2,650,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ------ 371,753.46 

A Dividend of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4}4) per cent per annum wu 
declared for the six months ending December 31, 1921. 

BOND DEPARTMENT Sutter and Sansome Streets 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS Phone Kearny 5600 

NATIONAL BANK San Francisco, Calif. 

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VOL.JcCX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1922 



No. 7 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISE]; is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— From the viewpoint of a flapper in slippers and spider-web 
hosiery, are the rain storms better than the frost and snow? 

— Governor Stephens is whooping up the soldiers' bonus. His 
administration has already quadrupled taxes, and threatens a worse 

load. 

* ¥ * 

— The soldiers' bonus is almost as bad as a new war, but Hearst 
is urging' it. He inherited fifteen millions and has money to burn 

on his Presidential dream. 

* * * 

— During the five years ending wilh 1920, fire losses in California 
caused the destruction of property valued at the astonishing total 
of $54,213,871. What an awful indictment of our carelessness. 

* * # 

— Prohibition enforcement is taking the form of propaganda on 
the movie screens, showing how crime is decreasing. If that be 
true, we should move for police reduction at once. 
¥ ¥ * 

— Hearst's morning newspaper asks, "Why is it that among 
100,000,000 people, only two national birthdays are remembered?" 
Wait till you're elected to the White House, William, and there will 

be three. 

* * * 

— Waldemar Young, former dramatic editor of the Chronicle, 
now movie writer, says the police are hunting for scandals in Holly- 
wood instead of the slayer of Movie Director Taylor. They will not 
have to look far. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Fitting square pegs in round holes is no new thing in govern- 
ment. Montesquieu, writing of French politics over two hundred 
years ago, says: "A certain place required a mathematician, so 

they appointed a dancing master. 

¥ * ¥ 

—The Salvation Army claims to have helped over sixty thousand 
needy men in the past year at the industrial home. That is about 
half of the number the "closed shop" of the building trades put 
out of work or kept out of work. 

¥ * ¥ 

—As long as the intelligent public prefers pages about Fatty 
Arbuckle. and the love letters of the murdered movie director, to 
paragraphs about disarmament, world peace and the tariff, we must 
not expect civic improvement to be a record-breaker. 



— Thomas A. Edison in his seventy-fifth year, just started, is 
represented as full of great projects and burning the midnight oil 
on his work. So great and worthy a worker should realize that he 
must leave a vast amount undone for others to finish. 

— Hearst voices his patriotic anger over the Washington confer- 
ence, which, he says, prefaces domination of the white race by the 
yellow. The trouble is, William, that the public thinks Jap domina- 
tion can't be worse than yellow newspaper domination. 

— Chinese politicians are complaining that China did not get her 
rights at the Washington conference. It is an object lesson to all 
nations, that gross governmental corruption and lack of patriotism 
reduced China to the position of having to beg for her rights. 

— Rupert Hughes, the novelist, asks in virtuous anger why the 
newspapers have preferred movie scandals to such subjects as the 
recent elopement of a preacher and a chorus girl. If the preacher 
could draw an audience of a million a night they wouldn't over- 
look him. 

— It is an unsettled question in Congress whether there are 
eighty, or merely seventy-five, lawyers on- the Shipping Board and 
the Emergency Fleet Corporation. The easiest way to decide would 
be to see how many places there were to be grabbed. The legal 
profession naturally let none get by. 

— There is complication over the cellar of fine liquors left by 
the Los Angeles murdered movie director. Most prosperous people 
who figure in the newspapers these days have, or had, a stock of 
fine liquor, but the poor man cannot buy a glass of beer or wine. 
How long will the poor stand for it? 

* ¥ * 

— Billy Sunday has fears for the movies on account of their 
"getting in bad." Admitting their badness, they still have a wide 
margin on the Rev. Billy's profanation of the worship of God by 
dragging down the throne of the Almighty to the sawdust of the 
circus and the resined stage of the prize ring. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— William F. Humphreys, the attorney who figures in the pur- 
chase of many wooden vessels on the Pacific Coast from the Ship- 
ping Board, is the talented and popular president of the Olympic 
Club. An unsuccessful effort was made some years ago to induce 
him to run for Mayor of San Francisco. He was too wise. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Tim Reardon, president of the Board of Works, informs the 

reading public that the municipal building trades mechanics are 
willing to accept the IVi per cent cut agreed on by the Building 
Trades Council. Tim. wake up! The Building Trades Council is 
dead and buried. The open shop American plan rules henceforth. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




The activities of Harbor Commis- 
Calls for the Governor's Action sioner Fred S. Moody in connec- 
tion with the proposed construction 
of a drawbridge on Seventh street, contrary to the wishes of many 
property owners, demands prompt and decisive action by Governor 
Stephens. The Three Cities Chamber of Commerce intends to fight 
it out with the Harbor Commissioner, and have him explain why 
he is presumably using his official power in a matter which affects 
the property in which he is interested. Is the Harbor Commission 
Department to be made a law agency and a political club by Mr. 
Moody, ostensibly expressing the purposes of the state government, 
but really, it is said, acting for his own private interests? That is 
in substance the complaint of the Three Cities Chamber of Com- 
merce, composed of representative citizens of San Mateo, Hills- 
borough, Burlingame and other suburban communities. 

At the meeting of our San Francisco Board of Supervisors last 
week, so large a political representation of the Harbor Commission's 
official force appeared to give its moral support to Commissioner 
Moody's bridge scheme that Mayor Rolph ironically remarked he 
was pleased to see so much interest displayed in civic projects. The 
janitor of the Harbor Commission was one of the attendant citizens 
in the unusually large gathering at the Supervisors' meeting, and 
got into a heated controversy with the head of the Three Cities 
Chamber of Commerce. The newspapers next day described the 
verbal encounter as "almost a fist-fight." The public, reading of 
the affair, must have been puzzled to understand what the janitor 
of the Harbor Commission was doing in the lobby of the Board of 
Supervisors, when a drawbridge on Seventh street was under con- 
sideration. Why wasn't the janitorial lobbyist busy with his broom 
and dustpan in the Harbor Commissioner's offices? If there be so 
little janitor work for him to do, why should not the broom brigade 
be cut down and the taxpayers' load be lightened? 

If the janitorial contingent could spare the time to lobby Com- 
missioner Moody's drawbridge scheme through the Board of Super- 
visors, doubtless the wharfingers and the collectors were also repre- 
sented, though none of them got tangled up in a verbal tilt with 
the head of the Three Cities Chamber of Commerce. No wonder 
Mayor Rolph was astonished at the unusual size of the attendance 
and made his ironical remark on the display of public interest in 
civic betterment. 

One of the great evils of our government, municipal, state and 
federal, is the tendency of the officials to regard public trust as a 
private snap. On the face of it, the effort of Commissioner Moody 
to force through a bridge scheme which is said to affect his private 
property appears highly improper. It is a matter calling for the 
careful investigation by Governor Stephens. Taxpayers are closely 
observing the conduct of all officials this year. 



Departmental publicity agents in Washington 
The Tax-Eating Pest are tireless in impressing on editors the vast 

sums saved by experiments under Govern- 
ment experts. Particularly is this true of the activities of experts of 
the Department of Agriculture. Now we hear that crops and range 
grasses saved for the flocks and herds by the campaign against 
prairie dogs and ground squirrels in the West total in value more 
than $54,000,000 since the campaign was first started on a large 
scale in 1916. During the last year 18,331,861 acres of federal, 
state and private lands were given first poison treatment, and fol- 
low-up work was done on 4,402,662 acres. Poison grain to the 
amount of 1235 tons was distributed by the Department of Agri- 



culture among the 104,523 farmers and stockmen who took part 
in the work. The campaign is being conducted now in sixteen 
states, and as a result of the work during the last year it is esti- 
mated that food products valued at $11,000,000 have been saved 
from the pests. Nearly 8,000,000 acres of land have been treated 
and largely cleared of the animals up to the present time. 

How the total of damage by the rodent pests is arrived at is 
beyond humanity ingenuity to figure out. The finest expert in the 
world could do no more than make a guess at it, and in all likeli- 
hood it would be a very wild guess. 

It is possible to figure out the cost to the taxpayers of conducting 
the war on squirrels and prairie dogs by our Government, for there 
is data at Washington of the salaries of the great army of officials. 
One can easily learn, approximately, what it cost the taxpayers for 
the thirty-five large buildings occupied by the Department of Agri- 
culture. Whether the saving of crops by the poisoning of squirrels 
and prairie dogs would pay what the Government spends on the 
experiments can be only guesswork. And always there is the ques- 
tion, why should such costs be assessed to all the people who pay 
the taxes? The poisoning of squirrels and prairie dogs may be 
highly beneficial, but why depend on the Department of Agriculture 
to foot all the bills? Are the farmers too lazy to do the poisoning 
or too miserly to pay for the poison? Have we not a long string 
of state colleges with chemists continually putting forth circulars 
relative to the destruction of all pests? But the most voracious of 
all is the great North American tax-eating pest. Truly, the" unfor- 
tunate American taxpayer is being devoured by the fauna of pa- 
ternal and bureaucratic government that are becoming as numerous 
as the Biblical locusts of Egypt that plagued Pharoah. 



Free Ireland has troubles a-plenty 
Politicians Desirous of Trouble already. The striking railroad men 

at Cork are talking of seizing the 
lines and operating them, and the Irish Republican army is kid- 
naping orangemen. Perhaps to prevent civil war, John Bull will 
have to march back the troops he lately moved away. As long as 
bonds for "Irish freedom" can be marketed in the United States by 
New York politicians, the Green Isle will have pecks of trouble. It 
may be the old agitation in Cuba with a Celtic setting. 



No sooner does Congress pass the farm- 
The Farmer Wants It All ers' co-operative marketing law than the 
grangers take steps to put all the middle- 
men out of business. Grain elevators are to be built, we learn; 
warehouses are to be provided. Everything which enables the farmer 
to gain all the profits is being hurried. The reasonable supposition 
is that if the public is not willing to give the farmer his price, he 
will practice all the marketing arts peculiar to trusts of middlemen. 

Now, let it be said at the outset that the farmer is the most 
essential factor in the modern world. He is the producer on whom 
nearly all the parasite species of civilized beings live. He is the 
most useful and most beneficially industrious member of the com- 
munity, but he forgets that, while all the others have to live on his 
labor, their needs make his own occupation profitable. The farm- 
ers' dream of getting all the profits is as old as civilization, and is 
only a dream. If all the middlemen and their delivery force and 
their bookkeepers and stenographers were eliminated from his list 
of ultimate customers, the farmers' market would be reduced to 
pitiful limits. 

The more that civilization advances and human comfort and 



February 18, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



luxury are increased, the greater the army of middlemen and their 
assistants. Civilization is very complex. Its success depends on 
co-ordination, the combination of many agencies into harmonious 
action. When the harmonious processes of civilization are thrown 
into discord by war, or strikes, or riots, there is loss of time and 
of efficiency, until the various activities are readjusted to work in 
unison. 

Wild-eyed reformers, with a panacea for all human ills, never 
succeed because they overlook the fact that their reforms create 
derangement and confusion. Every orderly condition of civilization 
has taken time to function. Things cannot be thrown out of gear 
and the machine restored to efficiency in a moment. 

Once upon a time the American farmer drove his wagon into the 
village on market days and the housewives bought their vegetables 
and fruit and butter and poultry on the sidewalk an carried them 
home. Contrast that with the apartment house matron's marketing 
activities today. The telephone does her shopping. So it is in all 
lines. The middleman and his assistants are indispensable. Dispos- 
ing of them by passing laws in a hurry is like making the world 
free from alcohol, beer and wine by writing the word "prohibition" 
large in the Constitution. It is a phase of hysteria which time- 
serving politicians help to make more aggravated. 

It is right for the farmer to fight against extortion by the middle- 
man, but the latter cannot be eliminated, and if he were the farmer 
would be loser. "The laborer is worthy of his hire," wherever he 
fits into the elaborate mechanism of civilization. 



The construction of the Duboce 
Consolidate the City Railroads tunnel to open up Sunset having 

been determined on by the Super- 
visors, it is time that a definite arrangement be made for railroad 
co-operation of the municipal lines and the privately owned tracks. 
Costly and unprofitable competition is to be avoided as far as pos- 
sible, and as soon. For instance, the Market Street Railway has a 
line to ocean beach on the south side of Golden Gate Park. The 
tentative plan of the Duboce tunnel contemplates connection with 
a municipal line on Judah street, when in the opinion of sbme en- 
gineers a line on Lawton street two blocks to the south would be 
more useful. Entire co-operation of the private lines and the 
municipal lines is absolutely necessary, and the sooner it is arranged 
the better for the districts to be provided with improved transpor- 
tation. It will be better for the residents and the taxpayers who in 
the end will have to pay for the work. The public has reached the 
conclusion that consolidation of the private and the public lines 
cannot be delayed. The meeting of the Mayor, City Engineer, 
Supervisors and City Attorney this week to discuss the terms pro- 
posed by the Market Street Railroad Company will clear the way 
for definite action. 

The proposition that the city had better defer action until the 
franchises of the Market Street Railway Company revert to the 
municipality finds little favor with many taxpayers. Operating on 
that prospect, the private lines could not do otherwise than de- 
teriorate. In the end it would cost the taxpayers much more to 
place them in proper condition. If we can buy the private lines, 
available for co-operation with the municipal roads, we should do 
so as soon as possible and proceed with the development of our 
seaport. 

We have deliberately brought upon ourselves the present expen- 
sive condition by preferring class politics to sound business. Private 
railroad lines could only be built and properly maintained by allow- 
ing them to earn adequate interest on their investment. But our 
expressed public policy has been to permit no privately owned lines 
any return on their investment. On the contrary, we have tried to 
drive them out of business so as to establish the policy of public 
ownership. No private companies depending on their earnings and 
paying heavy taxes can hope to compete with public companies 



supported out of the taxes should they fail to meet expenses. 

To proceed with the intention of driving private railroads into 
bankruptcy, so that we might replace them with new municipal 
lines, has been a foolish policy. The lines of the Market Street 
Railway Company are essential to any efficient system of transpor- 
tation we may plan, and if we can get them on the payment of 
the price out of the earnings, we should not hesitate to do so. To 
permit the private lines to deteriorate under our ruinous policy of 
private and public antagonism would be unthinkable. 

We are committed to the policy of public ownership, and we 
should endeavor to make it as good as possible. We should not 
delay its operation or make it costly and obnoxious by mingling 
politics with the business of transportation. Private roads and 
municipal lines in ruinous rivalry can never pay. Let us not destroy 
both by a narrow policy towards one. 



A correspondent of the Chronicle, writing in 
Rapacious Profiteers the Safety Valve, asks why, in this land 
where fruit is plentiful and one of the big 
industries of the state, the products of the California orchards can- 
not be purchased as cheaply in San Francisco as they can in New 
York City? The correspondent came here recently from New York, 
where the finest California grown fruits are on display in all the 
fruit stalls. In the East they consider this fruit a luxury and as 
such do not look upon the price asked for it as at all unreasonable, 
but imagine the correspondent's surprise when he came here to find 
that the San Francisco dealers are charging for California fruit 
prices they would consider in New York as almost prohibitive. 
There must be something wrong somewhere, he concludes. 

There is something very wrong. There has been shameless rob- 
bery of the buying public. The canning trusts in the past few years 
have pocketed fortunes. A canned peach, cut into a few slices, 
was about their idea of giving the public the worth of its money 
for 50 cents. As long as the craziness of squandering money lasted, 
the harvest of the food profiteers proceeded, but now buyers are 
growing saner and wiser. They realize that they have been robbed. 
This is a bad condition for California, as it restricts the market. 
California is not the only place which produces fruit in large quan- 
tities, and its reputation should not be allowed to be injured by 
profiteers without conscience. 

The slump in business has been largely due to the merciless de- 
termination to make the buying public pay the last cent. In the 
clothing and shoe lines the profiteering has been outright robbery, 
for inferior goods have been furnished at the inflated prices. 

A shoe firm on Market street was able, by a few years' of profi- 
teering, to buy for over half a million dollars the building where it 
had done business for a few years. The official reports of Secretary 
Hoover give an idea of the vast gains of profiteers in shoes. Hun- 
dreds of thousands of dozen* of American shoes were exported in 
the past three months, and, according to the reports of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce, the average price per pair was $2.40. The 
same grades of American shoes were sold in the United States at 
prices all the way from $10 per pair to $20. 

The business policy of our American profiteers is not to do a 
large business at small profit, but a small business at enormous 
profits. The result is stagnation in buying and unemployment. We 
would have some relief from the extortion if the trust laws were 
enforced, but "organized labor" took the teeth out of the injunction 
remedy against trusts by making injunctions almost inoperative 
against labor. In trying to make injunctions operative against capi- 
tal but inoperative against labor, the public has been left without 
protection from any kind of a trust bold enough to push its profi- 
teering to the limit. 



— The judge in the rotten Stillman case insists on more speed in 
the trial. Probably he's afraid they won't buy him a new gas mask. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1922 



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I Cancel Allies' Oek, Says Clark© S 

B S * I 



IN an extended article in the New York Times, Justice John H. 
Clarke of the United States Supreme Court advocates the can- 
cellation of all the debts of the Allies, now amounting in round 
numbers to eleven billions of dollars, truly a great sum of money. 
Justice Clarke first considers the cancellation proposal from the 
point of sound business. It is not possible, he argues, for any of 
the Allies, with the exception of perhaps Great Britain, to pay even 
the interest, much less the principal, of its loan. 

The national debt of Great Britain before the war was three and 
a half billions of dollars; its debt now is variously estimated from 
thirty-five to forty billions. The national debt of France before the 
war was six and one-half billions of dollars; it is now estimated at 
from twenty-seven to thirty-five billions. The public debt of Italy 
before the war was three billions of dollars; it is now variously 
estimated at from eleven to fifteen billions. 

The estimated wealth of the United Kingdom before the war was 
eighty-five billions of dollars. The estimated wealth of France be- 
fore the war was sixty-five billions of dollars. The estimated national 
wealth of Italy before the war was sixteen billions of dollars. 

The national wealth of our country is estimated at 220 billions 
and our war debt is twenty-two billions of dollars. 

It is impossible for the Government of Italy, though it may have 
the best intentions in the world, to pay annually the sum of $550,- 
000.000 to $750,000,000, 5 per cent, on its national debt. It is 
equally clear that it is not possible for France to pay the enormous 
interest charge of 1350 to 1500 millions of dollars a year. It is 
very plainly not possible, even with the imposition of crushing 
taxes, for France or Italy to pay us and their other creditors even 
the interest upon their debts, and therefore it is impossible, of 
course, for them to make provision for a sinking fund to retire 
them. It is unhappily true that both of these nations have been 
left by the great war in what amounts to national bankruptcy. 

"There remains Great Britain," says Justice Clarke. "Never in 
all her long history has that nation held so great a place in the 
world as it holds today. It is a proud and powerful people, and its 
statesmen say, doggedly rather than confidently, 'Britain pays its 
debts.' But many British economists say payment is impossible." 

"But since there may be differences of opinion as to the ability 
of our Allies to pay, let us, as we lawyers say, for the sake of the 
argument assume that they may be able to pay if the time for 
payment is extended over many — say thirty to fifty — years. Still I 
think as a matter of sound business we should cancel the loans. 

"They cannot pay with gold or securities, for they have none of 
these; nor with products of the soil, for not one of the three pro- 
duces sufficient to feed its own people. There remains but one pos- 
sible form of payment — manufactured commodities, or credits de- 
rived from the sale of such commodities." 

To accept payment in goods from our debtors when we have too 
much goods to sell, would be going from bad to worse, argues 
Justice Clarke. Finally he considers the matter from the sentimental 
side, and concludes we should certainly cancel our huge claim. 
Great Britain then could wipe out the debts of the Allies to her. 
She borrowed the money from Uncle Sam and lent it to the Allies. 
The financial problem could be solved by wiping the slate clean 
and letting Uncle Sam charge his eleven billions "to profit and 
loss." It is all so easy to say when you are not paying it out of 
your own money. Justice Clarke is one of those happy mortals who 
does not even pay income tax. 



The trouble in arriving at sound conclusions on the great war 
debt owed us is that people start wrong on the causes of the war, 
and draw their conclusions from half truths. 

The war was not to make the world "safe for democracy." It 
was not a holy crusade for the freedom of humanity, respecting the 
cant of the politicians in the last year of the struggle. It was an 
inevitable war growing out of the racial hatreds of France and 
Germany and the willingness of Great Britain to let them fight and 
wear themselves out. She would remain undisputed mistress of the 
sea and world finance. 

For years we kept aloof from the struggle. Wilson was re-elected 
"because he kept us out of the war." 

When the tragedy of the Lusitania drew us in, and all the 
harpies of war fattened on the graft of the shipyards and army 
contracts, politicians raised the cry, "The world must be made free 
for democracy!" Who was to make it safe? The two dynastic 
rulers of the Central Empires were fighting the iron autocracy of 
Russia; the Empire of Great Britain and India, half a dozen petty 
kings and the Republic of France, which is more royal than demo- 
cratic. The struggle eliminated the despotic Empire of Russia as 
well as Germany and Austria, and destroyed these markets of Brit- 
ish and American trade. Hence the dislocation of commerce and 
industry. 

Germany was not merely reduced to second rank in national 
commercial importance and ambition, but was laid prostrate under 
defeat in the field and overwhelmed by a great debt to compensate 
France. 

It is waste of time for Justice Clarke to talk of eleven billions 
owing to America, from a strict business standpoint. There never 
was any strict business about it — nothing but war madness, racial 
antagonism, graft, human selfishness and avarice. Now there is 
shuffling to shift the responsibility and beat the creditors. Nobody 
wants to begin paying up, hoping Uncle Sam will offer himself as 
the sacrificial goat on the altar of brotherly love. 

Better begin the sacrificial ceremonies in Europe. Let France re- 
duce her army nearly a million men and be satisfied to collect a 
reasonable indemnity from Germany,. instead of trying to hold the 
German race in subjection forever. Germany is the center of all 
the international jumble. Her workmen are flooding the markets of 
the world with cheap goods, in their fervor to meet their great war 
debt. In our United States House of Representatives the other day 
Congressman Fordney exhibited a pocket knife for which he was 
charged five dollars at Marshall Field's in Chicago, and which cost 
the firm nine cents wholesale in Germany. No wonder mechanics 
in England and American stand idle in the face of competition 
which offers enormous gains to American profiteers. With the great 
sum France expects from Germany and reduction of her vast army, 
she should be able to repay some of the billions lent by Britain, 
and by her borrowed from Uncle Sam. France added immensely 
to her colonial advantages by the war. She admits it. 

Italy has also been advantaged by the war. Let her abate her 
military spirit and pay her honest debts. Every European country 
is still war mad and never will be different. The tradition has got 
into their blood. The longer it takes them to pay their debts, the 
further off the next war. With all the financial lame ducks cf 
Europe getting on their feet. Great Britain can pay some of her 
obligations to the United States, and undoubtedly is desirous of 
(Continued on Page 11) 



February 18, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




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Why Soldiers' Bonus is Not Good 



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AS it is practically certain the soldiers' bonus bill will pass both 
Houses by an overwhelming majority, it is interesting to know 
the opinions of the principal lawmakers opposed to it. There are 
twelve outspoken and well-known Senators opposed to it. Borah is 
one of the best known. He says he objects to the bonus bill because 
it carries a cash proposition in it. If a real land bill could be for- 
mulated he would vote for it. 

"For those men who went to war and never returned, in many 
instances leaving behind them wives and children or dependent par- 
ents, I have the deepest concern and as far as possible the Gov- 
ernment should stand in the place of the dead," Borah has declared. 
"And those who returned shattered in mind and broken in body, 
mangled in limb and afflicted with disease, they should be the 
objects of the Government's vigilant and constant and generous 
care. But when I am asked to unlock the treasury of the United 
States to those who were fortunate enough to pass through the 
ordeal unscathed, when I am asked to pay from the public funds 
large sums to those who have received no injury, I am bound to 
ask myself upon what principle may I do this? The money is not 
mine, I cannot give it to charity. I must find some moral or legal 
basis upon which to proceed." 

Borah objects to the Senate Finance Committee's declaration that 
the bonus would be for services rendered. 

"What services?" asks Borah. "In one breath they tell us we 
went to war for humanity and for civilization, and in the next that 
we went for compensation. The soldier can leave to his children 
no finer legacy than a record of service in the great war. 

"We have reached a crisis in this country with reference to finan- 
cial and economic affairs. When we consider the public debt of 
the United States, the public debt of our respective states, the 
public debt of our cities, and then contemplate the fact that our 
taxes are still at high tide, it is not very difficult to realize what 
this cash bonus business means. The man is blind who does not 
recognize that the most wide-spread and threatening aspect of pub- 
lic affairs at this time is the feeling on the part of the people 
everywhere that their Government, either through indifference or 
incapacity, cannot or will not relieve them of the crushing burdens 
under which they are now bending. 

"The soldiers of this country cannot be aided except as the 
country itself is rehabilitated. The soldier cannot come back except 
as the whole people come back. The soldier cannot prosper unless 
the people prosper. What good will it do the soldier to receive aid 
if by receiving it he depresses the value of the Liberty bond which 
his mother may have purchased or which his neighbors may have 
purchased, or increases the taxes which his father or his mother or 
his neighbors must pay? The handing out to him of a few dollars 
will not benefit him under such circumstances, but it will greatly 
injure the prospects of the country and the restoration of normal 
conditions." 

Senator Carter Glass of Virginia is opposed to the bonus bill, 
because he believes its passage will greatly injure the general 
finances of the business communities of the L nited States and con- 
fuse the Government finances just to the extent that it will harass 
the Government itself in its efforts to bring about a return of nor- 
mal conditions throughout the country. 

"And also let us not forget." says Senator Glass, "that it will 
depress the twenty-two and odd billions of outstanding Government 
securities owned by nearly 23.000.000 people and incalculable losses 
to these people may be the result. When one considers that billions 



of these securities are held by estates and by millions of people of 
small means, the hardships that would be precipitated by the pas- 
sage of this bill are difficult to compute. 

"Moreover, the business depression that would be caused and 
which would reflect itself upon the ex-soldiers themselves will be 
such that in the end the bonus will cost these men more than the 
compensation they will receive will amount to. 

"And, aside from all this, I am opposed to the proposed bonus 
legislation because I am utterly opposed to any proposition that 
involves the commercializing of the patriotism of the United States." 

John Sharpe Williams of Mississippi is opposed to the bonus bill 
because he is antagonistic to commercialism of patriotism, and the 
bill proposes to give money to every man and boy who enlisted, 
whether he was ever under fire or not. He does not think the men 
who were in our armies have a right to claim they saved the coun- 
try, and be allowed to bankrupt the country. 

Senator Oscar Underwood of Alabama is opposed to the bonus. 
"If we are going to measure patriotic services in dollars, the fabric 
of our republic will fall. Was it dollars that held the tattered army 
of Washington together at Valley Forge?" 

Senator James W. Wadsworth of New York is opposed. "If the 
payment of bonus is to become our settled policy, then indeed we 
have changed our conception of the duty of patriotism." 

Other Senators outspoken in their opposition to the bonus bill 
are: W. Wadsworth Jr. of New York, Underwood of Alabama, 
Borah of Idaho, Glass of Virginia, Francis E. Warren of Wyoming, 
William H. King of Utah, Knute Nelson of Minnesota, Sharp Wil- 
liams of Mississippi, Henry L. Myers of Montana, George Wharton 
Pepper of Pennsylvania, Nathaniel B. Dial of South Carolina, and 
Ellison D. Smith of South Carolina. 



A BITTER LESSON 

The President has called attention to the aftermath of war. 
Everybody can see it. Society the world over is in a state of dis- 
organization and confusion. Millions of workers are without em- 
ployment or regular income, and their dependent families are in 
distress. In the United States the crops of foodstuffs have been 
ample, but the producers are unable to dispose of them at remun- 
erative prices because the would-be consumers are unable to buy. 
That this state of affairs is deplorable, all are agreed. The bitter 
lesson should make us all the readier to ratify and act on the pact 
in the Pacific for peace and disarmament. 



EUROPE'S FAMOUS WONDER GLASS 
X M\l!Vi:i.nts NEW INVEXTIOX 
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The "Binoculette' 



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Sin 




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mill's vest norkrt or liid*'* itiir»c. and wrichs only ly% ounrr*. 

1 «rful Indoor*. U Out. Rriolar Prlr* S3.",. 00. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Optical Expert md Importers of Optica] Specialties 

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9S0 Murkfl Street, h'twffn Maion nml Taylor BtVMAl 

PROMPT ATTENTION* GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1922 




'Hair & Cntr ' }&> lb* '<kvilarC Itou T 

Ooe &U wdlf&r (Ik tktil.sir, with pa 

— The election of a woman member of the Board of Supervisors 
promises to be epochal. Miss Morgan, the feminine "city father," 
addressed a woman's club this week on the herculean task of im- 
proving City Hall debates on municipal affairs. She regards it as 
a heavy but necessary task to banish slang from Board meetings. 
One of the objectionable epithets to be tabooed is "windjammer." 
It grates on the nerves of the gracious lady, though she has no- 
ticed it has no serious effect on the feelings of her male colleagues. 
They call one another "windjammers," and when she thinks their 
next gesture is to be a punch on the jaw the apparently bellicose 
statesmen shake hands or treat to a cigar. 

— Perhaps the lady Supervisor missed the real purpose of such 
offerings after a dialogue full of personalities. Treating to a cigar 
may be as deadly as treating to a drink of bootleg whisky. The 
festive cabbage leaves that pass current in political life as choice 
products of Havana are seldom loaded with anything less deadly 
than dynamite. That they seldom kill a politician, and never a 
Supervisor, is proof that the boarding house chicken has nothing 
on them in powers of resistance 

* * * 

— Supervisor Miss Morgan's desire to make the Board of Super- 
visors a body of Chesterfields is revolutionary. From the days when 
the tide came up to Montgomery street it has been the aim of 
Supervisoral etiquette to speak the plain truth to colleagues, but 
never to the public. There would be a revolt of the citizens if that 
long-established habit were changed. Listening to the truths the 
Supervisors tell one another in hot debate is the only relief from 
the endless strain of paying taxes. 

* # * 

— It would cause a public sensation equal to finding the evening 
papers without mention of Fatty Arbuckle, or the Hollywood mur- 
der, to read that the Board of Supervisors had adjourned without 
a scrap. What a profound sensation, should Supervisor Hayden at 
the end of a fine oration on the reduction of Civic Auditorium 
janitors' pay be showered with fine verbal bouquets by Supervisor 
Joe Mulvahill, or sprinkled with cologne instead of tabasco by 
Supervisor John Hynes. The audience of street repairers would 
fall off their seats. The routine of the City Hall would stop. Mayor 
Jim Rolph would have to declare a half holiday and rush out onto 
the City Hall steps to make a speech in favor of the soldiers' 
bonus. It would take some time to get things running smoothly 
again in our municipality. 

— Los Angeles has her faults, but getting rid of people who 
knock the town is not one of them. In Los Angeles recently a 
chronic knocker in the auto trade made himself particularly ob- 
jectionable. A committee of business men waited on the gentleman 
and asked if his soreness was past all remedies. 

"I'm sore clean through," he replied. "I wish I'd never settled 
in this town." 

"So do we," echoed the committe; "we're quits on that score. 
The best thing you can do is to get out, we guess." 

"I only wish I could. How soon I'd make tracks!" 

"What do you want for your business? Oh, you don't want to 
sell? Well, you'd better quit." 

Finally the grouch named his price and made it high. 

"If you could get that figure, we'd see no more of you?" 

"Betcher sweet life!" 



"All right. Make out your bill of sale." 

"When?" 

"Right this minute. The money is waiting for you," said the 
spokesman, showing a check book. 

And they held him to his offer. 

"When you can't get along without a chronic grouch, you're no 
good to the town — if you're any good to yourself," they told him, 
and they made him see it from their viewpoint. 

What a gainer San Francisco would be if a committee handed 
their passports to certain newspaper trouble-makers who are con- 
stantly fomenting injurious political agitation or identifying the city 
by sensational reports of salacious scandals and crime. 

If merchants did not give their advertisements to those yellow 
sheets, they would soon be hand-bills. 



NORTHCLIFFE DESCRIBES CHINESE DINING CAR 

Lord Northcliffe's description of a Chinese dining car is interest- 
ing: 

"We said good-bye to exquisite Japan at Shimonoseki — a nasty, 
windy wharf, which reminded me unpleasantly of Holyhead Pier on 
an ugly night. There followed an interlude on the Sea of Japan in 
a steam called in Japanese 'The Wine-loving Gentleman.' 

"From Fusan, the port of Korea, to Mukden we traveled, still in 
luxury, under the watchful care of the Japanese South Manchurian 
Railway, revelling in the best sort of comfort and still wondering 
about dainty, war-like Japan. 

"We paused at Seoul, the capital of Korea; then, at Mukden, we 
entered both Russia and China; and, with the suddenness of a 
slamming door, the cultivated beauty of puzzling Japan was gone, 
and we were in a country several centuries behind the times. 

"Attached to our train from Mukden to Peking was a private 
car, or, as it is properly called in Chinese, an 'enshrouded carriage' 
— a good and comfortable car, but not nearly so good as its nature. 
There was a dining car in the train, but it was not at all like a 
Japanese dining car. It was, if I may say so, excessively demo- 
cratic. China is suffering at present (she will get over it) from an 
acute attack of infantile republicanism — the kind in which every 
man is greatly the superior of every other and official salaries are 
always overdue. 

"Consequently, some of China's dining cars resemble public 
houses. Everyone comes in, whether he means to eat or not, and 
brings all his luggage with him. Everyone makes as much noise as 
possible. Some bring malodorous and repellent coolies in with them. 
Many smoke rank tobacco, heedless of meal times. And, be heaven 
my witness, everyone spits without pause. 

"That habit was the only thing to remind us of Japan. We had 
known violent contrast, indeed. And it takes some stoicism to sit 
out even the shortest repast in such surroundings as were ours in 
that Chinese dining car." 



SAFEGUARDING FIRE HAZARDS 

In 1921 the loss of life by fire was 15,000, and loss of property 
$500,000,000. The terrible record must be credited with at least 
one good result, in that the high rates required to meet losses made 
the amount of insurance premium paid such a sum that individual 
insurers began to consider how it could be reduced, and, on account 
of this, the specific rate for the individual risk, instead of the class 
rate, has come into existence. If the man with a frame risk of haz- 
ardous occupancy improved his building by protecting the vertical 
openings, such as stairways and elevators, and safeguarded the spe- 
cial hazards of his process, and was located in a city with especially 
good protection, he certainly became a more desirable risk and 
might be even safer than a brick building, dirty, and with unpro- 
tected stairways, located under poorer protection, with, perhaps, a 
less hazardous occupancy but not being safeguarded. 



February 18, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



JACKDAW WOMEN 

The shoplifter is a species of humanity known to England as 
well as here. The London Times calls them "Jackdaw women," and 
thus describes their habits: 

"The crowded state of the West End shops during the sales and 
the greater freedom with which pretty articles are strewn about on 
the counters are giving the store detectives a busy time just now. 
Practically every big West End store, for its own protection, has to 
maintain a special staff of men and women, solely to prevent pilfer- 
ing by women shoppers, and it is no infrequent occurrence for eight 
to ten delinquents to be caught in one day. Blouses and pieces of 
silk, which are light and easily concealed, have a peculiar fascina- 
tion for women. 

"The curious thing is that, in the main, these women are not pro- 
fessional thieves, but first offenders who have suddenly given way 
to temptation. 'Jackdaw women' is the description given to them 
by the manager of a big Oxford street store. 'They are like jack- 
daws, monkeys and babies,' he says. 'They see some article that 
attracts them, and before they can resist the impulse they have 
stretched out their hand and "grabbed" it. It is a form of acquisi- 
tiveness which catches women unawares, and we always deal sym- 
pathetically with such people.' Not one of these first offenders ap- 
pears before the public police court, but, instead, there is a kind 
of informal court held in the superintendent's or manager's office, 
the main purpose of which is to frighten the woman so much that 
she will never forget the offense. The delinquents range from women 
in good social position to out-of-work girl clerks, with a sprinkling 
of professional thieves, who, of course, are promptly handed over 
to the official police. 'Again and again well-to-do women,' this 
manager said, 'have been unable to give me any reason why they 
purloined a particular article, and usually I find the surest way to 
bring them to their senses is to threaten to telephone for their hus- 
bands. We keep them in suspense for a time, and they do not 
forget the experience.' " 



CHARLES M. SCHWAB'S ADVICE 

"We should stop knocking out railroads, our railroad presidents 
and railroad men in general. The railroads have had an awful 
drubbing, such as no other industry in the history of this nation 
has ever gone through." So said Charles M. Schwab, in a speech 
at New York. 

"Look about you, examine the names of the men who are today 
at the head of our railroads. Do you know a single one who does 
not deserve your implicit confidence? They are not speculators; 
they are not grafters; they are high minded public servants de- 
serving of public trust and of public enthusiasm. 

"Most of the railroad presidents started at the bottom of the 
ladder. Going through the list you will find that our railroad officers 
are today among the very best illustrations of what American boys 
can do with opportunity and ambition. There isn't a man today at 
the head of an American railroad who is not a credit to the indus- 
try with which he is connected, and an asset to his country. 

"The American people are today boss of the railroads. Let us 
honor these men, help them in the solution of their difficulties, and 
make them feel that we are with them for progress and prosperity. 
Let us back our railroad officers as the manager of a great industry 
would get behind his department heads. 

"At every turn our railroad managers are hemmed in by rules, 
regulations and restrictions which deprive them of power to exercise 
their discretion, prevent the exercise of the sound business judgment 
which has grown out of their long experience and interfere with 
their doing acts which, if done, would contribute immeasurably to 
the restoration of prosperity." 



WHAT PROHIBITION IS COSTING 

Referring to the effects of two years of prohibition in America, 
the New York correspondent of the London Telegraph says: 

"How much smuggling exists, and how many private cellars are 
used as breweries, we do not really know. It is certain, however, 
that 'ginmills,' corresponding to corner pubs in England, will never 
be tolerated again. 

"The chief cause of complaint is that the law is discriminatory, 
because people with money can always buy from 'bootleggers,' and 
the poor cannot. Vested interests report that their money values 
have depreciated as owners of breweries and saloons, etc., by 
$3,000,000,000, exclusive of the loss to makers of special machin- 
ery. The cost to the Government of enforcing the dry laws last 
year exceeded $200,000,000, and many places are still very damp." 



Washington's 

Birthday 

Excursions 




--between all points where 
one way fare is $25.00 or 
less— minimum round trip 
fare fifty cents- 



25% Reduction for 
Round Trip 

adding enough to make fare end in 
naught or five 

SALE DATES -Feb. 21 22 

Return Limit February 23, 1922 

For fares and train service — 

See Agents 

Southern Pacific Lines 

30 POST ST.— FERRY STATION— THIRD ST. STATION 
or Phone Sutter 4000 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18. 1922 




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Points £©r Property Oweer§ 



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IF the political side of the controversy over the Seventh street 
drawbridge were eliminated there would be little left of it, ex- 
cept that the Moody and Knight estates want the drawbridge built 
and maintained, and Harbor Commissioner Moody has a lively per- 
sonal interest in the scheme. 

There is no valid reason why the representative citizens of San 
Mateo county and San Francisco should not send a committee on 
a special train to Sacramento to present reasons to Governor 
Stephens why Harbor Commissioner Moody should be removed. 

The drawbridge would cost at least $50,000 a year to main'ain, 
and over $1 ,000,000 to build. Our taxpayers have no money to 
spend in pulling legal and political chestnuts out of the fire for 
heirs of pioneers. 

Supervisor McLeran Is Wrong 

Supervisor McLeran is opposed to the plan of sending a delega- 
tion to present reasons to Governor Stephens for the removal of 
Commissioner Moody. It would not be acting in good faith with 
the city of San Francisco and the Railroad Commission, which 
should be allowed to straighten out the tangles in the Seventh street 
bridge affair, declares Mr. McLeran. As to the building of the 
drawbridge Supervisor McLeran is unalterably opposed. He is right. 
The bridge would be a serious detriment to San Francisco. Not 
only would it be a heavy expense to the taxpayers, but it would 
be an enormous handicap to transportation to and from San Fran- 
cisco. The train service would be materially delayed, and the in- 
juries and annoyance to the public serious and indescribable. To 
permit such an impediment to transportation, at a time when the 
cry is for fast service and low rates, would be willful stupidity, 
especially when the only argument for the obstruction is that its 
erection would help the personal scheme of a harbor official, inter- 
ested in feathering his nest. 

What Does San Francisco Owe to Railroad Commission? 

There is no reason why San Francisco should be unduly sensitive 
about courtesy in matters which come under the notice of the Rail- 
road Commissioners. Supervisor McLeran's plea that the Railroad 
Commissioners should be allowed to straighten out the Seventh 
street bridge tangle does not appeal very strongly to San Francisco 
taxpayers. The Railroad Commission was allowed to straighten out 
the "tangles" in our contentions with Spring Valley, and what is 
the result? We have lately had a water rate increase of 20 per 
cent. Water rates are almost prohibitive. It costs as much for 
water now as if the Spring Valley Company were manufacturing it 
out of oxygen and hydrogen, instead of just building a cement dam 
and impounding surface water from the hills. Beer was made from 
grain in the ante-prohibition days almost as cheap as water is now 
furnished by the gallon to San Francisco water payers. 

Metering Water in Flats Highly Unjust 

It is a crime against property owners to force them to pay for 
water in flats as measured out by Spring Valley. There should be 
a fixed charge on every tenement. If the tenant of a cheap flat, in 
malice to his landlord, allows the water to run to waste in a toilet, 
the water company would bring in a bill like all but confiscatory. 
What could the unlucky property owner do but pay up? Water 
must be had, and if the water company does not receive its demand 
it shuts off the supply. The water service of our city is profiteering 
tyranny, which Supervisors who desire to stand well with the public 



should fight. Supervisor McSheehy and Supervisor Schmitz, who 
have aspirations to fill the Mayor's chair, would do well to pay 
special attention to water propositions. 

Noble Graft in Olden Days 

Time was when civilized government was a matter of robbing the 
people to enrich the nobility. The King allowed his favorites to 
establish and enjoy fat monopolies. Several of the gallants who 
made love to Queen Elizabeth were given monopolies — the exclusive 
right to market salt, sugar, cotton, etc. The sovereign gave them 
whole counties, in which to locate their mansions and estates. Under 
the French Kings the people were serfs, who slaved and died so 
that the mistresses of the dynastic monarch might wear silks and 
satins and live in palaces. The world has somewhat changed that, 
but the money barons now grasp the humble citizen by the throat. 
The state makes a pretense of saving the strangling citizen from 
the profiteer, but it is only a pretense. What could be more remi- 
niscent of the barbarous extortions of the days of Queen Elizabeth 
or Louis XIV than the state's permitting money barons to collect 
rainwater, convey it in rusty old pipes, and sell it by gallon measure 
to a great city at rates which would not be excessively low for beer? 

Of course, such profiteers are entitled to receive fair interest on 
their investment — fair interest. Yes, but who ever heard of the 
Spring Valley Company being satisfied with 8 or 9 or even 10 per 
cent on an honest and correct valuation of the capital invested in 
their business? If Supervisors McSheehy and Schmitz, and other 
aspirants for Mayor, devote attention to the water profiteering, they 
will get much nearer to their goal. 

An Old, Old Story 

The announcement that the Key Route Railroad Company is 
about to ask permission of Congress to bridge San Francisco Bay, 
using Goat Island as one span, should not arouse expectations of 
rapid realization of the scheme. There has been talk of bridge con- 
nection with the east bay shore ever since the tide came up to the 
Montgomery street wharves and floating hotels of the pioneers. 
All kinds of real estate and other projects have been based on a 
bay bridge. The bridge does not seem much nearer. 

Fought Against Railroads 

The former owners of the Call and the Bulletin, who advocated 
the rights of the taxpaying class, were opposed to the use of Goat 
Island in any bridge project, as they feared it would be appro- 
priated by the Southern Pacific Company, and opposition to most 
railroad plans was part of the religion of the publishers of the two 
papers then issued by the same company. 

We have, in a large measure, got over the village idea of fighting 
railroad expansions. Railroad activity, properly directed, is vital to 
civic prosperity. The Key Route project is practically a revival of 
the plan outlined by Admiral L. Jayne, former commandant of the 
Twelfth Naval District. 

Boom for Upper Market Street 

Upper Market street is feeling the boom effect of becoming the 
theatrical center. Since the building of the Granada, rents have 
doubled in the block between Seventh and Eighth. The west corner 
of Marshal Square and Market street, opposite the Hotel Whitcomb, 
has been leased for $500 a month. It was $350. Just as Broadway 
improved rapidly, so will it be on upper Market street. 



February 18, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



II 



Commercial Aviation Hardup 

ALTHOUGH President Harding has expressed determination to 
do all possible for commercial aviation, it labors under serious 
handicaps. By far the greater part of the material in use is con- 
verted war material, built for extraordinary performance rather than 
economy. This material must in some way be worked off the market 
before new and better models can profitably be built. Traffic is light 
and variable and the uncertainty of its future volume and nature is 
a severe handicap. There are in addition many technical details, 
both in regard to material and organization, that appear to be of 
a minor character, but frequently turn out to be important to eco- 
nomical operation. Passport and customs regulations are still a 
restraint to international services. The fact that night flying is not 
yet commercially possible handicaps air transportation in competi- 
tion with other means of communication. 

Airplane costs are too high. The cost per airplane mile from 
London to Paris is estimated at 80 cents. The cost of transporting 
merchandise is slightly higher. The railroad rate per mile in England 
is 5 cents. The greatest handicap by far to further development of 
commercial aviation lies much deeper than present financial pros- 
pects of the industry. It is the continued lack of public confidence 
in the safety and reliability of air transportation. Flying has been 
handicapped from the beginning by having assumed the aspect of a 
dangerous sport in the public mind and the widespread publicity 
which accompanies every accident tends to deepen this unfortunate 
impression. 

Since the armistice accidents have been increasing in number in 
British commercial aviation. In the twenty-three months from May, 
1919, to March, 1921, inclusive, twenty persons were killed and 
twenty-one injured in a total of forty-eight accidents, or one acci- 
dent for every 33,200 miles flown. In the United States the number 
of casualties, both in military and civil flying, has been alarming, 
although it is not possible to determine the accident rate, as no 
official reports are required either of flights or accidents. 

Progress toward increased safety in flying has not been so great 
as that in developing speed, capacity and cruising radius. Motors 
are more powerful and to a considerable extent more reliable than 
before the war, but they are still subject to sudden failure, due 
usually to weakness of important accessories rather than that of 
the engine itself. Forced landings are frequent, and as yet no 
proper provision has been made in most countries for emergency 
landing fields on established air routes. 

CANCEL ALLIES' DEBT, SAYS JUSTICE CLARKE 

(Continued from Page 6) 

doing so. It is a matter of business, and the British have always 
been honorable in their dealings. 

After the great fire of 1906 in San Francisco the British insur- 
ance companies met their obligations. The Germans welched with 
great celerity and unanimity. 

Let us not be carried away by a wave of good fellowship bor- 
dering on Quixotic chivalry. The United States is not made of 
solid gold. Our debtors are worthy men and deserve considerate 
treatment from us, but they are alert to their rights. 

In the United States Senate the other day there was a hot debate 
over the question whether many millions — a very large sum due to 
Great Britain for the transportation of our troops across the Atlan- 
tic when the Allies were fighting with their backs to the wall — 
could not be deducted as interest on the unpaid war debt of eleven 
billions. It was shown that was a proper deduction, but it never 
was made. Is the treasury of the United States to become a grab- 
bag for the hardup nations of the earth? 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1922 




oabt 




Busy Cupid 

MR. AND MRS. WARREN QUINN an- 
nounce the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Cordelia Smith, to Mr. Har- 
old Snodg: ass. The news was told last week 
at a large tea given by Mrs. Prentis C. Hale 
and her daughter, Mrs. Edward Corbet, at 
their home in Vallejo street. The young 
couple met at the Hale home several months 
ago, so it was appropriate that the news of 
the engagement should be told there. Miss 
Smith is a New York girl, who, with her 
parents, has made her home in San Fran- 
cisco for the past year and a half. She is 
an unusually pretty girl and has become a 
great favorite during her short residence 
here. Miss Smith is a graduate of the Gard- 
ner School of New York and also of the 
Deverell French School of New York. She 
sings and plays charmingly. Mr. Snodgrass 
is a young San Franciscan, the son of Mrs. 
David Snodgrass and the late Mr. Snod- 
grass. 

— Invitations have been received from 
New York for the wedding of Miss Elizabeth 
Forrester La Boyteaux to Captain Edward 
Sanford Pegram Jr., U. S. A., on Saturday, 
February 25, at the Church of Heavenly 
Rest. Later there will be a reception at the 
home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
William H. La Boyteaux, at 320 Park ave- 
nue, New York. The bride is a San Fran- 
cisco girl, who with her parents and sister, 
Miss Mary Stewart La Boyteaux, went to 
New York to live several years ago. The 
family returned to California for the sum- 
mer at Del Monte every year after they left, 
until last summer, when they went to Eu- 
rope for the season, and visited Captain 
Pegram at Coblenz, where he was stationed 
with the Army of Occupation. 

— The wedding of Mrs. Cromwell Brooks 
and General Douglas MacArthur took place 
Tuesday at Palm Beach, Fla., and was the 
social event of the season. The ceremony 
was performed at the villa of the bride's 
mother, Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury, which 
is a very handsome residence recently com- 
pleted. The engagement of the couple was 
announced a few weeks ago and is quite as 
interesting here as in the East. The bride- 
groom is the son of the late General Arthur 
MacArthur, who for a number of years was 
commandant of the Army on this Coast, and 
his boyhood was spent here. The bride is 
also well known in San Francisco society 
and was much entertained here and at Bur- 
lingame during a long visit in 1915 with 
Mr. and Mrs. Stotesbury. 
Luncheons 

— Mrs. Edgar T. Zook and her sister, Miss 
Edith Slack, gave a luncheon last Friday at 
the Francisca Club and entertained Mrs. 



Walter Boardman, Mrs. Marshall Williams, 
Mrs. Horace B. Clifton, Mrs. Harold Mann 
and Miss Janet Coleman. 

— Mrs. Joseph M. Masten entertained at 
a handsome luncheon and bridge party at 
her home on Washington street Monday aft- 
ernoon. Baskets of fruit blossoms and spring 
flowers adorned the table. 

— Miss Mary Gorgas and Miss Edith Kyn- 
nersley entertained at luncheon Monday in 
honor of Miss Ola Willett, whose marriage 
to Lorn H. Tryon will take place this Sat- 
urday. Miss Willett will be attended by her 
two attractive sisters, Miss Barbara and Miss 
Audrey Willett. Marshall Campbell will be 
best man. 

— Complimenting Mrs. Harold Wilcox 
Beard (Roberta Belcher), a recent bride, 
Mrs. T. M. Dargie of Oakland entertained 
twenty of her friends at the Palace Hotel 
to meet Mrs. Beard. 

— Mr. Frank Fuller, who, with Mrs. Ful- 
ler, will leave for Europe this week, gave 
a luncheon on Friday at the Bohemian Club 
for a number of his men friends. 

— Mrs. John H. Van Home gave a lunch- 
eon Friday at the Hotel Whitcomb. Among 
her guests were Mrs. Charles Gibson, Mrs. 
Edwin Short, Mrs. Stanley Prior, Mrs. W. 
L. Girard and Mrs. William Manaton. 

— Mrs. Ernest Dwight Chipman enter- 
tained informally at luncheon at her apart- 
ments in town Tuesday to greet Mrs. Dun- 
can Frissell, formerly Miss Louise Porter, 
who has returned from her honeymoon. 

— Miss Margaret Olcese entertained a 
quartette of friends at luncheon on Tuesday 
in the Venetian room at The Fairmont. 
Teas 
— Miss Sara Wright presided at tea at 
her home on California street Saturday aft- 
ernoon. Miss Ola Willett was the guest of 
honor. 

— Miss Josephine Tynan entertained at a 
large tea at her home on Lyon street on 
Saturday afternoon, complimenting Miss 
Eileen Costello, who became the bride of 
Adolph B. Canelo Jr. Tuesday. Masses of 
fruit blossoms and spring flowers were used 
for decoration throughout the Tynan home. 
— Cards have been issued for a tea which 
Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley will give on the 
25 th of this month in honor of her house 
guest, Miss Marjory Smith of Spokane. 

Bridge 

— Mrs. George W. Starr gave an informal 
bridge party and tea Friday at the Town 
and Country Club to celebrate the birthday 
of her cousin, Mrs. James Ellis Tucker. 

— Mrs. J. Rupert Mason entertained at 
luncheon and bridge Tuesday afternoon in 
honor of Miss Ola Willett, fiancee of Lorin 
Howard Tryon. 



— Miss Bernice Mitchell entertained at 
bridge and tea at her home on Friday in 
honor of the Misses Dunne, who are leaving 
soon for Europe, and Miss Cordelia Smith, 
who has announced her engagement to Har- 
old Snodgrass. 

— Miss Dorothy Gebhardt was hostess at 
a delightful bridge breakfast at her home 
Tuesday, at which Miss Elvira Coburn was 
the honored guest. Miss Coburn and Law- 
rence Jordon are to be married in San Sal- 
vador in April. Spring blossoms and Valen- 
tine favors were used for table decoration. 

— Miss Cornelia Gwynn, one of the sea- 
son's brides-elect, was the complimented 
guest at a bridge tea at which Miss Helen 
Lichtenberg entertained at her home in town 
Tuesday. Miss Lichtenberg is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lichtenberg and 
a debutante of last winter. 

— Mrs. Mahlon Clayton Harrison enter- 
tained at a bridge luncheon on Tuesday aft- 
ernoon at the Fairmont. 
Dinners 

— Mr. and Mrs. James Potter Langhorne 
gave a dinner Saturday evening at their 
home in Pacific avenue. As a surprise to 
the hosts the guests appeared in fancy dress 
and a variety of clever costumes were worn. 

— Miss Elvira Coburn, who is to become 
the bride of Lawrence Jordon, was the com- 
plimented guest at a Valentine dinner-dance 
which Mr. and Mrs. Albert G. Lang gave 
in the Rose room at the Palace Hotel Men- 
day evening. 

— One of the brilliant social affairs of the 
month will be the dinner given by the Japan 
Society of America to Admiral Baron Kato 
and M. Hanihara of the Japanese Foreign 
Office on their arrival in this city from 
Washington, where they have been ranking 
delegates at the disarmament conference. 
Invitations to the affair, which will be held 
in the ballroom of the Fairmont the evening 
of February 20, have been sent out to the 
people well known in San Francisco social 
and business circles. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowrey enter- 
tained at a Valentine dinner at their home 
on Russian Hill Tuesday evening. Those 
who accepted their hospitality were Messrs: 




Experience it in 
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Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 



February 18, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



and Mesdames J. Frank Judge, Charles W. 
Clark, Roger Lapham, John Drum and Dr. 
and Mrs. Max Rothschild. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler Lee gave a pretty 
Valentine dinner at their home on Tuesday 
evening for a few of the friends of their 
debutante daughters. Miss Rosamonde and 
Miss Margaret Lee. 

Dances 

— In honor of Miss Ola Willett and Lorin 
Howard Tryon, who are to be married this 
Saturday, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Washington 
Dodge gave a dance last Saturday evening. 
The affair took place at the S. L. Braver- 
man home on Van Ness avenue. 

— The junior officers of the U. S. S. 
Pennsylvania gave a tea dance Saturday 
for some of the younger girls of society. 
Mrs. Cullen Welty chaperoned the party. 

— Miss Margaret Fuller, who with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Fuller, will 
soon leave for Europe, was the principal 
guest at a large dance given Saturday even- 
ing at the Woman's Athletic Club by Miss 
Jean McLaughlin, Miss Frances and Miss 
Marion Mace. 

— Society is pleasurably anticipating the 
tea dance to be given at the Fairmont on 
February 28, for the benefit of the Polish 
refugees in Siberia. Mme. Ignace Pade- 
rewski is coming up from Paso Robles to 
give her assistance in making this event a 
success. 

— The art students of the San Francisco 
Art Institute are giving all their spare time 
between now and February 28 to designing 
the decorations for the supper room for the 
carnival night of the Mardi Gras ball on 
February 28. Mrs. Andrew Welch, who is 
famed for her hospitality and who knows 
how to plan a menu, is in charge of the 
supper plans and tables. Many parties for 
supper have been made up, but as this fea- 
ture is separate from the regular admission 
ticket only those who make reservations in 
advance will have the pleasure of enjoying 
themselves here, as the capacity of the room 
is limited. 

— The dinner-dances at the Fairmont on 
Saturday evenings are increasing in popu- 
larity, and many gay parties are gathered 



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together at the big hostelry on the hill. The 
Sunday evening lobby concerts under the 
able leadership of the well known artist, 
Rudy Seiger, are a feature. 

— A committee composed of members of 
the San Mateo Polo Club gave a farewell 
dance at the Polo Club on Friday evening 
for Lord and Lady Rodney, who are re- 
turning to Canada next week after a season 
in California. 

— Seventy-five of the young bachelors of 
San Francisco society will give a ball on 
February 21 for the debutantes and other 
young girls who have entertained them. It 
will take place at the St. Francis and prom- 
ises to be an unusually delightful affair. 
In Town and Out 

— The Misses Vere de Vere, Schatze and 
Ernestine Adams sailed Tuesday from New 
York for the Mediterranean. They were 
chaperoned by Mrs. Eugene Davis, and will 
travel with her abroad for a year. 

— Mrs. Henry A. Whitley and Miss Ruth 
Whitley left Monday for New York. They 
will visit in the East for several months. 

— Miss Pearl Chase has returned to her 
home in Santa Barbara after a visit to Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler. She 
came North to attend a reunion of her col- 
lege sorority. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Piatt Kent have pur- 
chased an attractive home in San Mateo 
Park and they will move into it in March. 
Meanwhile the new domicile is undergoing 
extensive alterations and is being redeco- 
rated for their occupancy. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran have 
reopened their home in Burlingame after a 
year's absence. Since their arrival from 
Europe they have been visiting in Burlin- 
game with Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hays Smith 
and more recently at the Burlingame Coun- 
try Club. 

Intimations 

— Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch and their 
daughters, Miss Marie and Miss Florence 
Welch, will leave for Europe in June after 
Miss Marie is graduated from Miss Burke's 
school. The Misses Welch will enter school 
in Paris and their parents will remain in 
Europe for a year and a half to be near 
them. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Herman Phleger are be- 
ing congratulated on the birth of a daugh- 
ter, which occurred at the St. Francis Hos- 
pital on Friday. Mrs. Phleger was Miss 
Mary Elena Macondray. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Eddy, who are 
at their villa on the Riviera, have been 
entertaining the American ambassador to 
France, Mr. Myron T Herrick. and his son 
and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Parmely 
Herrick. The Eddys recently went to France 
from England, where their son is at school. 

Miss Mary Julia Crocker, daughter of 
Mrs. Henry J. Crocker, has decided to be- 
come a trained nurse and will soon enter 
Lane Hospital to take a three years' course. 
Miss Alice Requa will also enter the hospi- 
tal. The two girls were given a farewell 
dinner Thursday night by Miss Josephine 
and Miss Edith Grant at the Grant home 



on Broadway. The dinner was one of the 
most original given this winter. As a com- 
pliment to the two future nurses everyone 
was in the costumes of a hospital, and the 
table decorations carried out the same idea. 
The dinner was very gay, and later the 
party went to the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edson Adams for dancing. 

— Mr. Leroy Nickel, who was injured in 
an automobile accident Thursday night, is 
receiving much attention from his friends 
while he is at the hospital. He will probably 
be laid up for two or three weeks on ac- 
count of the injury to his knee. Mr. Nickel 
was also badly burned while trying to rescue 
the man who was burned to death from un- 
der the burning car. 

— Mrs. James Athearn Folger and Miss 
Jane Carrigan, who were to have sailed last 
Saturday for Europe to be gone indefinitely, 
changed their reservations at the last mo- 
ment and will not leave New York until this 
Saturday, when they will make the trip on 
the Adriatic. During their sojourn in the 
Eastern metropolis Mrs. Folger and Miss 
Carrigan have been extensively entertained. 
Mr. Will Carrigan, who maintains a studio 
in New York, was one who made their stay 
enjoyable. 

— Miss Marion Huntington and Mrs. Sally 
Devenport sailed last Saturday for Europe 
on the Empress of France. They will make 
a leisurely tour of Italy, France and Spain 
in the early summer. It is also probable 
that they will make a trip to Greece, re- 
serving Central Europe and the British Isles 
for their sojourn in the fall. 

— Mrs. Dorothy Chapman Foss, who spent 
part of the winter here with her brother, 
Mr. Sherwood Chapman, will sail for Europe 
next month. She is at the Ritz-Carlton in 
New York after a visit to Boston. 



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14 





SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

VI 



i^in^joal; 




By P. N. BERINGER 



FOLLOW MY LEADER is a favorite 
game with us. We follow the lead of 
men who own newspapers and who make 
these papers the means of disseminating 
their personal views for personal gain. Thus 
we have men who strive to make us under- 
stand that the Soviet Government of Russia 
is a failure ONLY because it is misunder- 
stood. These men know this is not true. 
We will take the subject of Soviet paper 
money. As long as any country, Russia, 
Germany or any other country, issues paper 
money that is backed by something that is 
only of little or no value, the fiat of gov- 
ernment doesn't give it any additional value, 
except as long as that government will re- 
deem this paper money with something that 
is worth its face value, when issued from 
the press. 

Printing unlimited supplies of paper 
money, to be used in time of emergency, is 
nothing new. At the time of emergency the 
paper brought its face value, but with the 
march of time the value of that money took 
on the value of whatever it stood a symbol 
for. 

Germany, like Russia, is sowing the seeds 
for a revolutionary whirlwind by the un- 
limited issue of paper marks. German labor 
is being paid with these paper marks and 
German capital is selling the product of this 
labor in the world's markets for gold. The 
old military gang has turned its mind to 
commercialism. But in Germany and in 
Russia, and in other lands where fairy 
money is being issued, there is sure to be a 
day of reckoning. It may come with an 
upset of government, or it may come with 
a long period of terrible privations for 
everyone. 

How many of my banker readers and 
those of the general public remember the 
history of the Rhode Island Paper Bank? 
This was in 1 786. Space limitations forbid 
a detailed history. The bank was established 
and it had a capital of £100,000. Every 
farmer who came to borrow money must 
pledge land for more than double the value 
of the loan. The money to be paid the peo- 
ple upon this pledge was based according 
to the apportionment of the last tax. It 
must be paid into the treasury at the end of 
fourteen years. 

Here was wealth, an easy means to a help 
in running the farm. From all parts of the 
state the farmers and others rushed to avail 
themselves of their good fortune. They 
mortgaged fields covered with stones and 
dotted over with dwarf cedar and stunted 



pine for sums such as could not have been 

obtained in times when the populace was 

not in an hysterical condition for the very 

best pasture lands. 

* * * 

Almost as soon as the money came into 
their hands began the depreciation. The 
money had lost face value as soon as it 
became a question of exchanging it for any 
of the necessities or the luxuries of life. The 
State Assembly sought to give the money 
value by statutory enactment. The penalty 
of not receiving this money at face value 
was a fine of £100 and the loss of all rights 
as freemen. And this law only made mat- 
ters worse. The merchants and those en- 
gaged in manufacturing refused to make 
any sales whatever, and many of them 
closed their shops. The barter of merchan- 
dise became the rule, rents were paid in 
grain and other commodities. The only peo- 
ple who used the money were those who had 

borrowed it on their land. 
» * * 

Next, the farmers refused to bring their 
produce to market. Additional legislation 
was obtained. In some places there was 
actual famine and what amounted almost 
to insurrection. The penalties provided were 
that anyone refusing to take this depreciated 
paper money was not entitled to jury trial. 
Three judges formed a quorum for a court, 
their decision was final, and the judgment 
should be instantly complied with on penalty 
of imprisonment. The fine, for the first of- 
fense, was from six to thirty pounds, and 
the second from ten to fifty pounds. 

However, this iniquitous law was shortly 
afterward declared unconstitutional. Then 
followed a long wrangle between the judi- 
ciary and the legislature, and the final re- 
pudiation of the state debt, in forced settle- 
ments, when the paper money which helpless 
creditors received was worth only one- 
twelfth as much as coin. In 1 787 one coin 
dollar was worth fifteen paper dollars. Much 
more that is interesting could be said on this 
subject, and it isn't by any means the only 
instance of government trying to give real 
value to money by statute. Innumerable 
attempts strew themselves along the path 
of history. 

v ¥ ¥ 

A river cannot rise higher than its source. 
Money is but a symbol of something else 
supposed to have the value the money rep- 
resents. We have mentioned the Rhode 
Island Paper Bank incident simply to point 
the moral in regard to the practice of the 
issuance of an unlimited supply of so-called 
"cheap money" by various governments 
during and since the war. 



February 18, 1922 

The Vanderlip plan of an international 
gold based currency is a practical thing, 
and, if such a currency were adopted, it 
would mean not only an immediate im- 
provement in the ranks of those engaged in 
world merchandising, but it would shortly 
have the effect of stabilizing all kinds of 
money values all over the world, whether 
used in export and import trade or used for 
interior national purposes. Money should 
have, in all lands at all times and in any 
transaction, a fixed and determined value 

as a purchasing agent. 

•t ~fc •(■ 

Insurance — Tuesday, John L. Schuff of 
Cincinnati, president of the National Asso- 
ciation of Life Associations, was at the Pal- 
ace, where he arrived on a grand swing 
around the circle. A sales congress was held 
at the Palace during the afternoon and 
evening. Last year National President Or- 
ville Thorpe held a sales congress at the 
Palace, which was a great success. 

Shipping — A great many people believe 
that because the big ship building plants of 
the metropolitan bay district are idle, or 
nearly idle, that it is a sign that ship build- 
ing on the Pacific Coast has seen its best 
day. That is not at all true, and the con- 
clusion is not built upon a sound founda- 
tion. When the figures are finally given out 
for the year 1922 it will be found to have 
been one of the best years that the ship 
builders have known, as far as San Fran- 
cisco is concerned. Ship building will go 
on, and it is only a question of a short time 
when the ways of the Moore and the Beth- 
lehem and other works will show a renewed 
activity in new building and in repairs. In 
the meanwhile, during the idle time, the 
managements have been rearranging their 
works so as to bring into play the greatest 
possible efficiency in management. 

George E. Billings is the owner of the 
S. S. Thomas Rolph, which is now at the 
Main Iron Works, China Basin, being 
equipped with 1 000-horsepower triple ex- 
pansion engines. She will have a steaming 
radius of twenty days and she will carry 
about 1 ,400,000 feet of lumber. 

The contract for the Diesel engines for 
the first of the boats of the Golden Gate 
Ferry Company is being filled by the Pacific 
Diesel Engine Company of San Francisco. 

General Items — The easiest task a writer 
is ever given is to be told to write on any 
subject in a humorous and malicious way. 
To be successful in this style of writing it 
is not at all necessary to stick very closely 
to facts. The malicious funny item, how- 
ever, is much more harmful than is anything 
that is written in a serious vein and, with 
the view of imparting useful knowledge 
founded on fact to the public. Just now 
every item writer with a funny bone is say- 
ing malicious things about France and her 
attitude toward Germany and toward the 
reparations program in general. The funny 
item writer is in a bad way, anyhow. The 
Japanese sorely disappointed him as a class 



February 18, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



because Japan's representatives behaved so 
very well at the Arms Conference. When 
the proceedings were over there were no 
projections about the Japanese upon which 
to hang a mean or insulting quip. 

$ jtt 9p 

France is the nation which will first suffer 
at the hands of a new and strong Germany. 
France needs to see to it that Germany pays 
her bills. And France must see to it that 
she is fully protected by the Allied powers, 
or, failing this, she must find within herself 
the means to protect herself. France still 
has a swath 400 miles long and from twenty 
to forty miles wide that must be rebuilt as 
to its houses, that must be made productive 
as to its fields and its factories. France has 
its miles and miles of cemeteries, reminders 
of the kind of treatment she may expect in 
the future from Germany. France has, in 
almost every home, a crippled man who is 
a living reminder of the Teuton menace. 
And if the crippled reminder is not there in 
the flesh, there is on the wall the pictures 
of a father and his sons, sacrified to the 
War God. And France remembers. And we 
should remember, too. 

¥ * * 

The funny man writes his malicious men- 
dacious paragraphs about France and Bel- 
gium and seeks to make trouble between 
Frenchmen and Britishers, and, in some in- 
stances, is successful in his attempt to poison 
the American mind. 

* * ¥ 

The whole world is interested in bringing 
about stable business conditions. It is of just 
as much importance to the Britisher, the 
Frenchman, the Italian, the Japanese and 
all of the others as it is to the American 
that harmonious conditions should exist be- 
tween all nations. The writer of the funny 
paragraph with a malicious twist is an aider 
and an abettor of discord, and he should 
be frowned down by all decent citizens. 



Money in Grain 

$12.50 buys guarantee option on 10.000 bushels 
of wheat or corn. No further risk. A movement 
of 5c from price gives you an opportunity to 
take $600; 4c. $400; 3c. $300. etc. Write for 
pailieiilafs ami free market letter. 

INVESTORS' DAILY OTJIDB 
Southwest Branch, Desk CO, 1004 Baltimore Ave. 

KilllxltM t'K.V. Mo. 



licst Cquipped and Most MODERN" 
OARAGE WoM of Chicago 

The Century 



T\\n BlOOkfl from Union SUUMU 

117.". Port SdiH't San Francisco, Calif. 
Between Taylor ami Jones 




THE sustained interest in the motor show 
at the Exposition Auditorium leaves no 
room for doubt that the motor car has a 
fixed place in the public mind as an indis- 
pensable necessity. The exhibits have dem- 
onstrated that the manufacturers are not 
only keeping step with the requirements of 
motorists, but are well in advance of ex- 
pectations. Never has there been a better 
show or one which has done more to estab- 
lish confidence of renewed activity in the 
motor market. 

It has been proved that the public was 
only waiting for a final adjustment of prices 
before placing their orders. Out of town 
automobile men from all over Northern Cali- 
fornia have visited the show in numbers, 
and all showed a keen interest in making 
good connections for the coming year. In- 
variably these men say the outlook for busi- 
ness in their own communities is exceedingly 
gratifying. So all in all, it seems as if the 
successful show here this year presages a 
prosperous 1922 for the automobile trade 
in Northern California. 



Accidents at Railroad Crossings 

An interesting feature of automobile acci- 
dents at railroad crossings is that in many 
cases the automobiles run into the sides of 
engines or cars, instead of being hit by the 
engine, as is the popular belief. 

In five accidents that occurred during 
January, one machine ran into the side of 
a train, two stalled on the track in front of 
approaching trains, and another skidded 
into the side of the train. In only one of 
these accidents did the machine succeed in 
running in front of the engine. 



The Used Car Business 

Today the automobile business is one of 
the best established and strongest in the 
United States. Manufacturing has advanced 
to a point where the motor car industry 
ranks as one of the leading industries of 
the world. The retailing of motor cars has 
kept step with the advance of manufactur- 
ing and the used car business is now as 
well established and recognized a part of 
the sales department as the selling of new- 
cars. Reputable firms recognize that the 
customer buying a used car or a rebuilt car 
is entitled to the same consideration and the 
same treatment as a man or woman who 
buys a new car. 

Firms that have recognized this and con- 
duct their business accordingly are finding 
the used car problem easy to solve and are 
building up a steadily growing business in 
this department. 



Pedigree — Stable-wise negroes were dis- 
cussing the pedigree of Man-of-War. "Say, 
Henery," asked one v "dis horse Man-of-War 
— who is she by?" "Ah dunno. Ebery time 
Ah sees her she is by herse'f." 



B> 




•74 



Repaints 

and 

Repairs 

All Makes of 
Motor Cars 



Van Ness 

at 

O'Farrell 



Authorized Simonizing Stations 




(Mir Painting: and Upholstering Depart- 
ment will tx furnish estimates 
i.n any work. 

If v.nir office or home furniture looka 
dull or diniry. send for a Simonizer. 

California Simonizing Co. 

Itnmdwiy 
Oakland 
Th. Oakland 9523 



1636 California Street 

S«n Franri»ro 
Ph. Prospect 3418-3419 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1922 




PIyE>ASURJE>'S WAND 



Alcazar 

The entire company is seen in action this 
week in "Cornered," the best crook play we 
have had presented us in a year. Gladys 
George plays a dual role with great success. 
Her work in the third act is of a very high 
order and we don't hesitate to extend her 
all the praise she deserves. 

There are parts in this play that are 
worked out to a fine point, and nothing il- 
logical has been introduced. Dudley Ayres 
and George Yule are Miss George's chief 
support, the former as the lover and Yule 
as the police inspector from headquarters. 
The settings are well conceived, the cast 
synchronized in a charming manner and 
nothing omitted to make this a credit to the 
Alcazar owners and company. It is hoped 
every patron will attend this week and be 
as satisfied as ourselves. 



Imperial 

Mae Murray at last is here for a two 
weeks' run in her much-heralded "Peacock 
Alley." A story of small-town America and 
musical Paris, this Metro picture gives a 
good idea of how much artistry can be in- 
jected into a purely imaginary film. 

Gorgeous costumes and not a little good 
acting are offered, together with an able 
cast. Enough pathos is mingled to tug the 
heart-strings, though the ending saves it 
from tragedy. 

Saslavsky and his little symphony are still 
in evidence, and an appropriate prologue 
introduces the feature. Short reels complete 
an abundant program. 



California 

While Tom Moore is billed as the lead, 
he has to give the honors to Harold Lloyd. 
Moore's comedy, a similar one to "Hold 
Your Horses," is very inferior in conception 
and execution. His reputation, fortunately, 
does not depend upon "From the Ground 

U P ." 

The Lloyd comedy, on the other hand, is 
full of laughs, well-filmed in most places 
and highly entertaining. 

Heller's orchestra plays "The Evolution 
of Dixie" as a tribute to Abraham Lincoln, 
and the Argentine dancers appear again in 
typical Spanish dances. Other short fea- 
tures are included in this week's program. 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

narrow American home is tellingly repro- 
duced, the characters are all well cast, and 
the most is made of every point in this un- 
usual story. Lois Wilson, Helen Ferguson, 
Theodore Roberts, Milton Sill and Taylor 
Graves lead the goodly company of actors 
and actresses who do remarkably good work 
in the play and add one more success to 
Granada's brilliant list. 

Music Week at Orpheum 

Any savage breasts among our readers? 
The Orpheum's music hath charms to soothe 
them; go get thee hence! Dave Harris, the 
chap who can play everything, and does, is 
supported by seven of the wildest jazzites 
on record. Together they have an unroar- 
ious twenty minutes, what with requests of 
the audience for this and that, and Dave's 
ready compliance, and his banjoist, saxa- 
phonist, drummer, cornetist, pianist, trom- 
bonist, all raising the dickens. The jazz 
enthusiasts were quite carried away with 
joy. Ben Bernie's act, also musical, is a 
quieter one, and very amusing at that. "A 
Dress Rehearsal" is a laughable burlesque 
that shows how the theatrical folk can en- 
joy a joke on themselves as well as another. 
It is very well done, the types broadly 
drawn but effective. The only attraction 
held from last week is that afforded by the 
Marx Brothers, and it repeats well, the fun 
being spontaneous and the dancing good. 
The Ward Brothers in "Penny Ante" have 
a turn at comic argument; their dancing 
and yodeling are better than their imitation 
of English "johnnies." Adams and Barnet 
are two charming and songful girls who re- 
ceive much applause for their pleasing ef- 
forts. The Nathane acrobats do some aston- 
ishing stunts, and Pallenberg's bears show 
clever training. 




Granada 

The story of "Miss Lulu Bett" in the 
reading did not suggest moving picture pos- 
sibilities. But verily, all's grist that comes 
to the movie mill, and in this case the 
author herself has had a hand in the filming 
to its great advantage. On the screen the 
dramatic spots in the tale are, of course, 
given the highlights. Surprising how strong 
they are! The sordid atmosphere of the 



Orpheum Next Week 

Claire Whitney and Robert Emmet Keane 
are headliners in next week's bill at the 
Orpheum. Their vehicle is a comedy, "The 
Gossiping Sex," a humorous dramatization 
of Mrs. Grundy. Tom Patricola and Irene 
Delroy will offer what is known in the ver- 
nacular of theatricals as a "sure-fire hit." 
La Bernice will demonstrate her right to the 
title of the "youngest American prima bal- 
lerina." Harry Howard's musical ponies and 
terriers will furnish a remarkable novelty. 
Boyce Combe will sing and chat in the way 
which has made him popular in England 
and America. Leo Flanders and Genevieve 
Butler will present an admirable singing and 
piano number. Leo Zarrell Duo will astonish 
in gymnastics. 



Alcazar Next Week 

"The Three Bears" is the title of a com- 
edy treat which Belasco & Mayer have in 



store for Alcazar patrons beginning with the 
matinee Sunday afternoon, February 19. It 
was written by Edward Childs Carpenter 
and produced with great success on Broad- 
way. It is bright and sparkling and con- 
tains a romance of tender heart interest. 
The play is woven around three — a doctor, 
a lawyer and a violinist, dubbed "the three 
bears" by a young girl whose welfare they 
undertake to sponsor. Gladys George will 
appear as the heroine of the piece, and her 
"bears" will be represented by Dudley 
Ayres, Charles Yule and Brady Kline. Ben 
Erway will be found cast in a character role 
and there are important parts also for Emily 
Pinter and Anne Berryman. The locale of 
the play is laid in a beautiful section of the 
Maine woods. 



Del Monte 

— The first important play of the season 
for the seaside links at Del Monte will be 
the third annual play for the gold vase. This 
trophy, which is recognized as the most val- 
uable and handsome of the season, goes to 
the player turning in the lowest gross score 
in the qualifying round. This will take place 
on March 1 7, with the match play rounds 
on the following two days. 

— The George Washington birthday golf 
tournament, which ranks among the features 
of the sport season, will get under way on 
Sunday with a qualifying round of eighteen 
holes. The next three days will be devoted 
to match play for flights of sixteen at handi- 
cap. On Wednesday, February 22, there 
will be an eighteen-hole medal handicap for 
women players. 

— The horse feature at Del Monte, which 
will attract attention and interest this month, 
will be the annual Pebble Beach paper chase 
on February 25. 



"A hammock looks something like a 
spider's web." 

"Yes,' sighed Mr. Browbeaten, "that's the 
way I got caught." — Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 



"r«E JJtsT W w Nrvv>ot*\v\.t 







oaily ES 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 2oc to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 

Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted In Dress Circle 
and Loges 



February 18, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



Price Recessions — Prices have been very 
gradually coming down, until about a month 
ago, when in many lines it seems as if the 
ebb had been reached. There is no doubt 
that in many other lines prices have still a 
somewhat tedious down trend to go, but 
that there will be any very great vertical 
tumble may be dismissed from the public 
mind. Business isn't normal as yet. Busi- 
ness, however, is much improved in condi- 
tion, and may be likened to a hopeful con- 
valescent dyspeptic who does not dare to 
trust himself with the food he likes and 
which he craves. Optimism is prevalent in 
the business world, but what is needed in 
connection with this optimism is business 
courage. 

Reports giving figures received last week 
place our export trade on the same basis 
as in 1915. Certainly some drop from the 
altitude of trade just before and immedi- 
ately after the armistice was signed. It isn't 
so much a drop in the quantity as it is a 
drop in the value of the commodities ex- 
ported from this country. 

Business men are expressing surprise that 
so much money is being invested just now 
in bonds and stocks. This is not an era of 
speculation. These stocks and bonds are 
bought for the return they bring to the 
buyer in interest. And why are people buy- 
ing securities of standard quality? The main 
reason is that bond and stock houses know 
the value of advertising and that they are 
advertising their wares, while others, who 
should know better, are curtailing their ad- 
vertising and, at the same time, lessening 
their sales. This is no time to save money 
on your advertising expenditures. This is a 
time to advertise, and not a time to crawl 
into a hole and pull the hole in after you. 



THE SISTINE CHOIR 

Definite plans have been started to bring 
the Pope's Sistine Choir of the Vatican in 
Rome to San Francisco and the Pacific 
Coast, next August, following a fourteen 
weeks' tour of the Antipodes, according to 
Mr. Frank W. Healy of this city. Mr. Healy 
has been commissioned by the Vatican rep- 
resentatives to secure the subscriptions of 
prominent San Franciscans and the leading 
music-lovers of this city to an underwriting 
fund of $45,000, which will cover twelve 
concerts on the Pacific Coast. 



Two farmers met on a country road, and 
pulled up their teams. 

"Si," said Josh. "I've got a mule with 
distemper. What did you give that one of 
yours when he had it?" 

"Turpentine. Giddapl" 

A week later they met again. 

"Say, Si, I gave my mule turpentine, and 
it killed him." 

"Killed mine, too. Giddapl"— The Peri- 
scope. 



AUTO SHOW IMPRESSIONS 

Any doubts of the stability of the motor 
business have been dissipated by the grati- 
fying success of the Pacific Auto Show in 
the Civic Auditorium. From first to last, the 
public interest has been intense. The motor 
came to stay twenty years ago, and has 
established itself all the more firmly ever 
since. There may be periods when the mar- 
ket is overstocked or buyers have a spell of 
economy, but speaking in general terms 
there never is a day when nine-tenths of 
the people do not want to own an auto or 
look longingly at any attractive new model 
on exhibition. 

This year's exhibition has presented many 
novelties in models and accessories. The 
manufacturers are doing everything possible 
to meet the expectations of the motorists. 
There is a noteworthy increase of closed-car 
types, and it is plain that the most popular 
style of car in San Francisco is to be of 
that order. Our climate is mild, but the 
variations of temperature make the closed 
car most suitable. The finishings and uphol- 
stery of these closed cars are remarkably 
fine. 

In the important matter of price it is evi- 
dent that the auto manufacturer and the 
car buyer have got very close. The days of 
large profits are gone. To be sold readily, 
cars have to be of reasonable price as well 
as of artistic design. The manufacturers are 
fulfilling their part of the contract well. 

It is a reasonable prediction that the 
spring trade will be more brisk than ever. 
The highways will soon be alive again with 
motorists. The horn of the touring car will 
awaken echoes in valley, woodland and 
mountain forest. The only difference will 
be that there will be more instead of less 
motorists. The automobile is a recognized 
necessity of the American home, whether it 
be a mansion of many rooms or a modest 
apartment of three. 



THE PLACE OF COMFORT 

On these rainy days there is a gratifying 
sense of comfort and luxury in luncheon at 
the Fairmont Hotel, two minutes from the 
heart of business and looking down on the 
city from its picturesque location. The serv- 
ice is always perfect at the Fairmont, and 
the menu admirable. 



Mrs. Golitely — "I hear that you are laying 
off all your pretty stenographers, Mr. Wad- 
dums." 

Mr. W. — "Yes, I'm canning peaches." 



v* i>ii, line Profwnts — T 

From :ii Mai Mieotljr 

1 Powell Btr 



NOVEL POLISH BENEFIT AT FAIRMONT 

The Polish tea-dansant on Saturday aft- 
ernoon, February 25, at the Fairmont Hotel 
promises to be an affair delight as well as 
novel. Society is taking much interest in 
the project, which is to assist destitute chil- 
dren of Poland who have been stranded in 
Siberia. The Polish Relief Society of San 
Francisco will conduct this benefit affair at 
the Fairmont. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ignace Jan Paderewski will 
come from their home in Paso Robles to 
participate. The French consul-general, M. 
Julien Neltner, and the Belgian representa- 
tive, M. Simon, as well as the Japanese 
consul-general, S. Yada, are also giving their 
best assistance. A number of philanthropic 
society women have volunteered their co- 
operation. 

Between the dances at the Fairmont there 
will be solo numbers by artists of renown. 
Mile. Valdeo, a young Polish danseuse, who 
studied in Paris and who appeared with 
Pavlowa's Russian ballet in Paris in various 
operas, will give an exhibition of her art. 
Mrs. Agnes Caiman Rush, who was identi- 
fied with the Noyes School of Rhythmic 
Dancing in New York, will direct a dainty 
costumed troupe of children in interpreta- 
tive dancing. Miss Dorothy Manners Driefus 
of New York will do a dance called "bub- 
bles," releasing during her exhibition nuiny 
small toy balloons. 

Many tables have been taken by promi- 
nent society people. Mrs. George McGowan 
will have a dozen or more guests. Mrs. 
Richard McCreery will entertain, as will 
Mrs. Robert Hayes Smith, Mrs. Stewart 
Lowry, Mrs. Walter G. Filer and Mrs. Roger 
Bocqueraz. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-149S Market sn.-.i 

BrtwMl Kritnklin (mil (■nuKll 
T>!ephon«- Park 2'. 1 



Usually the fiddler is paid by someone 
who didn't dance at all. — Nashville Tennes- 




Cameo 



Order i i'i inn, ton — more 01 — PKACOCB 

( \i \ <>i 

i i Mr • : _ i go, etter for rtOYi 

dollar less. Try both. 

CALIFORNIA CLIMATI i i i; n \ v and night. 

\MI(i ( MI hi; I DO < <» \1 
Dl VLER 

know ft bart Buildinp where to find . ■ ALI-EN'. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1922 



Orders Am Orders — Hiking through the 
small French town an ignorant chicken, un- 
versed in the appetites of American darkies, 
crossed the road in front of a colored de- 
tachment. With much zeal a soldier broke 
forth from the ranks and set out in pursuit. 

"Halt!"! bellowed the officer in charge. 
Both fowl and negro only accelerated their 
paces. 

"Halt! Halt!" repeated the officer. 

The du'-ky doughboy made one plunge, 
grasped the chicken by the neck and stuffed 
it, still struggling, inside his shirt. 

"Here!" he panted. "Ah'll learn you to 
halt when de captain says halt, yo' dis'- 
bedient bird." — Pennsylvania Searchlight. 



"Mother — " 

"Yes, Ethel—" 

"Will you do something for me?" 

"What is it?" 

"I wish you would buy me a rolling pin." 

"Why don't you buy one yourself?" 

"Oh, you know Jim and I have only been 
married a few weeks, and the store man 
might think we were not getting along to- 
gether." — Youngstown Telegram. 



When the Widow Mingus came into Andy 
White's store for her weekly supply of gro- 
ceries the front of her dress was disfigured 
with splotchy bars of red paint. 

"How did you ever come to get that, Mrs. 
Mingus?" asked Mr. White. 

"I was leaning over that Sandy Bevan's 
fence to look at a hog," angrily answered 
the widow. 

"But Sandy has a big sign up," put in 
Deacon Petty, "Wet Paint — Sandy Bevan." 

"I saw that," snapped the widow, "but 
everybody knows what a liar he is." — To- 
ronto World. 



Ted — "Things are gradually getting back 
to normal." 

Ned — "There's no doubt of it. The wait- 
ers once more thank you for a quarter tip." 
— Detroit Free Press. 



His Interpretation — Kenneth, age 5, was 
playing in the back yard with his particular 
girl friend. The door opened, and his mother 
called cheerily: 

"Come, my boy, I want you to come now 
and take a bath." 

"A bath?" questioned the lad in dismay. 
"Not a bath in the tub, mother!" 

"Yes, Kenneth," was the firm answer, "a 
bath in the tub — all over." 

And the next-door neighbor felt as though 
he had stolen one of the family secrets when 
he heard a boyish voice ring out: "All over? 
Where are we going?" 



Ho 



Clever Observer — "Why, Bob Smith ! 
dare you pass me up on the street?" 

"Oh, I beg your pardon, Milly. You have 
a new pair of shoes and I didn't recognize 
you." — Chicago Phoenix. 



How to Keep Them — Mother: "How on 
earth do you expect to keep your friends if 
you are never ready when they call for 
you?" 

Daughter: "Waiting." 



Next Time We'll Be Careful — Soft moon- 
light on the lake. Soft, pale, glimmering 
moonlight — and the water was dark and 
black and deep and mysterious. 

Only two were in the canoe and the pad- 
dles were not in use, so that we had our 
arms free for other purposes. * * * And, 
being young and hardy and free and foolish, 
we used them. * * * Suddenly a motorboat 
appeared. We started to paddle, and tried 
to appear nonchalant * * * but it was no 
use; we were caught and fined and severely 
reprimanded * * * for fishing at night. — 
Pennsylvania Punch Bowl. 



Bibb — "Every gentleman ought to pay his 
debts." 

Babb — "Of course; if you'll let me have 
a little money I'll go straight to my tailor's." 
— Town Topics. 



Motorist — "Say, where can I get some re- 
pairs made? I've met with an accident." 

Farmer — "What d'ye want, a machine 
shop or a hospital?" — Boston Transcript. 



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JOHN LACOSTE HENRY SAXI. H. B. GUERNSEY ARTHl'R F. PRICE . : . 

President Supt. and Chemist Analyst and Soil Expert Consulting Chemist .;. 

PIERRE BAREILLES, Secretary-Treasurer * 



California Fertilizer Works 

Manufacturers of 

Complete Fertilizers 
Bone Meal, Etc. 

44 4 PINE STREET 

CALIFORNIA MARKET ltLDG. 

Phone Douglas 3745 



Branch Office: 216 Grosse Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



SAX FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



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BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

IAJNCHEON 75c 
Served Daily — 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large 

menu, which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

FRENCH DINNER $1.50 

Including tax. week days and Sundays, 

5 to 9 p. m. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH STREET, ABOVE KEARNY 

Phone: Douglas 2411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 
65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Ketirny 4. r >3fl Sun Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. LeidesdorfT 



Quality 1 806-56 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burllngame Redwood City Menlo Park 

Sun Mateo Woodxlde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone Sun Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
tu people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Eyes 

Bother 

You? 



oo 



Guaranteed 

Work at 

27 7th St. 



DR. J. P. JUHL 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



^**********^*******^^ 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECLVLTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



TECHAU TAVERN ANNOUNCES A 
TEMPORARY CLOSE-DOWN 

The days of one of the most famous of 
San Francisco's establishments are nearing 
an end. Techau Tavern has announced a 
temporary close-down for the purpose of 
altering the premises to meet the require- 
ments of the general demand for a moder- 
ately priced and centrally located restaurant. 
There will be many who will remember gay 
and wonderful times at this famous cafe. 
Its dance floor is one of the finest in San 
Francisco. Its commodious spaces, its beau- 
tiful decorations, its unexcelled service — all 
these have lent a charm to Techau Tavern 
that has never been equalled in this city. 
But alas! another famous landmark passes. 



MUSEUM OF ART PRIVATE RECEPTION 

The private view and reception to be 
given by the San Francisco Museum of Art 
in co-operation with the Japan Society of 
America in connection with the opening of 
the exhibition of modern Japanese paintings 
in the Palace of Fine Arts, Friday, Feb- 
ruary 24, will be exclusively for the museum 
members and the members of the Japan 
Society of America. A reception committee 
composed of prominent people headed by 
the presidents of the Museum and of the 
Japan Society, toge'her wi h Madam and 
Consul-General Yada, will be in charge of 
the occasion. 

The exhibition will open to the public on 
Saturday, February 25, and will continue 
for a period of one month thereafter. The 
museum in the Palace of Fine Arts is open 
free to the public from 10 to 5 o'clock 
every day, including Sundays. 



Backed by the Japanese Government, 
Baron Matsukata is planning to build in 
Tokyo a museum larger than the Louvre in 
Paris, at a cost of several hundred million 
dollars, to be devoted exclusively to the 
choicest examples obtainable of Occidental 
and Oriental art. 



The son of a well-known physician loves 
to "play doctor." The little fellow makes 
the round of neighboring houses, inquiring 
as to the health of the inmates. Usually he 
has with him an assortment of dolls — his 
"patients" in lieu of larger ones. 

Recently he called at a home and asked, 
"Anybody sick here?" 

He was answered in the negative. 

"Oh, well," he said, with professional 
nonchalance, producing two of his dolls, 
"guess I'll leave a couple of babies, any- 
way!" — Harper's Magazine. 



"I can't find any old clothes for my 
scarecrow," said the farmer. 

"Use some of the fancy thinge the boy 
brought home from college," replied his 
wife. 

"I'm trying to scare crows, not make them 
laugh." 

It never does a smile any damage to crack 
it. — Baltimore Evening Sun. 



Thomas Day Company 

FIRE did NOT damage our 
Factory or Office or Warehouse 

Tuesday we opened as usual and will complete 
all orders on time 

Temporary Salesroom 
715 Mission Street, Second Floor 



Ban 


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Coarfeous-lv Serves' if? pairon? ra'ti <$ood FoocL 
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Phones: Sutter S10!>, Kearny 41)78 

United Flower & Supply Co.,lnc. 

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1865 
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COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
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AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 31st 
March, 1921 




.$ 24,826,000.00 
. 17,125,000.00 

. 24.S26.000.00 



$ 66,777,000.00 



$37S.462,443.00 

OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

358 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 



DECEMBER 31st, 1921 



Assets - 

Deposits - 

Capital Actually Paid Up - 
Reserve and Contingent Funds 
Employees' Pension Fund - 



$ 71,851,299.62 

68,201,299.62 

1,000,000.00 

2,650,000.00 

371,753.46 



A Dividend of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4U ) per cent per annum was 
declared for the six months ending December 31, 1921. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansorae Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSOX 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



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BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin !> 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
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Luncheon (11:80 to 2 p. m.)—- 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays..$1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

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"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 



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TAX PAYERS WEEKLY 

SAN FRANCISCO SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1922 LOS ANGELES 





Early San Francisco — No. 1 

Entrance to Warren's old Cobweb Palace, Meigg's Wharf, Showing 
Part of the Menagerie. 




RESPONSIBILITY 

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this single responsi- 
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t standard, there- 
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service. 

Booklet "DN" on 

Memorials sent on 

request 



Raymond Granite Company, Inc. 

CONTRACTORS 

GRANITE — STONE — BUILDING — MEMORIAL 

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INSURANCE 

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LONDON & LANCASHIRE INDEMNITY COMPANY of America 

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GEO. ORMOND SMITH, Manager 



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Devoted to the Leading Interests of. California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL.-XCX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1922 



No. 8 



THE SAX FRAXCISCO XEWS LETTER AXD CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., iVist Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Ceorge Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. .C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $0.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— Cantu is said to be back of the new Mexico "unrest," say the 
newspapers^ Some politicians must be back of it. The people are not. 

— For the poor, maimed and neglected veterans, every cent Uncle 
Sam can afford; but no bonus for husky young warriors earning 
good livings. 

— State Dry Chief E. Forrest Mitchell is to quit. A fine thing if 

they would all quit, and not mix public government with narrow 

fanaticism. 

¥ ¥ * 

— Twelve hundred per cent increase of drugs in the last two 

years. Five thousand per cent, perhaps, in the next two, if so-called 

prohibition be kept up. 

* * * 

— Still the recognition of Mexico is withheld and both Republics 
injured. As a prominent Mexican recently said, "All Mexican poli- 
tics smell of oil." 

— Seeing that the annual murder record in the United States is 
15,000, aren't the newspapers working overtime on the single shoot- 
ing of a movie director in Los Angeles? 

— Congressman Julius Kahn is strong against the soldiers' bonus. 
Julius has a good head and uses it for the good of his constituents. 
Would that Congress was full of Julius Kahns. 

— Policeman assaults Realtor Wertheimer when testifying before 
Police Board. No policeman ever did such a trick in the days be- 
fore cops were put under "civil service" selection. 

— Federal Reserve Board tells Congress: "The swing of the pen- 
dulum points to immediate resumption of good business, and pros- 
perity will continue long." Can't be loo long to suit us all. 

— Fifty years ago it was proposed to cede Goat Island, as now 
proposed. But anti-crusaders objected. How many years San Fran- 
cisco has been held by the demagogues and cranks! 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Hearst's signed proclamation that a third party man. heading 
the host of dissatisfied Republicans and Democrats, is getting ready 
to move into the White House as soon as the present lease expires, 
is notice thai his li.it is in (he ring. It will be kicked out as before. 



— We are to have open advocacy of a ship subsidy in Congress 
after socialistic operation of Government-owned merchants ships has 
proved such a colossal failure. We grow wiser as we grow older. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 
— The bonus bill, it is announced, will be ready in ten days, and 
it might be further announced that the American people will not 
escape from the load it intends to lay on them for a generation. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The British House of Commons has ratified its agreement on 
the Irish Free State boundary line by a vote of 302 to 60. The 
British are not always looking for a chance to slip something over, 
Brother Hearst. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Did the late A. P. Hotaling, upright merchant in his busy life- 
time, when buying much fine property, including the "Coney Island" 
ocean beach, ever have a premonition that family law suits would 
scatter his millions? 

— Several "rejected lovers" have killed themselves in the past 
month. Poor fellows! One year of paying high rents and living 
expenses for their Juliets would have cured them, and given them 
long lives, min,us romance. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 
— Instead of paying soldiers a bonus — that is, well and hearty 
soldiers — they should really be taxed for the good their military 
training was to them and the educational benefit they received by 
their voyage to foreign lands. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The right way to treat apostles of birth control is not the way 
the press is treating them — with pictures and long reports, as if 
they were anything but new blisters on the ruffled and spotted and 
unhealthy skin of the body politic. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The jealous guardians of the people's interests in the United 
States Senate will clarify the Pacific peace treaties, it is announced. 
The trouble with the professional friends of the people is that the 
treaties are already far too clear for them. Clearness is the last 
thing they want. 

— La Follette is raging in the Senate against the "vandals of 
privilege" who have "battered down the safeguards of the people's 
liberties." The fiery Senator should not forget that he and the 
Sailors' Union, under who? — , have battered down the Amer- 
ican Merchant Marine. How about that kind of battering. Senator? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The local feminists and the National League of Women Voters 
are out of harmony on hurrying action on the proposed Twentieth 
Amendment giving women full equality in citizenship. What do 
these professional feminists want, anyway? They now have more 
than equality, without doing fighting or full jury duty — which they 
naturally dodge. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 25, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




It has been the proud and confident declara- 
Labor a Commodity tion of local labor leaders that labor is not 
like any human commodity, and is not af- 
fected by the great economic law of supply and demand. "God 
forbid the day will ever come in San Francisco," proclaimed a 
Building Trades official on a memorable occasion, "when supply 
and demand will regulate wages." 

But supply and demand are having a powerful effect on wages 
all over the world. The great economic law is asserting itself, as it 
does in all lands and at all times. Temporarily some combination 
may avert the influence of economic laws, but sooner or later they 
sweep down all barriers. 

The English farm laborer is feeling the effects of supply and 
demand, and complains that the Government does not preserve the 
workers' "Wage Boards," "Conciliation Boards," "Charter of Lib- 
erties Boards," and other protections of those who exchange their 
daily toil for wages to buy bread. 

Wages of agricultural workers are dropping gradually in England. 
Not long ago the average wage was $10 a week. Now it has gone 
down to $8 a week, and the employing farmers are expecting even 
greater reductions. "It is not enough for a man to raise a family," 
declare the unlucky workers, and ho doubt they are right. But in 
this world no living thing has a vested right to expect that heaven 
will find it a living, much less a good one. Everything that lives 
on the face of the earth, or in the waters under the earth, must 
prove equal to the struggle for life under the conditions presented, 
or succumb. It is a hard rule of Nature, but she has no special 
favorites. The same laws apply to man as to all the animal world, 
and woe betide those who disobey them. "By the sweat of thy blow 
ye shall earn thy daily bread." 

In preparation to stop the onrush of Germany, the British Gov- 
ernment was ready to offer any inducements to stir the loyalty of 
the agricultural workers, so that food supplies might be certain. The 
farm workers' pay was raised. The farmer got special prices for 
his produce. All kinds of altruistic schemes were devised to rob 
farm toil of its dreariness. The golden age of labor seemed to have 
been ushered in. But the greatness and glory of war have faded, 
and it has become once more a hard grind to extract a living from 
the soil. The great economic law of supply and demand is again 
in full and inexorable operation. It regulates the wages of the farm 
laborer, as it does the price of any commodity. The "Conciliation 
Boards," the "Wage Boards" and the "Charter of Liberties" have 
melted and gone like the snows of yesteryear. So it ever will be. 
Instead of being misled by the siren voice of labor leaders, who 
want to be elected to public office, honest laborers must think for 
themselves. Their only safe course is to be industrious and saving, 
rendering an honest day's work for a fair day's pay, and never 
forgetting that rainy days come in all lines of endeavor. The laborer 
is worthy of his hire, and he generally gets it if the employer is 
making enough to pay the bills. 



While Mrs. Margaret Sanger, of the Brit- 
Opposing Birth Control ish Birth Control League, is settling her 

differences, or trying to settle them, with 
the Japanese officials, who think that Japan is not quite ready to 
assimilate her theories and will not vise her passport, it is inter- 
esting to note that France, a nation of falling birth-rate, is trying 
to alter that condition. 

The French population has dropped to thirty millions, which is 



about one-half that of Germany. France believes she cannot afford 
to let her citizenship drop any more, and is offering a premium on 
larger families. 

There has been formed a nation-wide employers' association, tak- 
ing in every branch of large scale productive industry in the coun- 
try. This association has a fund to which each one of its members 
contributes in proportion to the number of his employes, and out 
of this fund is paid a sort of "marriage bonus" and "child bonus" 
— that is, every married man receives on the average 2 francs a 
day in addition to his wages and 2 francs a day for every child. 

The average day wage of the French working man is 20 francs, 
and this bonus for marriage amounts to a 10 per cent increase of 
the average laborer's income. 



Federal Judge Landis has resigned, 
Resignation of Judge Landis and thereby partially atoned for 

having disgraced the high place he 
occupied by accepting the position of "baseball commissioner" at 
a salary of $50,000. A determined effort was made to have him 
removed. It is a pity that such action was not automatically taken 
when he degraded the Federal bench. 

The one thing which saves our democracy from governmental 
chaos is the Federal bench. Any attempt to degrade it to the level 
occupied by the judicial bench in the states is a high crime against 
the commonwealth. In a large measure the Federal bench is kept 
aloof from politics, and to that fact is due the superiority of the 
United States courts. In the states, judicial positions are little more 
than the prizes of small politics. Hence the deterioration of justice, 
as evidenced in the recent showing in Congress that more men and 
women have been lynched in twenty years than were formally exe- 
cuted by order of our regular courts. That fact and the other awful 
indictment that the annual murder record of the United States is 
15,000, indicates the general contempt of the laws. 

Judge Landis has been a type of political judge, who gained his 
notoriety more by tickling the ears of the gallery than impressing 
thoughtful people with his profound scholarship and sound wisdom. 
Professions of human interest from the bench and fiery champion- 
ship of the proletariat have been his political stock in trade. Both 
are most admirable characteristics, when sincere and timely, and 
judicious. But they require sincerity and timeliness. 

In accepting the position of "baseball commissioner" at $50,000 
a year, Justice Landis was neither fair to the people, who paid him 
a judicial salary on the Federal bench, nor to the sporting syndicate 
which proffered more than six times as much. Now, he resigns his 
judgeship, giving the reason that serving two masters is beyond his 
physical powers. The attempt to do it ought to have been beyond 
his conscientious consideration. 

The fact that a Federal judge should not realize that the im- 
pressing of him into service as the factotum of professional base- 
ball, already tainted with admitted crookedness, was an insult to 
him, shows how woefully our standards are mixed. We need some 
class to set a higher standard of citizenship. What class can estab- 
lish such a standard? Our judiciary should set the example. 

The boast of a democracy is that it has no superior class. "One 
man is as good as another, and a blame sight better," is the exalted 
motto. So we go from bad to worse, setting up standards and idols, 
and smashing them as soon as erected. It could not be different. 
The idols are bogus, and only need be placed under the spotlight 
to detect all their unsightly bumps and structural misfits. 



February 25, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



Why not make the judicial class serve as a standard of public 
and private citizenship? We cannot have a standard of wealth, for 
as often as not it is ignorant and vulgar, and usually in three gen- 
erations returns to the ancestral overalls. 

The accepted standard of public and private citizenship must be 
set by our judiciary, who administer the laws, and whose elevation 
to public respect, or degradation to the status of the co-partners in 
corrupt politics, marks the progress of government to secure levels 
or presages its decay and destruction. 

Fortunately, Judge Landises on the Federal bench are rare. May 
they never become more numerous. They will not, if we appoint 
educated, well-trained men to the judiciary, and make it harder for 
superficial politicians to wear the ermine. 



seem to become embedded in the entire political and governmental 
superstructure, so that it appears impossible to remove them unless 
the whole Government structure is successfully challenged." 



The cry of our so-called "conservative" 
Make Parties Responsible men in Congress is that economy must 
be the watchword. "But democratic 
government does not know what reforms and economies are," cried 
Senator King of Utah, the other day in the United States Senate. 
"With all the boasted improvements of the budget organization, 
there would be wasted this year between four and five hundred 
millions of dollars," the Utah Senator asserted. "We have yielded 
too much to the importunities of executive officers," he said, "and 
we will continue appropriating these millions and billions — hundreds 
of millions — which ought not to have been appropriated." 

All of which is fine stuff to put in the Congressional Record, so 
that if the Utah Senator should run again he and others can point 
to the record and prove they were opposed to extravagance in 
public life. But because a national lawmaker denounces extrava- 
gance and then probably votes for extravagant outlays, he should 
not be allowed to pose as an enemy of extravagance. The innocent 
should suffer with the guilty, and that is the great reason why party 
politics is essential to our democratic form. In party politics the 
blame can be placed on somebody, but in the non-partisan fashion 
of recent years, with great laxity in party desertion, there is perfect 
immunity for shifty demagogues. 

"Until the people themselves, groaning beneath the burdens, will, 
with irresistible demand, compel us to work the economies and re- 
forms, we shall continue appropriating those millions and billions," 
said Senator King. 

But what can the people do now to be more emphatic in their 
demands, except to start a revolution, which would make matters 
worse for everybody? In what voice of thunder shall the angry 
taxpayers speak so that the men they send to Congress shall stop 
their disobedience in the willful waste of the public money? 

The short and the long of it is, that we must get back as soon 
at possible to party politics, and hold parties responsible for ill- 
administration of the government. The evil of non-partisanship 
which puts a premium on demagoguery exists in Federal and State, 
as well as in Municipal Government. Let us relapse to the old 
style, seeing that the new style is so much worse and keeps drifting 
steadily towards chaos. 



Before the ink is dry on the dis- 
Impossible to Abolish Bureaus armament treaties a tremendous 

campaign is begun to save the 
navy yards and keep them active, though in so doing millions will 
be spent. So United States Senator King of Utah has declared in 
the Senate. He said: 

"It has been observed to those familiar with governmental activi- 
ties that it is easy to create commissions and governmental agencies 
and increase the number of bureaus and employes of the Govern- 
ment, but it is an impossible task to abolish commissions and Fed- 
eral agencies and Federal works and shops and enterprises and to 
decrease the employes of the Government. When a commission is 
fastened upon the Government, or when positions are created, they 



The proposal to buy the lines 
Purchase of Market Street Lines of the Market Street Railway 

Company will take a long step 
towards popular decision this week, as the proper city officials and 
the attorneys of the private corporation meet for discussion of 
terms. There should be little difficulty in reaching an agreement on 
those. The value of the Market Street properties can easily be de- 
termined by engineering experts. Of course it would not be so easy 
to arrive at a correct estimate, if the owners of the properties were 
standing out for fancy prices, or the city were determined to get 
the lines for next to nothing. No such contingency is possible. 

It has long been made very clear to everybody that private rail- 
road lines cannot continue to do business in San Francisco while 
the policy of the municipality is to put public ownership into full 
force and effect. Municipal lines are not dependent on their re- 
ceipts, for deficits can be made up on the annual tax rate. With 
private corporations there must not be deficits, for bankruptcy 
would ensue. 

Seeing that competition of private railroads and municipal lines 
in San Francisco is out of the question, the owners of the private 
lines would be very unwise did they not wish to offer their prop- 
erties for sale and part with them on reasonable terms. 

The great question is whether the people should buy the private 
lines, now, on easy and attractive terms, or wait until the franchises 
expire and take over the roads. The latter would appear to be a 
most unfortunate decision of the people. There are many years yet 
of life for the private franchises, and nearly all the lines run on 
streets that are vital in the transportation problems of the city. 
These lines, like all railroads, require constant attention. Roadbeds 
carrying the heavy cars now used on all street lines wear out rap- 
idly, and twice as fast if constant attention be relaxed. One can 
easily imagine what the condition of the private lines in San Fran- 
cisco would be were all repair work suspended on them until the 
franchises expire and the city would take them over. The city 
would have very little to take. The restoration of the properties 
would be a great and a costly job for the taxpayers. 

In the past year alone the Market Street Railway Company has 
expended large sums on its lines. Some of the important roads 
have been in a large measure practically rebuilt. The Valencia 
line, a long and important one, has been improved from end to end. 

Another feature of the purchase of the private lines by the city 
would be the prevention of unwise and costly parallel lines by the 
municipality. Under the amended charter, the Supervisors have 
great powers to proceed with street improvements, and ambitious 
politicians are always clamoring for costly extensions in suburban 
districts where railroads cannot pay. Opening up of the Sunset 
district, a large and necessary project, could be accomplished more 
economically by consolidation of the existing private lines with 
municipal railroad plans. 

Whatever plan be agreed on for purchase of the Market Street 
Railway lines, it should be decided at once. Delay would be only 
waste of large sums for the taxpayers, injury to the development 
of our city. It is to be hoped that the Supervisors will act wisely 
in the matter. 



"General" Jacob S. Cox, who led an 
Cox Wakes from the Dead army of unemployed to Washington 

forty years ago, has arisen from seclu- 
sion with a proposal to Congress to buy and operate ships. He is 
now located at Massillon, Ohio. Several of his aides in the Coxey 
Army were San Francisco politicians. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 25, 1922 






F^DMfeMoe aod Its Costs 



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INTERESTING comparisons of the cost of enforcing prohibition 
with the expenditures of various established governmental func- 
tions were made in the House of Representatives by Representative 
Gallivan on February 9. His speech appears in the Congressional 
Record of Feb uary 1 0. 

The Prohibition Commissioner, Gallivan said, had asked $10,- 
000,000 "to present to the Department of Justice cases to investi- 
gate and determine whether there is cause for prosecution. Like 
the old woman gossip, his function is to make trouble for the 
people and work for the Department of Justice. It is a good illus- 
tration that it costs more to interfere with other people's business 
than it does to attend to your own business." 

Congress has appropriated $9,250,000 for the "Prohibition Unit," 
as Representative Gallivan called it. "Having no legitimate func- 
tions of its own, it has no other way of spending its appropriation 
than by interfering with the duties and responsibilities of other 
officers, Federal, state and municipal, and, as is generally the case 
with meddling, its activities have no limit and its agents no respon- 
sibilities to the law. It is simply a band of mischief makers, and it 
has been evident from the beginning that it is entirely foreign to 
our Federal policies." 

Last year the prohibition unit obtained an appropriation of 
$792,340. This fiscal year the Prohibition Commissioner received 
$6,000,000, and came back with a deficiency demand and got it, 
making his total appropriation $7,500,000. Now Congress has given 
him $9,250,000 for prohibition enforcement in 1923, and Repre- 
sentative Gallivan predicts there will be another deficiency bill and 
the prohibition czar. 

The pay roll of the Prohibition Unit amounted last year to 
$792,340, and now has swelled to several millions. The Prohibition 
Commissioner estimates his force at 3674, "and can only estimate 
it," he is adding new reformers so fast, declared Gallivan. 

"He has here in Washington himself at $7500, an assistant com- 
missioner at $5000, a counsel at $5000, assistant counsel at $4500, 
and a special counsel at $4200, making a total of $26,000 for chief 
administrators and counsel, not to mention their stenographers, 
clerks, janitors, and so forth. Then he has fifty-one state directors 
at from $3000 to $5000 — and I will bet a red apple that the ma- 
jority get the limit of $5000— making a total of $250,000 for 
directors; fifteen assistant directors at from $2500 to $3500, or 
$50,000 for assistant directors; thirty-six 'field administrators at 
from $3600 to $5000, amounting to $180,000; and thirty-five 
inspectors at from $2750 to $3300, amounting to $110,000. Here 
we have $650,000 for salaries of men who direct the work, and 
their traveling expenses are probably as much more, so that we 
have more than a million dollars to be spent on ornamental man- 
agers of this fund. That is largely political graft, and we might as 
well set it down so." 

Comparing the cost of the Prohibition Unit with other Govern- 
mental expenditures, Representative Gallivan said: 

"The Prohibition Unit costs forty times as much as the Executive 
Department proper, including the President's salary of $75,000. 

"Secretary of the Treasury Mellon sent us an estimate of $11,- 
550,000 to pay for the Customs Service, which manages our foreign 
imports and collects the revenue, but Haynes (Prohibition Com- 
missioner) demands ten millions to cut off such revenues. The 
Treasury estimates $11,000,000 for the support of the Coast Guard, 



to pay the brave men who patrol 10,000 miles of coast, rescue 
wrecked mariners, and save ships and cargoes, but Haynes de- 
manded almost as much money to pay an army to hunt down the 
people in their homes and see what they have in the larder and 
cellar. The Public Health Service requested $11,500,000 to fight 
epidemics and protect the health of the people, but Haynes begged 
for ten millions to interfere with the doctors, hold them up on their 
errands of mercy until they show that they have no alcoholic stimu- 
lant in their saddle bags to minister to dying men without a regular 
permit from the Prohibition Unit. 

"The Geological Survey, the Bureau of Mines and the National 
Parks asked only eight millions for protection from vandals and 
marauders. Haynes wants ten millions to send his marauders and 
vandals into the homes and the business places and playgrounds 
of all the people. Irrigation is to cost $7,000,000, and Haynes 
wants ten millions to undo irrigation and make the land again a 
desert. The whole Department of Labor is to cost $6,301,835 to 
care for the multiplied activities of that department, but Haynes 
wants ten millions to irritate and exasperate labor. 

"The Attorney General asks for $2,973,645 to prosecute all vio- 
lators of the Federal laws, and the Federal courts, including the 
United States Supreme Court, circuit and district courts, are to have 
$12,560,000 to try all offenders, but Haynes wants ten millions to 
make criminals to be tried in the Federal courts by the Attorney 
General, to clog the dockets of these courts with police court cases 
and compel Congress to authorize more Federal judges. 

"The activities of the Prohibition Commissioner are not confined 
to official duties in enforcing the Volstead law, notwithstanding his 
request for $10,000,000 to pay his official agents. He is said to be 
organizing vigilance committees of private citizens and giving them 
semi-official status as 'dollar-a-year men' to act as informers. 

"Commissioner Kramer invited the clergy to aid in enforcing the 
Volstead law by acting as informers on the members of their con- 
gregation, and Commissioner Haynes invited the public school 
teachers to take up the same work, but both the clergy and the 
school teachers rejected the invitation. 

"The day is not far distant," Representative Gallivan said, "when 
the American people will go to the polls and demand that Congress 
shall make good its promise of economy in all branches of the 
Government, not only reduce appropriations for legitimate functions 
of government, but stop this waste of money in feeding an illegiti- 
mate child of Federal power more hateful to the great majority of 
the American people than any war powers ever used by any of our 
Presidents when we were engaged in war. You hesitate to pass a 
bonus bill for the boys who went into the trenches to fight the Ger- 
man autocracy, but you will vote to appropriate millions to pension 
a lot of men who remained at home during the war to plot against 
the legislative power of Congress and dictate to you how the taxes 
are to be distributed and how they may interpret the law for the 
administrative branch of the Government, regardless of the enact- 
ments of this body. Your Frankenstein has in two years taken pos- 
session of your votes, if not of your souls, and it will continue to 
delve its arms into the Treasury until the voters next November 
show you that they have no fear of the monster and do not propose 
longer to be represented on this floor by cowardice when it comes 
to appropriating their tax money to an army of political pap- 
suckers." 



February 25, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




Easy M©e©y U-vc Wiftdh Rimers 1 ▼ 




i 

SifiS ^SXggK SSSKSSBIIS 

The lineal descendants of the tribe of reformers who enacted the 
Blue Laws of Connecticut, that fined a man caught kissing his wife 
on Sunday, are going to make the movies chemically pure, if they 
have, figuratively, to burn all the magnates, matinee idols and 
vamps of the screen, as they once burned the witches in New Eng- 
land. 

A thorough investigation of the whole moving picture industry by 
Federal authorities is now demanded by the witch burners. These 
advocates, in demanding such an investigation, say the country has 
been deeply shocked by the rapid developments in the strange 
murder of William Desmond Taylor, film director, at Hollywood, 
because almost daily in connection with it has been unfolded the 
name of some favorite actress of the movies. 

The latest case, the reformers assert, is associated in the public 
mind with that of Fatty Arbuckle, and the film producers whose 
names were featured in the Boston investigation as revealing con- 
ditions of immorality that must be corrected. But it is a question 
in the minds of reformers of the films whether the disclosures in 
connection with these scandals have typified the worst. 

Their keen noses are sure to smell out everything suspiciously 
odoriferous in movie land. Debauchery behind the screen worse 
than that shown in the most extreme sex plays will be revealed by a 
complete investigation of the entire industry, say the reformers, who 
declare that they are ready to produce young women artists who 
fell prey to vultures of the industry and whose stories of their mis- 
fortunes will shock the nation, proclaim the renovators of public 
morality. 

A national scandal involving the movies would be welcomed by 
the prohibition fanatics, who are finding it uphill work to prove 
their protestations that taboo of beer and wine is a godsend to 
humanity, particularly the workingman. They have just got $9,- 
250,000 out of the United States treasury to enforce prohibition, 
and another like appropriation to battle the devil behind the screen 
would come in very handy. Practical reform looms up as a better 
business than gold mining. 

Old Rev. Cotton Mather, who burned the witches in Boston, lived 
before his time. Where the faithful of Rev. Cotton's day contrib- 
uted nickels to brand and burn witches, millions are now poured 
into the laps of professional reformers by our United States Gov- 
ernment. 

The lineal descendant of Rev. Cotton Mather is Canon William 
Sheafe Chase, leader and spokesman for the movement which re- 
sulted in the creation of the Moving Picture Commission of New 
York state. A bill for the investigation of the moving picture in- 
dustry as a whole is pending in the Senate of the United States, 
where it was introduced by Senator Myer of Montana. Canon 
Chase, who has prepared a bill providing for Federal control of 
film productions, says he is ready to hold that measure in abeyance 
pending the proposed investigation of the industry, which he con- 
siders more urgent. 

The real trouble with the movies, say the reformers, is that the 
business is in the hands of a few men who have a strangle hold on 
art and will do anything for money. The consequent scandals de- 
mand the adoption of the law prepared by United States Senator 
Myer last August, to shed light on all the dark spots in the picture 
business and prepare the way for official censorship. 

Of course the whole thing is puritanical hysteria, the desire of 
the elders of fanaticism to thrust their dark lanterns into every hole 
and corner where the devil may be lurking, with malevolent de- 




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signs against the brethren and sisters. Things will never be right 
until we get back to the old Blue Laws of Connecticut that fined a 
man for kissing his wife on Sunday. 

We have prohibition written in the Constitution, and we must 
have all the other sumptuary laws — no fishing on Sunday, no base- 
ball on Sunday, no joy-riding on Sunday, no movies on Sunday, 
no anything on Sunday but singing hymns and thanking heaven we 
are not as our brethren publicans and sinners. One wonders what 
would happen in these United States if they should ever be de- 
prived for a moment of moral guardianship of our professional re- 
formers and their assistants, drawing fat salaries for the herding of 
our souls. 

One wonders, too, what they shall all do for a living after they 
have put every safeguard against sin in the Constitution — the anti- 
fishing-on-Sunday amendment, the anti-baseball-on-the-Sabbath 
amendment, the anti-cigarettes amendment, the anti-racing amend- 
ment, the anti-pinochle amendment and the movie censorship. The 
devil being dead and gone and his habitation to let, with no pros- 
pect of tenants, will our chemical fumigation squad begin to turn 
its batteries on itself? Many unkind critics say that ought to have 
been its first move. 



YEARS AND HONORS 

The late Viscount Bryce, author of "The American Common- 
wealth," whom America knew as an Englishman, was an Ulster 
Irishman, born at Belfast in 1838. He studied in the Glasgow High 
School and afterwards in the University of Glasgow, thence pro- 
ceeding to Oxford, where he took many honors, and in 1862 gradu- 
ated B. A. with a double first class. In the same year he was elected 
a Fellow at Oriel College, Oxford, and published "The Holy Roman 
Empire"— a work which was suggested by his Arnold prize essay 
on the same subject. Then he proceeded to Heidelberg for the pur- 
pose of adding to his great store of knowlege by further study. In 
1867 he was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn and practiced with 
more or less success for fifteen years. Mr. Bryce was appointed 
Regius Professor of Civil Law in Oxford University in 1870, and 
continued to hold that position for twenty-three years. He became 
British Ambassador to Washington in 1907. 

His last book, published in 1921. was "Modern Democracies," in 
two volumes, a remarkable achievement in any sense, and more 
remarkable still as the work of a man of eighty-three, says the 
Westminster Gazette. 



K R O P E-S F A MOTS WONDER GLASS 
\ MMtXI.I.ms M.W INVENTION 

"Binoculette" 



}i Actual 

Si/A- 




'. tual 
SIM 



\ COMBINED nl'I.KV un.l HKI.I1 (.1 IBS. < an l.e carried In » 

m»n« \e«t p...ket or lad] » imr.f. and welchs only 3V4 »»»«>■ 

I Trill Ittdoon >.r Out. Keenlar Price *3.',.0O. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Optical Expert rod Importer! <>f Optica] Spedalttea 

960 Market street. I.etween Ma«on anil Taylor Street* 

PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 25, 1922 




'Har&Cncr'Xbo HrHtn/xi fflbo f 

— We hope that Supervisor John Hynes does not think that he 
is fooling the taxpayers with the notion that it is patriotism which 
makes him vote for $5 a day for unemployed veterans instead 
of $3. No, John, the taxpayers know that such generosity with 
other people's money is to secure union votes and not to glorify 
military heroism. 

■ — It wouldn't do to give needy veterans $3 a day out of the 
$25,000 emergency unemployment fund while street sweepers get 
more pay than many professors in the university. By fixing the 
veterans' dole at $5 a day and scattering the $25,000 fund as 
rapidly as possible, the political record is kept straight on "keeping 
up wages." 

— Jim Phelan, when Mayor, gave the unemployed $1 a day for 
building boulevards, and it was a black mark against him politically 
for many a day. In San Francisco it is necessary for the Mayor 
and Supervisors to be politicians first, civic-spirited citizens second, 
and business men last of all. 

— The admission that the $25,000 fund for the relief of veterans 
at $5 a day is almost expended means that the bottom of the 
emergency charity box is already in sight. Now there will be an- 
other "emergency" appropriation, and $50,000, perhaps, will be 
spent rapidly instead of making the fund last as long as possible. 

— How many real veterans got $5 a day out of the emergency 
fund for the unemployed? What percentage of them were hangers- 
on of the Board of Works? 

— It will take another city election — or perhaps two — to free the 
City Hall from the influence of closed shop politics. 

— School Superintendent Roncovieri shooed away the reporter 
who wanted to know how the public schools stood on Darwin's 
theory of evolution, giving mankind the relationship of cousins to 
the monkeys. One reason why the School Superintendent holds on 
so long is that he doesn't bother with any new theories, but holds 
fast to the good old one that public education is chiefly designed 
to spend money on school houses and salaries, etc. 

— The marriage of the McCormick girl to Max Oser, the old 
Swiss riding teacher, retires Fatty Arbuckle as the headliner of the 
journalistic daily vaudeville. "God moves in a mysterious way his 
wonders to perform." But whose business is it, after all, whom the 
little heiress wants to marry? 

¥ ¥ 9 

— Volstead enforcers have seized a large stock of liquors in an 
Ellis street hotel. But all the captures and fines of last year 
amounted only to $2500, and Congress appropriated $9,250,000 
for enforcers' salaries. Besides, there were hundreds of millions lost 
in duties on beer and wine. 

* * * 

— Because the advocates of soldiers' bonus make the most noise, 
Congress must not think that they are most numerous. Noisy minori- 
ties have been getting away with many things. Why make public 
government a question of noise? A boiler factory would smother 
even La Follette. 



— The efforts of the daily newspapers to keep up with all the 
divorces and other complications of society is like the fruitless 
struggle of the Volstead enforcers to catch up with the bootleggers. 
"It simply can't be done, noways." 

— Supervisor Dick Welch will build the bridge to Oakland if he 
has to do all the work himself, and commuters can then ride to 
their jobs in San Francisco in their own flivvers and congest street 
traffic instead of paying ferry fares. 

— Hearst is strong for the soldiers' bonus, which should convince 
every thoughtful and patriotic citizen it is wrong and bound to do 
much public harm. 

— Mary Garden is to quit opera, the rumor says. But if she does, 
it's a cinch she will become a "sob sister" on the newspapers, and 
we never will hear the last of her sayings and doings. 



MANAGER FEE'S USEFUL SCENIC FOLDER 

Charles S. Fee, manager of the passenger traffic department of 
the Southern Pacific Company, has issued a very attractive scenic 
folder for the convenience of convention delegates to San Francisco, 
the "Convention Center" of the world in 1922. The folder furnishes 
condensed but very useful information about all the points of inter- 
est to visitors in California. It contains a fine scenic map, showing 
not only the railroad routes from Vancouver to Guymas, but typical 
views of the scenery at many places. One cannot imagine a more 
welcome publication for travelers, who can see at a glance the 
directions of their roads and the characteristics of the topography 
at the points where they intend to sojourn. There will be a big 
demand for Mr. Fee's scenic folder this year. 



TRUCKEE MECCA OF FILM COMPANIES 

Truckee, with its unusually heavy snowfall this season, has proven 
so attractive to moving picture companies desiring to dramatize 
stories of the "Far North" that it is now the "Alaska of Movie- 
dom," with five prominent film companies on the ground and others 
looking over the field for locations. The recent storm which swept 
the state piled up the snow to great depths. 

The Lasky Company has been busy constructing "props," such 
as log cabins and other structures — in preparation for the finishing 
of a large production with a Canadian setting. Penrhyn Stanslaws, 
the noted artist, has been directing the production, and W. L. 
Griffith, production manager for the company, has secured the as- 
sistance of Colonel Richard Blaydon of the Northwest Mounted 
Police. Ruth Roland, popular movie star, is being featured in a 
"thriller." 

Sleighing and tobogganing, skiing and snowshoeing are among 
the winter sports at Truckee this year. 



DAYS OF '49 DEPICTED 

Depicting the early days of California with its famous old mining 
camps of "Hangtown," "Slug Gulch," "Whisky Diggings," "You 
Bet," and others with equally odd names derived from incidents 
born of the gold-rush hysteria, a "Days of '49" celebration will 
be held in Sacramento May 23 to 28. 

Features of the celebration will be floats and pageants represent- 
ing the discovery of gold at Sutter Fort; the gold rush with its 
picturesque prairie schooners pulled by plodding ox teams; the 
bizarre dance halls and events having to do with the early history 
of California. 

Two hundred and fifty Indians from the Klamath Falls Indian 
Reservation will be in Sacramento for the week and will erect their 
own Indian village after the manner of those used in the early 
days. 



February 25, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



THE PARK AQUARIUM 

The preliminary work on the Steinhart aquarium is to be com- 
menced at once. The structure is made possible through a gift of 
the late Ignatz Steinhart, an admirer of Golden Gate Park. Prior 
to his death in 1917, he announced a gift of $100,000 to the city 
for the construction of the aquarium, but when his will was read 
it was found he had bequeathed $250,000 for the undertaking. 
This amount was turned over to the Academy of Sciences, and since 
has grown to $275,000. The money in its entirety will be used for 
the building, contents and grounds, leaving the maintenance to the 
city. Expert supervision of the aquarium was assured last Novem- 
ber when the California Academy of Sciences appointed Dr. Barton 
Warren Evermann as director and Alvin Seale the superintendent. 
Both men are distinguished in aquarium work, having participated 
in the construction and supervision of aquariums in different parts 
of the world. 

The aquarium will possess many unusual features, among them 
being the inside court, which is to be constructed in the nature of 
a swamp, containing fish, snakes, frogs, turtles, salamanders and 
other amphibians, arranged as near as possible to their natural 
habitat. Surrounding this court will be the many exhibit rooms, 
specializing deep-sea life. Such a building long has been the dream 
of San Francisco, and as far back as 1916 resolutions were adopted 
by city organizations urging that steps be taken to build an aqua- 
rium. The Board of Supervisors voted $20,000 toward the upkeep 
of the institution. 



NEW QUARTERS OF PACIFIC MUTUAL CO. 

The establishment of new quarters on the fifteenth floor of the 
Alexander Building, corner of Montgomery and Bush streets, by the 
Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company, draws fresh attention to 
the remarkable progress of that corporation. Its prosperity has 
almost increased by leaps and bounds. Since organization, the com- 
pany has paid its policyholders the sum of $76,205,029. In 1911 it 
paid over $2,000,000; in 1918 over $5,000,000; in 1919 nearly 
$5,000,000; in 1920, over $5,000,000; in 1921 it paid $7,612,662 
That is a fine showing. 

The company has completed a splendid twelve-story building in 
Los Angeles on an architectural ground plan somewhat similar to 
our Hotel St. Francis, affording unsurpassed lighting. Its San Fran- 
cisco quarters on the fifteenth floor of the new Alexander Building 
on Montgomery street are also superably lighted. It would be hard 
to find in the world a company so admirably housed. 

The Los Angeles building is a Class A structure, and fireproof 
throughout. The steel frame is embedded in concrete and the ex- 
terior finished in ornamental glazed light gray tile. It has a large 
and cheerful rest room for the women employes. 

The balance sheet of the Pacific Mutual Company for 1921 
shows: New life insurance issued, $81,184,108; gain in cash in- 
come over 1920, $2,140,127; gain in admitted assets. $6,904,- 
754.66; gain in reserves, $6,021,426.23. 



ENGLISH CRITICISM OF DE VALERA 

The London Times is not very complimentary to De Valera. It 
says: "Mr. De Valera professes to be sick of politics and will re- 
tire. We do not believe him. He is both sincere and unscrupulous. 
Of course, he believes quite automatically in all that furthers his 
own ambition. That is common. A fanatic, both rigid and cunning, 
he is more like a typical Inquisitor than an Irishman. He is a 
Robespierre, who would send the dearest of his former friends to 
the guillotine for a formula and eat his dinner afterwards with a 
self-righteousness, set and systematic enough to stagger the Phari- 
sees. He is impassioned for abstractions, but cold in the flesh-and- 
blood humanities." 



A Most Interesting 
Trip to the East 




is over the 



Sunset Route 

—through Los Angeles, 
Tucson, El Paso, San 
Antonio, Houston and 
New Orleans. 



TWO DAILY TRAINS FROM SAN FRANCISCO 
(Third Street Station) 

"Sunset Limited" Lv. 5:00 p.m. 

Ar. New Orleans 7:35 p.m. (3d Day) 

"Sunset Express" Lv. 8:15 p.m. 

Ar. New Orleans 6:25 p.m. (4th Day) 

CONNECTING WITH SOUTHERN PACIFIC OCEAN STEAM- 
ERS sailing weekly to New York; also with daily trains to 
North and Bast. \ 

Huil mill Steamer fun- sunn- us All-Rail, but includes meals and 
lolden Hours at s a." 

On Your Way—See the 

APACHE TRAIL OF ARIZONA- 

By auto through the heart of "Apache Land" — a maze of 
canyons, peaks and cliffs aglow with bright colors — 120 
miles of scenic splendor. A one-day side trip or detour. 

IIKTIIIK I'llllM MAKKOI'A thrnuKh I'hoen Ham 

and Globe t" Bowie; ok side tkip from BOWIE via 

OLOBB I" Kiiii-i-vidl Dam and return. Take Phoenix Si 

or Globe Sleeper, Sundays, aid Fridays, from Los 

Ana 

! ii-t. .or nr Side Trip fare £20.00. 

You can stop off at El Paso and go by street car into Old 
Mexico; or you can stop at New Orleans and visit many 
historic places. Mardi Gras festivities to Feb. 28th. 

For Railroad and Pullman Fares Ask Agents 

50 POST ST.— FERRY STATION— THIRD ST. STATION 
or Phone Sutter 4000 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 25, 1922 



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Uptown Now Soon Downtown 

The management of the Hotel Whitcomb, under Ernest Drury, 
opens with bright auspices. The Hotel Whitcomb is no longer 
"uptown." It iS just one block from the center of the theatrical 
district. It is an ideal location for a family hotel of the best class, 
and has b'.-en catering to that desirable clientele with marked suc- 
cess. It is one of the most substantial structures in the city, and is 
delightfully attractive in finishings and decorations. Its splendid 
dancing floor, and tea room on the roof, from which an incompar- 
able panorama of the city is observable, gives it unique distinction. 

The rapid movement of the theatrical center uptown, as in New 
York, places the Hotel Whitcomb in the zone of first-class hotels. 
Before many years it may be considered downtown. Not many 
years ago all the first-class hotels in New York were below Four- 
teenth street and Union Square. Now the fashionable hotel district 
is above Fortieth street, and still moving out. We should remember 
that San Francisco is a very new city, and its only definitely estab- 
lished district is its financial section, east of Montgomery street. An 
uptown passenger depot, to serve for peninsular travel, will be 
established uptown, and that will further expedite the westward 
and southern movement, for the city's main thoroughfares run west 
and south towards San Mateo, and the latter is the only direction 
in which it can fully expand. 

Rent Profiteers Killing the Goose 

Landlords who are raising rents all along Geary, Post and Suiter 
streets, and Market street as far as Jones, should remember the 
fable about killing the goose which laid the golden eggs. In New 
York it has been done already, and good tenants have been forced 
into other locations or driven out of business. The New York World 
says: 

"Rent profiteers are driving Long Acre east and west. John H. 
Scheier, architect and operator, who leased the southeast corner of 
Seventh avenue and Forty-eighth street for twenty-one years at 
$1 ,000,000, said he did it on account of this new overflow from 
the amusement and hotel hub. He leased recently the new building 
on the southwest corner at Forty-ninth street for $900,000. He 
will build six stories on the Forty-eighth street corner. 

"Broadway and Long Acre Square merchants and business men 
are finding it difficult to pay the abnormally high rents demanded 
for stores and offices on those thoroughfares, and are seeking loca- 
tions nearby in Seventh and Eighth avenues, and on side streets, 
where they can obtain space at a very substantial reduction," said 
he. "The avenues parallel Broadway at a very little distance from 
the Great White Way, and there is comparatively little property 
to be had there in the short stretch between the upper end of 
Times Square and the Sixth avenue elevated line, crossing from 
Sixth to Ninth avenues at Fifty-third street. Large office buildings 
and the new Earl Carroll Theater between Forty-seventh and Fiftieth 
streets, with the demand for quarters in this favorably located 
neighborhood, show which way the wind blows. I am acquiring 
choice corners on Seventh avenue because in a short time it will 
be just as difficult to get a location there as it is now to get a 
store on Broadway for love or money." 

Los Angeles Fraternizes With Us 

The resumption of friendly relations between the real estate fra- 
ternity of Los Angeles and San Francisco is most admirable. The 



two great cities of California can do most for their state by har- 
mony in making its advantages known. 

That Los Angeles was a village the other day, so to speak, and 
is now heading for the million mark in population, should only show 
us in San Francisco that we have not made the most of our oppor- 
tunities. We must speed our progress. Nothing can prevent San 
Francisco from being recognized the world over as the great sea- 
port of the Pacific, but we must not sit still and plume ourselves 
on our superiority while demagogues undermine the foundation of 
our prosperity. 

A number of years ago there were fraternal relations between 
the realtors of Los Angeles and those of San Francisco, but it was 
chilled by the domination of class politics in San Francisco, which 
discouraged any friendliness towards the Southern city. 

Now that the open shop has been established in our metropolis, 
and the building trade is awakening as it from a Rip Van Winkle 
sleep, we may see the resumption of the old spirit of fraternity 
between San Francisco and Los Angeles and the establishment and 
joint aid in the upbuilding of California as the Empire state of the 
Pacific. We can do more for ourselves in California by friendly 
co-operation, and win much readier recognition from the Washing- 
ton government, when appealing as brothers in state progress, in- 
stead of enemies intent on commercial and industrial war. 

Too much credit cannot be given to our San Francisco Real 
Estate Board for its efforts to cement the bonds of friendship be- 
tween the real estate fraternity of Los Angeles and San Francisco. 
Amongst the well known citizens who have united prominently 
in the admirable work are: Colbert Caldwell, president of the San 
Francisco Real Estate Board; A. S. Baldwin, Major Bruce Caldwell, 
George C. Boardman, Harry B. Allen, George E. Belvel, A. B. Har- 
rison and Duncan McDufhe. 

Among those in the Los Angeles party who were so hospitably 
welcomed and entertained by ihe San Francisco realtors were: O. 
A. Vickery, Gilbert Wright, I. L. Borden, R. C. Willis, C. L. Grant, 
C. P. King, Herman Janss, Ed Janss, Harry Haldeman, R. L. 
Philips, C. R. Duncan, Herbert L. Cornish, H. M. Porter, H. F. 
Metcalf, Robert Baker, W. W. Robson. C. F. Hoiman, E. L. Hart, 
A. L. Wares, W. I. Hollingsworth. Fred Latimer and M. L. Mays. 
Will the Examiner Move to Ninth Street 
An indication of how the trend of business uptown is affecting 
investors is the report in realty circles this week that Hearst desires 
to sell his building at the corner of Third and Market streets, and 
erect an Examiner building at the corner of Ninth and Market 
streets, opposite the Civic Auditorium. The corner of Ninth and 
Market streets has been sold and the question is, what improvement 
shall be placed upon it? Some say a large market. Some say that 
the erection of an Examiner building there has been decided on. It 
would be a good business move to sell the very valuable corner of 
Third and Market streets, which is very desirable for stores and 
offices, and place the plant of the Examiner in a less congested 
place on the main street of the city. In financial circles it was said 
that some of the savings banks had been approached on the sub- 
ject. Any savings bank would be glad to interest itself in such a 
project. 

Upper Market street is rapidly coming into prominence, just as 
upper Broadway did in New York. The building of the new theaters 
uptown is the first strong indication. That development has been 
followed by the doubling of rents on all upper Market street, and 



February 25, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS - WEEKLY 



II 



the leasing of the Whitcomb Hotel by Mr. Linnard, who intends to 
run it in connection with the Fairmont Hotel and his Southern Cali- 
fornia interests. 

An uptown depot at Eighth or Twelfth and Market streets is also 
a certainty. Connection with San Mateo will be soon improved. 
The opening of the Duboce avenue tunnel to connect the Sunset 
district with downtown by rapid service is also favorable to the 
rapid advance of upper Market street. It cannot be stopped. 

Material Men Raising Prices 

People are always trying to put a crimp in prosperity. They are 
never satisfied with leaving well enough alone. There is a public 
desire to build houses, but the building trades want wages that 
make it impossible to establish reasonable rents, and the material 
men are raising some of their prices. The price of inferior lumber 
was recently reduced, but the price of first class lumber has been 
raised. Hardware has advanced. It is not possible to build houses 
for less than a thousand dollars a room, and at that figure the most 
building investments cannot pay proper interest. 

Prohibitive Building Costs 

A building investment by a property owner, who has just erected 
three flats on Second avenue near Fulton street, is interesting, as 
showing that low rents at present are impossible. The flats contain 
six rooms and are only heated by gas grates. They cost over 
$21,000, and the owner asks $80 a month rent for them. Of course, 
that is excessive, but when the taxes, the vacancies, the insurance 
and the repairs are figured in, the investment would not bring 7 
per cent. How does that compare with tax-free bonds? No wonder 
that property owners are timid about building, and that there is a 
scarcity of places to rent at reasonable figures. By the union raises 
in wages and the combines of material men to hold up their rates, 
building of homes has been made a hazardous venture. Unless a 
building speculation offers returns of from 10 to 20 per cent, it 
does not attract careful investors. 

The three flats of six rooms each on Second avenue, for which 
$80 a month is asked, are beyond the reach of the average wage- 
earner. Eighty dollars a month is 6 per cent on $16,000. Most of 
the wage-earners in apartment houses pay from $15 to $20 a room. 
A three-room apartment for less than $60 is hard to find. At such 
rates the rent of a $60 apartment of three rooms equals 24 per 
cent on $3000, the cost of building the three rooms. It is ruinous 
for the tenants. 

Another consideration which makes building tenement houses 
hazardous is that architectural styles change in residential localities. 
Tenements require stylish houses, and the older houses have to be 
remodeled or pulled down, or the district becomes an undesirable 
neighborhood. One can note that condition in some parts of the 
district west of Van Ness avenue to Divisadero and south of Clay 
street. Formerly it was the district of middle-class homes and social 
life, but the old occupants have gone and a different class ha6 
moved in. Property values have fallen. 

The people now engaged in erecting new apartment houses figure 
that in the first couple of years they can make up by high rents 
for the excessive costs of labor and material. After that they will 
be in a position to accept 10 and 15 per cent on their investment 
instead of 20 and 25 per cent. 

Apartment houses and stores in established business districts are 
the only kinds of buildings that offer inducements to careful in- 
vestors at present while wages and materials are so high. There 
must be liberal readjustments of wages and prices of material be- 
fore the building of ordinary flats and houses will proceed normally, 
and the building crisis will become less of a menace to the wage- 
earner. 



*i' ,;■ »j. .j. »j, ,;. ,j. »j. »j> ,j« »j* * 



— Remember that the three hundred millions for the first year of 
the soldiers' bonus is only a bare start. 



> .J. <.^.^. .:..;..:..•..;..;..;..;..;..;..;,...,..,..,.......,..„.....,...., ^,^^.^ 

* 

I 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



Established 1865 

Larkins 

Automobile 

Painting 



Buying a Larkins Paint Job is 

like buying good tires— you get 
more miles to the dollar. 

The durability of the Larkins 
Paint Job makes unnecessary 
the laying up of the car for paint- 
ing soon again. 

Both time and money are saved. 



«i5s» 



Larkins & Co. 

First Avenue and Geary Street 
San Francisco 

Makers of the Larkins Top 



* * 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 25, 1 922 




ociot 




Busy Cupid 

THE marriage of Miss Helen Pierce and 
Mr. Victor Cooley took place last week 
at the hone of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Pierce 
in Santa Clara. The wedding was unex- 
pected and the arrangements were simple 
owing to the illness of Mr. Cooley. Only 
relatives and two or three close friends were 
at the wedding. The bride is one of the 
most charming girls in society. She comes 
from one of the oldest families of Santa 
Clara county and is a granddaughter of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. James Henry Pierce of 
San Jose. She is a niece of Mrs. Frederick 
Hope Beaver, Mrs. F. D. Goodhue, Mrs. L. 
L. Morse and the late Mrs. Frank D. Madi- 
son, all of whom as girls were belles of San 
Jose and San Francisco society. Mr. Harry 
Pierce of San Jose is an uncle. Mr. Cooley 
is an Easterner who has lived in California 
for a number of years. Last winter his busi- 
ness took him to Dallas, Texas, and the 
young couple will live there. 

— The wedding of Miss Catherine Mohun 
and Oswald George Quarre took place on 
Wednesday at St. Edward's Church, with 
the Most Reverend Archbishop Edward J. 
Hanna officiating. Miss Martha Mohun was 
her sister's only attendant, and Victor Max- 
well best man. A wedding breakfast for the 
members of both families was served at the 
Mohun residence on Maple street following 
the ceremony. 

Luncheons 

— Miss Elizabeth Dozier was hostess at 
luncheon and bridge at her home on Divisa- 
dero street on Saturday afternoon. Miss 
Dozier is the sub-debutante daughter of 
Mrs. Melville Dozier Jr. 

— Mrs. Henry T. Scott gave a large 
luncheon on Wednesday at the St. Francis 
as a farewell to Mrs. Reginald Brooke of 




The Greatest Value Euer 

Offered the Motor 

World 



Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 



London, who is visiting her at Burlingame. 
The luncheon took place in the Borgia 
room. Mrs. Brooke will sail for Japan on 
March 4, and after touring the Orient will 
continue around the world to her home in 
London. 

— Mrs. Joseph N. Masten gave a lunch- 
eon Saturday at her Washington street 
home for Mrs. Peter F. Dunne, Miss Marian 
and Miss Marjorie Dunne and Mrs. Joseph 
Rucker, who will leave March 9 for Europe. 
Other guests were Mrs. Frank Somers, Mrs. 
James Rupert Mason, Mrs. William Han- 
nam. Miss Gladys Quarre, Miss Barbara 
Sesnon, Miss Nance and Miss Sally Obear. 
— Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Judge gave a 
luncheon Sunday at the Burlingame Country 
Club. Their guests included several friends 
from town. 

— Mrs. Joseph Thomas Grace assembled 
about sixty of her friends at luncheon at 
the San Francisco Golf and Country Club 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Teas 
— Miss Cordelia Smith, whose engage- 
ment to Harold Snodgrass was announced 
recently, was the guest of honor at a tea 
which Mrs. Charles H. Turner gave Monday 
afternoon in the Fable room at the Hotel 
St. Francis. 

— Mrs. Frederick William Fay (Helen 
Gould), who returned recently from a 
honeymoon abroad, shared the honors with 
Miss Elvira Coburn, fiancee of Lawrence 
Jordon, at a tea which Miss Virginia Powell 
gave at the Fairmont Hotel on Friday aft- 
ernoon. 

— Mrs. Charles C. Moore has sent out 
cards for a tea to be given on Monday, 
February 27, at her home in Washington 
street. 

— Complimenting Mrs. William K. New- 
ton of New York, who is visiting relatives 
in California for several months, Mrs. Syd- 
ney Van Wyck entertained at an informal 
tea at her home on Lyon street Tuesday 
afternoon. 

Bridge 
—To welcome Mrs. Frank E. Miller of 
Chicago and in farewell to Mrs. Edwin L. 
Griffith and her sister, Miss Mary Pauline 
Coppee, who are leaving soon for Europe, 
Mrs. James Kendall Armsby entertained at 
bridge at her home in Ross Monday even- 
ing. Mrs. Miller is a guest at the James 
Kendall Armsby home in Ross. 

— One of the largest of the bridge teas 
to end the season before Lent took place 
this week at the home of Mrs. Horace D. 
Pillsbury on Pacific avenue. It was a public 
affair, given as a benefit to aid the work 
done by the woman's auxiliary of the Uni- 
versity of California hospital clinic, which 
carries on health and curative work among 



the sick poor. Besides the bridge games 
there were other diversions. A clever horo- 
scope reader was there, and later tea was 
served. 

— Mrs. Romola Sbarboro entertained at 
another of a series of bridge teas at her 
home Monday. 

Dinners 

— Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler Lee and their 
daughters. Miss Rosemonde and Miss Mar- 
garet Lee, gave a dinner Thursday evening 
at their home in Pierce street for some of 
the members of the debutante set. 

— Mr. Clark Crocker gave a dinner last 
Saturday evening at his home at Laguna 
and Washington streets for Miss Lucia 
Chase of Washington, who is here with Gen- 
eral and Mrs. George Barnett. Mr. Crocker's 
mother, Mrs. Henry J. Crocker, chaperoned 
the party. 

— Complimenting Mr. and Mrs. Frederick 
Watriss of New York, who are visiting at 
the Whitelay Reid home in Burlingame, Mr. 
and Mrs. Richard McCreery entertained at 
dinner at their Burlingame home Tuesday 
evening. 

Dances 

— The distinction of being Queen of the 
Mardi Gras ball, which will be held on Feb- 
ruary 28 at the Civic Auditorium, has been 
conferred on Mrs. Richard McCreery by 
popular vote. That she will make a beau- 
tiful Queen goes without saying, and that 
the magnificent Arabian costume will add 
to her beauty also is true. Attention and 
admiration are nothing new to Mrs. Mc- 
Creery, who, as Lady Grey Egerton, was 
considered the handsomest woman in Lon- 



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352 SUTTER STREET 

(ABl i\ E GRANT AVE.) 
AND INSPECT THE SHOWING OF 

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AT S A ME PRICES AS SOLD IN 

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Harry L. Jackson 

.152 SUTTER STREET 

TELEPHONE iius .{801 



February 25, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



don society. She was Miss Eleanor Cuyler, 
a daughter of the late Colonel Wayne Cuy- 
ler of the United States Army, and a belle 
of Washington. She belongs to the exclusive 
Cuyler family of Baltimore and Philadel- 
phia, and when she went on a visit to Lon- 
don as a girl she created a sensation with 
her loveliness. She married Sir Grey Eger- 
ton, who was Master of the Horse to King 
Edward VII, when she was still in her teens 
and became one of the leaders of the smart 
set in London. She came to Burlingame as 
the wife of Dick McCreery, who inherited 
millions from his father, the late Andrew 
McCreery, a big real estate owner here. The 
late Mrs. Andrew McCreery spent much of 
the latter part of her life abroad and her 
sons were educated there. Mrs. McCreery 
wi(l be a popular as well as a beautiful 
Queen of the Mardi Gras ball, and Burlin- 
game society is delighted at the outcome of 
the contest. 

— The Misses Callahan will give a dan- 
cing party for the friends of their niece, 
Miss Virginia Lemman, this Saturday even- 
ing. 

— Seventy-five bachelors gave a dinner- 
dance Tuesday evening at the San Fran- 
cisco Golf and Country Club for an equal 
number of girls. The party was chaperoned 
by the parents of the debutantes, including 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Filer, Mr. and Mrs. 
Cuyler Lee, Mr. and Mrs. William S. Kuhn, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant, Mr. and Mrs. 
Georges de Latoor, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Pringle and 
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowery. 
In Town and Out 

— Mrs. Clyde Payne and her daughter, 
Miss Dolly Madison Payne, have closed 
their apartments at the Fairmont Hotel and 
have gone to Los Angeles for three months. 
Upon their return in the early summer the 
Paynes will open their country home in 
Belvedere. 

— Mr. Douglas Alexander came from his 
home in Seattle last week and visited his 
aunt, Mrs. Mountford Wilson, and Mr. Wil- 
son at their home at Burlingame for a few 
days. Mr. Alexander returned north Sunday. 



Modern Glasses 



combine stj le, oomfort and ao 
ii. w "Colonial" rimless lenses have these 
advanti nany more. Their octa- 

gon shape renders them seml-lnvlslble, 

eliminates supi i B a weight and 

iriK side refli cl Ions fhose « h< i dee Ire the 
latesl in eyeglass style and serviceability 
u iii a, eai '< !oli mial" lenses as made 

W. i>. Feantmore A. it. Fennimore 

.1. W. I>»V|8 




s„ii Francisco - iki Poet, *BOf Mission sis. 
Berkeley ... - 1 1«« Shnttnrk Arenas 

OnUlanil ------ llll HroH.lwn.v 



— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Watriss of New 
York came West with Mrs. Whitelaw Reid 
in her private car and are visiting her at 
Millbrae. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Filer gave a 
large luncheon for them this week at the 
Burlingame Country Club. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ross Ambler Curran gave a dinner last Fri- 
day night for them, and Mr. and Mrs. Rich- 
ard McCreery entertained the New Yorkers 
this week. Mr. and Mrs. Watriss have been 
in California before and have a number of 
friends here and at Burlingame. Mrs. Wat- 
riss was Mrs. Helen Barney Alexander of 
New York and her marriage to Mr. Watriss 
took place a few years ago at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Payne Whitney on Long 
Island. 

— Mr. Walter Dillingham has arrived from 
Honolulu and is at the St. Francis. During 
his stay he will be entertained by Mr. and 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker and other friends 
down the peninsula. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Evan C. Evans will spend 
the summer in Europe and will leave in 
April. Mrs. Evans was Miss Audrey Wil- 
liams, a bride of last, month. 

— Mrs. Templeton Crocker and Miss 
Marion Zeile have gone to New York to be 
away several months. Mrs. Crocker will be 
joined by her husband shortly and together 
they plan to go abroad later in the spring. 
Miss Zeile will be a guest for part of her 
visit at the home of her cousin, Mrs. J. 
Cheever Cowdin. 

Intimations 
— Mrs. Horatio P. Livermore, who has 
been in New York for the last five months, 
returned Sunday evening and will be at her 
home on Russian Hill until midsummer, 
when she will leave for the country. During 
her visit in the East Mrs. Livermore saw 
her daughter, Miss Elizabeth Livermore, who 
is taking a course at the Prince School in 
Boston. Miss Livermore will return to Cali- 
fornia in June. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Hermon Leonard Under- 
bill (Ruth Lent), whose marriage took 
place February 9, left this week for Oswego, 
New York, where they will live. They spent 
their honeymoon at Del Monte and returned 
to town last Friday, staying at the Fairmont. 
— Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Edward Hanchett 
have arrived in New York and are guests 
at the Ritz-Carlton. 

— Mrs. George McGowan has been seri- 
ously ill at the Hotel Fairmont, having given 
up several affairs that she had planned. 

— Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Amann, who make 
their home at the Fairmont, are leaving soon 
for an extended trip. They will visit South 
America, Egypt. Italy, Switzerland, France, 
England and Ireland, spending some time in 
Paris and London, returning to New York 
and will leisurely wend their way homeward 
via Palm Beach and New Orleans via the 
Panama Canal. They expect to travel for 
two years. Mrs. Amann will be honor guest 
at a number of large affairs which have 
been planned prior to her departure. 
Del Monte 
— William W. Crocker entertained quite 
a house party at his Italian Villa at Pebble 



Beach over the week-end. He had as guests 
Mr. and Mrs. William Parrott, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence McCreery, Mrs. Jane Selby Haine, 
Miss Ysabel Chase, Richard Schwerin and 
Raymond Armsby. The party came to the 
Palm Grill at the Hotel Del Monte on Sat- 
urday evening to enjoy dancing. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ricker, who were 
recently married in Piedmont at the home 
of the bride's mother, Mrs. C. C. Clay, are 
guests at Del Monte. Mrs. Ricker was for- 
merly Mrs. Madelaine Clay Herald. 

— Golf features at Del Monte next month, 
which will attract much interest, are the 
Bletherin contest, on March 11 and 12, and 
the Pebble Beach gold golf vase on March 

17 to 19. 

— Daniel Murphy of Los Angeles and 
George Cooke of Kansas City, who spend 
much of their time with their families at 
their homes in Pebble Beach, have been ap- 
pointed on the committee to make arrange- 
ments for the Del Monte Fishing Club sea- 
son. 

— One of the outstanding attractions, the 
annual Pebble Beach paper chase, has been 
postponed until Wednesday, March 29. This 
will come during the course of the spring 
polo tournament, which opens March 25 and 
runs until April 9. The Gymkanna on April 
1 is another horse event which will provide 
diversion for visitors. 

— Mrs. Harry Howard Webb gave a hand- 
somely appointed farewell luncheon in the 
Venetian room at the Fairmont Thursday. 
The table was exquisite with its baskets of 
trailing almond blossoms, primroses and 
daffodils tied with port bows of Dresden 
faille ribbons. Twenty-one guests assembled 
to bid Mrs. Webb au revoir, as she is re- 
turning to her beautiful home in Santa Bar- 
bara after spending the winter at the Fair- 
mont. 



ELECTROLYSIS 

■ I and i' war 

superfluous hair perm mentlj rerao 1 

my latefet Improvi I needle ma- 
chine. Work guaranteed. 

HA I> A M STIVER 

LS8 liniM Street, Suite 7«S Whitney Bid*. 

Phone Douglas 
Oakland, Miite im. Wlni n nil. Bunk Bids. 

Phone Oakland 2621 



Hotel Del Monte 

.Make Your Reservations 
at City Booking Oilier 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutler 6130 
Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM .Main Corridor 

• • • • « • 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

see see 

JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • ass 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • 

UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • • • • 
FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

• • • sea 
EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 25, 1922 



}«{3SSe**JB«X*JSJ«»M«8«eX*S«X**S«^ 



renal 



jm : 



KSSSCSaCXKKKSCKKSSKJCKXSKKKSSSS^ 



Far From It — "What did you think of 
the play?" 

"I'll never be able to convince myself 
that such a show should be subject to an 
amusement tax." — Judge. 



A writer in the New York World deplores 
that commercial aeronautics is in a bad 
way. Numbers of Americans are trying to 
design and build machines. Much larger 
numbers are rashly putting money into air- 
plane "investments." Still more are flying 
now ani then, at $10 or $15 a hop or 50 
cents a mile. There are probably more ma- 
chines in the country than ever before, and 
possibly more pilots, but civil flying is still 
far from successful and it is menaced from 
two directions. 

The two perils besetting aeronautics in 
America are the familiar ogres of all infant 
projects — disorganization and dishonesty. 
The dishonesty comes from without the in- 
dustry, not from within. The disorganiza- 
tion is, of course, inevitable to all new en- 
terprises. 

We are still very far behind Europe, de- 
clares the World writer. It is a common 
enough thing to encounter a man at even- 
ing in a Paris or Berlin cafe' who calmly 
tells you that it was a brilliant morning in 
Warsaw or Budapest. You look at him in 
astonishment, wondering what the joke is 
until you remember that flying has reached 
a high development abroad and that many 
men do fly distances of 1000 and 1500 
miles in a single day. 

While commercial aeronautics in the 
United States lags behind, the military 
branch of flying goes ahead, and much 
money is spent on it. 

Not much has been said about it, but it 
is a fact that the United States Government 
Air Intermediate Depot, situated on the out- 
skirts of San Antonio, contains army avia- 
tion materials valued at $50,000,000, while 
the machinery and other equipment that go 
to make up the plant has an additional 
value of $100,000,000. 

It is one of the largest aviation and repair 
centers in the United States. The buildings 
which comprise the Government property 
are of permanent character. The special 
purpose of maintaining the depot is to keep 
constantly on hand a complete and large 
stock of airplanes and their parts for sup- 
plying the Army Aviation Service. The ware- 
houses are filled with airplane wings and 
motors. There are thousands of motors. 
Every three months these motors must be 
taken out of their boxes, thoroughly sprayed 
with a form of grease to prevent rust, and 
then treated to a similar coat of oil on the 
inside of the cylinders and other internal 
parts. They are so delicate that they must 
be carefully handled. 

Expert civilian mechanics are employed 
to do this work. Raw materials are kept on 
hand for wing and body construction, and 
whenever a spare part is needed that is not 
on hand it can be turned out in the shop. 
Wings, rudders and elevators are constructed 
in the shops. After the framework is com- 



pleted it is taken to the fabric shop, where 
linen cloth is stretched over and nailed 
down, and then it is painted. 

The monthly payroll at the depot approxi- 
mates $40,000, and there are about 400 
civilians employed as mechanics in addition 
to the twelve officers. 



Tom — "What's the 
betting and bluffing?" 
Jack — "A good deal.' 



difference between 
— Jester. 



Only When — Ho: "Did you ever stop to 
see Mildred?" Bo: "Only when she was get- 
ting on a car." — Colgate Banter. 



Watch — "And why does that man always 
refer to you as his baby girl?" 

Fob — "Oh, I don't know. I suppose I 
keep him up so late of nights." — Iowa 
Frivol. 



Money in Grain 

$12,50 buys guarantee option on 10,000 bushels 
of wheat or corn. No further risk. A movement 
of 5c front price frives you an opport unity to 
take $500; 4c. $100; 3c. $300, etc. "Write for 
particulars and free market letter. 

INVESTORS' DAILY GUIDE 

Southwest Branch, Desk CO, 1004 Baltimore Ave. 

Kansas city. Mo. 



Thomas Day C ompany 

FIRE did NOT damage our 
Factory or Office or Warehouse 



WE ARE OPEN AS USUAL AND WILL 
COMPLETE ALL ORDERS ON TIME 

Temporary Salesroom 
715 Mission Street, Second Floor 



«5« ;*!* *•* *** ■» ' *«* *!* '!• *J* ►!• **» •!« *!* "'* *!* »;• *t* *!« »i« .J. »I« *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *»* »** *** •** *** •** *** *** *** *»* **• •** *!* *** *!* •♦* "I* •** •*• ''* **' **' *»* *** •' 



JOHN LACOSTE 

President 



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HEXRY SAXL H. B. CIEKNSEY ARTHUR F. PRICE 

Supt. and Chemist Analyst and Soil Expert Consulting Cheinl*t 
PIERRE HAREILI.ES, Secretnry-Treaxurcr 

California Fertilizer Works 

Manufacturers of 

Complete Fertilizers 
Bone Meal, Etc. 

4 4 4 PINE STREET 

CALIFORNIA .MARKET BLDG. 



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Phone Douglas 3745 



Branch Office: 216 Grosse Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



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Cameo 



Order from your J> EA LE Et, for trial , sample ton — more or less — I*E 4 COCK 
COAL,. YOU will appreciate its merits, cheerful blaze, cleanliness, general sat- 
isfaction for house use. Lt'MP for grates; E<;*», better for stoves, costs one 
dollar less. Try both. 

California CLIMATE needs no expensive FURNACE FIRE, day and night. 
Best Economical substitute cameo COLORADO coal, start fire al G a, m. 

to die out early evening. Order of your DEALER sample Back or re. 

know from 205 Hobart Building where to find either. CHARLES R. AUjEN. 



February 25. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 




VWRM 



A NOVEL and very interesting method to 
make motor road travel easy has been 
invented by a radio engineer of New York. 
Even in the dead of night the car can dash 
along the darkest country road, sure of its 
location. An electric directometer, which is 
in communication with a wire beside the 
road, makes all clear to the motorist. To 
accomplish this, the Highway Commissioners 
must co-operate to the extent of installing 
wire or cable. An electric current is allowed 
to surge through the wire, which is buried 
under the roadbed or carried by telegraph 
poles. 

The cost of equipping our national high- 
ways with this electrical road guide will 
depend upon the method of installing the 
cable. In case of laying the cable under the 
roadbed at the time the road is made, the 
installation will not need to cost more than 
$75 a mile. If the poles are already along 
the road the cable can be strung for about 
the same price per mile. Overhead suspen- 
sion of the wire would be objectionable 
owing to the interference from heavy storms. 
If the signal wire were buried under the 
road, the device would function just as effi- 
ciently, since this would in no way prevent 
the spreading of the magnetic lines of force 
created by the high frequency current. 



Cars catch fire. One hears a pop back 
at the carburetor, and suddenly discovers 
it is on fire. What made it backfire in the 
carburetor? We can't find out because the 
car is a total loss. 

Cars have burned in the past and will 
again in the future due to backfiring in the 
carburetor. 

The most frequent cause is a lean mix- 
ture. This means more air in the mixture 
than usual. The carburetor gets out of ad- 
justment in some way and the mischief is 
done. A lean mixture is slow-burning. It 
burns all during the power stroke, all during 
the exhaust stroke, and it is still burning 
when the inlet valve opens, admitting the 
fresh mixture. This takes fire and the flame 
runs back to the carburetor. If there is any 
gasoline dripping from the carburetor a 
heavy vapor is formed, extending under the 
engine, where it is held by the mud pan. 
The flame spreads under the engine and 
soon reaches the tank, melting the connec- 
tion and releasing a flood of gasoline. 



Rubbing with sponges and chamois should 
be done in straight lines rather than in cir- 
cles. To prevent water drying and spotting 
it is well to clean one panel at a time. Avoid 
applying chamois, and especially the sponge. 



with any great pressure, and do not rub 
after surface is dry. 



Truthlets 

No matter how old the world gets, it will 
still have in it the species of human who 
persists in blowing out the gas. 

A woman is like a cannon; she don't 
seem ready to go until she's full of powder. 

Americans are a funny race of people; if 
water were as scarce as liquor, they would 
be paying the same prices for it. 

If apples were brains, some folks wouldn't 
be equal to the stems. 

If there were twice as many optimists as 
there are pessimists, the world might rotate 
a little better. 

A good cigar is like a penniless acquain- 
tance; no matter how short it gets, we hate 
to discard it; but if we don't we finally get 
burned. — Judge. 



His Translation — "A-u-t-o-c-r-a-c-y," 
spelled Johnny, reading aloud, and then 
pronounced it "auto crazy." And he won- 
dered why his father laughed. 



Query — She: "Don't you think that talk- 
ative women are the most popular?" He: 
"What other kinds are there?" — Boston 
Beanpost. 



"I have decided to call my home brew 
'frog,' " remarked Nutt. 

"Why?" asked Bolt. 

"Because it has plenty of hops, but not 
much kick," replied Nutt. — Milwaukee Sen- 
tinel. 



Best Equipped and Most MODERN 
GARAGE West of Cliicago 

The Century 



Two Blocks from Union Square 

075 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and Jones 



Authorized Simonizing Stations 



Monthly 
Service 
on Oiling 
and 

Greasing 
and 
Simon- 
izing 



Our Painting and Upholstering Depart- 
ment will be pleased to furnish estimates 
on any work. 

If your office or home furniture looks 
dull or dingy, send for a Simonizer. 

California Simonizing Co. 

1656 California strei-t 234.~> Broadway 

Sun Franolseo Oakland 

Ph. Prospect 3418-3419 Ph. Oakland 9523 





Over-all Dimensions, 18x40x3J/2-in 
2-in. Casters. Weight 1 7 lbs. 



Overcome Outlays for 
Costly Repairs 

by getting underneath your car regularly for inspection and adjustments. Roll right 
under in comfort on a Service Creeper equipped with double ball race casters. 



444 Market Street 



Manufactured by 

GUNN, CARLE & CO. 



Sutter 2720 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 25, 1922 




PL/EASURk'S WAND 



Granada 

The very high standard set by this man- 
agement in presenting their first pictures 
could hardly always be adhered to. The 
present program shows a falling off. 

Dorothy Dalton and Rudolph Valentino 
attempt to vitalize one of Frank Norris' 
wild sea tales. Action abounds, death comes 
regularly as clockwork and the villain sur- 
vives to the last foot of film. But that is all. 
The comedy might have been improved with 
more humor and less waste. 

Prince Lei Lani, the "Hawaiian McCor- 
mick," does a good bit of entertaining, 
though his last selection might have been 
improved. Short features are included to fill 
in the gaps on the bill. 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

delightful stock company has earned her 
well merited praise in numerous instances, 
but this week her introductory acting is 
below her level. There is something needed 
in addition to a pretty face to hold the 
boards even in such a simple affair as the 
present one. We are surprised at her lack 
of appreciation of what little spirit there is. 




Comedies at California 

With the exception of the music, this 
week's bill is all comedy. Raymond Hatton 
leads in his uproarious presentation, "His 
Back Against the Wall." There is an abund- 
ance of humor, plenty of laughs and a lot 
that entertains. The funeral-faced Buster 
Keaton does a lot of work attempting to 
amuse with the old theme of the movie- 
built boat that is too large for the door, etc. 
This comedian has done a number of better 
films than the present one. 

Simondet and Veski are heard in two 
excellent musical numbers, their appearance 
being another example of the management's 
desire to furnish the patrons with good en- 
tertainment. Heller injects a little Tann- 
hauser into his part of the work. German 
music seems to be gradually creeping back 
into the repertoire of all high class orches- 
tras, which is a step forward. 



Imperial 

For the second week Mae Murray holds 
the silver sheet with her elaborate "Peacock 
Alley." A generous mixture of the usual 
and conventional, of the bizarre and im- 
possible, is this costly production. Miss 
Murray's support is worthy of a better con- 
ceived picture, though her followers will 
doubtless excuse the frailties of the pro- 
ducers in their delight at her personal ef- 
forts. Short features round out the bill, and 
Saslavsky completes his final week as leader 
of the orchestra. 



Alcazar— "Three Bears" 

Dudley Ayres, Brady Kline and Charles 
Yule make admirable bears, and Gladys 
George is an excellent Goldie-locks — to say 
nothing of Ben Erway as a half-breed guide. 
However, the plot of "The Three Bears" 
has little to recommend it, in spite of bits 
of excellent dialogue. 

Miss George, it is feared, has entirely 
missed the spirit of the author in the first 
scene. Her work as leading lady of this 



Stimulant at the Orphenm 

The importance of a title, O. Henry used 
to say, can hardly be over-estimated. 

A glance at the Orpheum's promised pro- 
gram for the week was enough to upset that 
resolution about keeping away from theaters 
during "flu-time" — the items did look so in- 
viting, and then, too, the Orpheum is always 
so perfectly ventilated that one has no mis- 
givings on that score. 

The evening turned out to be the jolliest 
your critic has spent for some time, and the 
best prescription for prevailing ailments — 
which vanished completely during those 
three hours. 

Ray started us off with an irresistable 
fox-trot, and then came the Aesop Fables 
screened, unfailingly amusing. Gymnasts 
followed. Two Zarrells by name, and a one- 
act play, "Dress Rehearsal," in its second 
week of unqualified success. The jazz band 
of Dave Harris is still in our midst, and I 
defy any "flu" germ to stand that racket! 
Genevieve Butler and Leo Flanders give an 
entertainment of considerable merit and 
great charm; her voice and his piano play- 
ing make an artistic combination. "The 
Gossipy Sex" is a clever little comedy, well 
done by Robert Emmett Keane and Claire 
Whitney. (Mr. Keane's name suggests in- 
teresting possibilities, either parents with 
patriotic and histrionic proclivities, or just 
a clever idea of his own.) "The Dancing 
Fool" is the usual sort of thing, you know; 
what's one fool more or less among the 
dance enthusiasts? Howard's pony and dog 
show was an agreeable interval to children 
and grown-ups alike. 



Warfield at the Columbia 

The character portrayal by David War- 
field in "The Return of Peter Grimm" is too 
well known to need any praise from this 
pen. How it has mellowed and grown finer 
with the years, and how the endearing per- 
sonality of the actor encompasses his audi- 
ence, those were the facts borne in upon the 
the critic on the first evening of Mr. War- 
field's present engagement at the Columbia, 
as the absorbingly interesting play prog- 
ressed quiedy and convincingly to its end. 
The increasing interest in things occult gives 
Peter Grimm a higher place than ever in the 
serious regard of the theater-goer, and the 
manner in which the theme is handled by 
author and actors satisfies both the student 



and the lidettante. Of course it is the su- 
preme acting of David Warfield that makes 
the play what it is, and the excellence of 
his art seems to have reached to the last 
word of his drama and to the innermost 
feelings of his company. Harmony, that 
most rare quality, prevails throughout the 
piece. 

The reception given to this great actor, 
and that greeting so hearty that went out 
to Marie Bates, expressed in part the mind 
of the large audience, but the greater por- 
tion of our appreciation was not to be told 
in hand-clapping or other visible signs. 
These very reservations helped to make the 
evening the artistic success that it was. 



Coming Attraction at Alcazar 

A beautiful comedy with quaint char- 
acters and unique situations is "Old Lady 
31," which has been selected as the next 
attraction at the Alcazar Theater, beginning 
with the Sunday matinee, February 26. 

While essentially a comedy with a good 
measure of fun, it has its serious moments 
and is filled with clever dialogue. Gladys 
George and Dudley Ayres will assume the 
stellar roles. There will be a group of char- 
acters who have almost reached the end of 
life, as well as some young people whose 
contrasting liveliness furnishes the spirit of 
happiness and joy abounding throughout the 
prologue and three acts into which the play 
is divided. 



Orpheum Next Week 

At the Orpheum next week the Langdon 
McCormicks' sensational play, "The Storm,' 
will be produced. The play ran for a year 
in New York. George N. Brown, the world's 
champion walker, will also appear on next 
week's bill He illustrates the best way to 
hike, having invented a machine like 
treadmill which works on the stage. Hikers, 
get pointers from him! Brown holds the 
world's record as a walker. 

Burt Gordon and Gene Ford will appear 
in their singing skit, "Recital Classique." 



SAM FRANCISCO 



W NAUOt*\u.fe 




i 



DArLY 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



February 25, 1922 

Also on next week's bill will be Cooper 
and Robinson, colored comedians, and Jess 
Liborati, master of the xylophone. 

Keane and Whitney will remain another 
week, as will Tom Patricola, the "Dancing 
Fool," and Irene Delroy and La Bernicia in 
their classic dance features. 



Vaudeville Performers Last Ten Years 

Sam Hogden, veteran head of the book- 
ing department of the Keith Circuit, com- 
menting on the average length of time a 
vaudeville player can hold the boards, says: 
"On the average a player can expect to be 
the darling of the gallery gods for ten years 
at the most. The player should save hard 
during those ten years, for after that he will 
slide back, and while he can still play in the 
smaller houses his earning power will have 
gone on the bias. 

"The length of distinguished service that 
a performer can give to vaudeville can be 
stretched out considerably if he keeps 
abreast of the times and makes his mind 
work for him. Lew Dockstader, for instance, 
is still a headliner because he always keeps 
on the mark with current events and is will- 
ing to pay good, solid money for his ma- 



PYRO-VOID 

DR. HOAGLAND'S HOME TREATMENT 
for 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTAL SPECIALIST 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Bstabllshad 11)03 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 

terial. To the credit of the present-day per- 
formers, it can be said that they are more 
anxious than the old-timers to keep up their 
work and not get lost in the dust of the 
procession." 



CELEBRATED DOCTOR PREFERS GOLF 

"Golf is the best exercise in the world," 
said Dr. Carlos F. MacDonald, the cele- 
brated alienist of New York, who recently 
played seventy-six holes on his seventy-sixth 
birthday. 

"I used to ride horseback a great deal, I 
was a pretty good tennis player, and I've 
spent a great many hours in gymnasiums; 
but the exercise one gets in those ways does 
not compare with the beneficial results one 
gets from eighteen or thirty-six holes of golf. 
I've dropped all other forms of exercise 
since I took up golf ten years ago, and I 
feel better today than I ever did." 



17 



ATTRACTS BUSINESS MEN 

As a luncheon place the Fairmont Hotel 
has advantages that attract business men. 
Though removed from all the noise of the 
business district, which it overlooks, it is 
only a few minutes away. The service is 
perfect, the surroundings ideal. 



THIS IS 
YOUR OPPORTUNITY 

A Small Investment Properly 
Invested Will Mean a Source of 
Fortune for Yourself or a Heri- 
tage for Your Heirs, as You 
Choose. 

a in w Syndicate is just being ton 
take nver ii large tract of Canadian 
I. amis located In British Columbia between 
two continental railroads just Bizteen miles 
above Qlasier Park, Montana. Gel on the 
Board of Directors with us. We are on 
the ground Boor. 

JOSEPH HARRIMAN 

litli Floor Merchant* Natl. Hank llUlg., 
n-2r, MARKET STRBfiT 
San Francisco, California 



PROPOSED KEY ROUTE BRIDGE 

Now that the Key Route people propose 
to do the thing that was obviously crying to 
be done, shorten the distance between Oak- 
land and San Francisco by building a bridge 
to Goat Island, would it be a feasible propo- 
sition to buy up a number of the old 
wooden hulls belonging to the Shipping 
Board and place them end to end, or along- 
side one another, and fill them with silt and 
stone and sink them to form a causeway to 
reach Goat Island? Seattle is busy with a 
scheme to use ships in this way to reach 
Mercer Island on Lake Washington. Twelve 
hulls will be placed stem to stern and the 
hulls will be filled with water to bring them 
to the required level. It is said that, in fresh 
water, these hulls will last twenty-five years. 
The proposal is said to have the endorse- 
ment of the Seattle Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Association of Engineers. The space to 
be bridged is about 3000 feet. 



The parish priest had dropped in to see 
one of his flock, and, to prove his kindly- 
interest in the family and all its members, 
he began to ask one of the little colleens 
how she was progressing at school. The 
usual questions as to the spelling of the in- 
teresting word "cat," and so forth, were put 
and answered. Then the priest turned to a 
more abstruse subject, geography. "Now. 
tell me, dear, what is a lake?" he asked. 
The little maid puckered her brows in 
thought for a moment. Then she said: 
"Plaze, yer rivirince, it's a kettle wid a hole 
in it." — Edinburgh Scotsman. 



A Slip of the Tongue — "Snowball" Jack- 
son had just returned from a trip. "Ah tell 
you, boys, it sho' am nice to be back home, 
catin' good home cookin'. My wife makes 
de bes' biscuit in de world." 

"She do! She do!" enthusiastically spoke 
up one of the group of darkies around him. 

"What's dat!" bellowed Snowball. "What 
you-all know 'bout my wife's biscuit?" 

"I don't mean she do!" quickly apolo- 
gized his friend; "I mean do she!" — Judge. 



"This magnate says that whenever he has 
a scheme in view, he always communicates 
his intentions to his wife." 

"That's a quick way of getting all the 
objections." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



Mr. Nagg — "I suppose now you wish you 
were free to marry again?" 

Mrs. Nagg — "No; just free." — London 
Mail. 




Service 

of 8000 people 

^A^HEN our cus- 
tomers push the 
button, they com- 
mand the services 
of over eight thou- 
sand people em- 
ployed by the P. 
G. and E. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



-FACirlC SMVICI- 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 25, 1922 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to 
select from at Marsh's, who is now permanently 
located at Post and Powell streets. 



Beauty Culture Taught 

Enroll Now 

Individual Instructions 

25 Years in Business 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 



Phones: Sutter 3169, Kearny 49~8 

United Flower & Supply Co.,Inc. 

FLORISTS 

AVe grow our own stock and, with exten- 
sive nurseries to draw from, can give 
unusual values. It will pay you to 
view our flowers and prices. 



44 S Bush Street 



San Francisco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or, if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
S7-45 First Street - - San Francisco 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone Park 271 



iimimbeam^ 



Checking Up — One morning a negro saun- 
tered into the office of a white friend. "Good 
mawnin', Mr. Withrow. Kin I use yo' phone 
a minute?" he asked. 

"Why, certainly, Sam." 

Sam called his number, and after a few 
minutes' wait, said, "Is this Mrs. Whiteside? 
Well, I seen in de papeh where you-all 
wanted a good cullud man. Is you still 
wantin' one? Then the man youse got is 
puffectly satisfactory, and you doesn't con- 
nemplate makin' no change soon? All right, 
ma'am. Good-bye." 

Mr. Withrow called to Sam as he left the 
phone, "Now that's too bad, Sam, that the 
place is filled." 

"Oh, dat's all right, Mr. Withrow. Ise de 
nigger what's got de job, but I's jest a 
wantin' to check up." 



Passing It Along — Pat Rooney had just 
opened a new home brew foundry, and as 
it was a rainy day there were quite a num- 
ber of Pat's friends in the place seeking 
shelter from the storm. 

An Englishman was standing at the bar 
with a worried look on his face, which an 
Irishman named Mike noticed. Mike asked 
him what the trouble was. 

"This beer is awful," said the Englishman, 
"but I wouldn't dare let it stand for fear 
Pat would be insulted." 

"You're right," said Mike, sympathetically, 
"but I have a scheme. That fellow next to 
you has a raincoat on. Pour it into his 
pocket." 

"But," said the Englishman, "he is liable 
to catch me in the act." 

"Not a chance in the world," said Mike, 
with a chuckle. "I just poured mine into 
your pocket." 



Not the Target — A motion picture com- 
pany from one of the studios in Los Angeles 
was out on location. In one of the big scenes 
some revenue officers with machine guns and 
sawed-off shotguns were supposed to open 
fire on the rum smugglers, who were to fire 
right back again. Finally everything was 
ready for the action. 

"Shoot at will!" shouted the director. 

The rattle of blank musketry filled the air. 
A gun-war whistled past the cameraman's 
exposed ear; scraps of cartridge material 
fell at his feet. 

"Hey, there!" he yelled. "The director 
said to shoot at Will. My name's George!" 



'The butler is incompetent and must go." 
"I can't let the butler go. He'll give away 
the family secrets." 

'There is no skeleton in our family." 
"I know that, wife. But I can't afford to 
have my friends know how much hootch I 
got in the cellar."— Louisville Courier-Jour- 
nal. 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

LUNCHEON 75c 
Served Daily — 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large 

menu, which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

FRENCH DINNER $1.50 

Including tax. week days and Sundays, 

5 to 9 p. m. 

DANCIXfi 

421 BUSH STREET, ABOVE KEARNY 

Phone: Douglas 3411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 
65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny ! :■■',: r, San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italiun Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. Leidesdorff 



Quality 1866—56 Years--1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

BurlUufame Redwood City Mcnlo Park 

Sum Mateo Wood side 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

Sun FranclHco Phone Market 910 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

lias a practic.il system of placing manu- 
Bcrfpts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Prank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 1 74 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Eyes Guaranteed 

Bother CZ^d) Work at 

You? 27 7th St. 

DR. J. P. JUHL 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Ivejirny 301 San Francisco 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1S17) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept., 1921 




25,000,000.00 
17,500,000.00 



25.000,000.00 



.$ 67,500,000.00 



$359,326,760.00 

OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

359 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31st, 1921 

Assets $ 71,851,299.62 

Deposits 68,201,299.62 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - 2,650,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ------ 371,753.46 

A Dividend of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4)4 ) per cent per annum was 
declared for the six months ending December 31, 1921. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PAUIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansorae Streets 

rhone Kearny 5600 
S;m Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 




Irrigation District Bonds 

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THEY ARE more secure than Orel mortgages became they rank ahead of 

lirst mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

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DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

Office of the United States Attorney 
District of Oregon 
Portland, Oregon 



November 30th, 1921. 



Keaton Tire & Rubber Company, 

Portland, Oregon. 
Gentlemen: 

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In my opinion, the greatest satisfaction derived from using Keaton Cords is due 
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friends; needless to say, the next set of tires which I purchase will be Keatons. 

Respectfully, 

(Signed) AUSTIN F. FLEGEL, JR., 

Assistant United States Attorney. 



Keaton Tire & Rubber Company 



SAN FRANCISCO 
636 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Prospect 324 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 1922 



LOS AN< 




Barlj San Francisco (No, 2) — The Plan of Fortification of Port GmmybagB 

The headquarters of the Vigilance Committee of '56 consisted of coarse sacks filled with sand and 
piled up as seen in the picture, nearly six feet thick and ten feet high. Cannon were placed at the 
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tained control of certain surrounding buildings from which they might control the situation by arms. 
To meet such an altack the Vigilantes placed cannon on the roof of Fort Gunnybags. These defenses 
could have been raided readily by a strong force, but the show of ample defense seemingly attained the 
Object of the organization The old stone building on the south side of Sacramento street, near Davis, 
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ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. XCX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 1 922 



No. 9 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Rusa Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas GS53. liutered at San Francisco, 
Calif.. Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year J5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 : Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— A motorist who killed a woman the other day insisted he was 
going only "eight miles an hour." The poor woman must have 
died from surprise. 

— Operation of dirigibles appears to be developing into the most 
expensive and sensational form of committing suicide. Dirigible 

ZR-2, the Roma. Next! 

* * * 

— The sixth annual automobile show has passed into pleasant 
remembrance, fine as it was, but the seventh will be even bigger 
and better in every way, and the public interest will be greater. 

* * * 

— Harry Brolaski, "the master mind" in bootlegging, now sen- 
tenced to two years' imprisonment and a fine of $1000, says he 
can show up huge graft in prohibition enforcement. It needs no 

"master mind" to show that! 

* ¥ # 

— A 4-year-old child was killed on the street this week, and the 
motorist ran away. Gangsters who got fifty years' sentence for their 
orgies did not merit it half as much as the runaway slayers of men, 

women and children. 

* * * 

— A candidate for State Assemblyman in Quincy, III., is can- 
vassing from an aeroplane. A candidate can canvass from anything 
this year, and be elected, if he convinces the voters he is for econ- 
omy and low taxes. 

•v * * 

The city fire department has stood the severest tests, says one 

of our esteemed contemporaries. Yes, if letting the city burn up 
several times, as. for instance, in 1906, was a test. The department 
is all right, but the politicians who try to run it are all wrong. 

* * * 

—Two hundred representative residents of San Mateo. Burlmgame 
and Hillsborough have visited Governor Stephens at Sacramento 
and demanded removal of Harbor Commissioner F. S. Moody for 
his alleged selfish efforts to bridge Channel street and obstruct pub- 
lic travel. That's the way to get official action on complaints. 

* * * 

—Motorists continue to run down people and run away. After 
awhile it will perhaps be made a state prison matter, and there will 
be less of it. Nobody is immune from accidents, but striking down 
a man. woman M child, and leaving the luckless pedestrian to lie 
dying on the roadway, is a crime which excites nothing but anger. 



— Now the Board of Supervisors wants another $10,000 for the 
unemployed. Will they set the wage at $8 a day to promote their 
popularity? 

— Another blow to "State sovereignty." The United States has 
decided that State Railroad Commissions cannot impose unreason- 
able terms on interstate carriers. "Commerce does not regard State 
lines." Eminently proper. 

— The newspapers are giving pictures to show how pedestrians 
run into motor collisions. They should also show how the grocers' 
and butchers' wagons skim corners at sixty miles an hour, and big 
trucks fail to stop when passengers are alighting from street cars. 

— Ray Benjamin is back from Washington and says Sam Short- 
ridge will stump the State for Hiram Johnson — if he needs it. Who 
could give him a walk, much less a run? Jim Phelan has other fish 
to fry besides wasting more money on Senatorial honors. 

— -Probably the last thing desired by New York Congressmen who 
demand that Ambassador Harvey be recalled is that the demand 
be granted. Better politics to have Harvey retained, so that they 
can continue to kick over his friendly attitude towards John Bull. 

— The further Dick Hotaling gets in his exploration of the 
tangled jungle of litigation, the more thorny the road. Heirs of a 
rich estate should hold a caucus before going into court, and decide 
on the particular charity to which they wish to give the family 
estate, instead of having the lawyers buy limousines and country 

homes with it. 

* * * 

— Can any decent citizen, with a spark of humanity and patriot- 
ism in his composition, object to the President's sincere efforts to 
promote peace and prosperity, instead of possible strife and misery, 
on the Pacific? But there are men who do. and still call themselves 
statesmen. Bolshevists would be a better name for such selfish 
politicians. 

* * * 

— Mormon elders, preaching their doctrines in England, have 
been mobbed like "Pussyfoot" Johnson, the Volstead apostle. Give 
John Bull credit for not letting joblot propagandists from foreign 
parts disturb his social arrangements. Here we hail all trouble- 
makers as public benefactors, and invite them to address Common- 
wealth Club and tell us all they don't know in the newspapers. 

* * * 

Now we shall have a loud cry from the legislation fans for a 

new law to prevent air stunts because an acrobat's parachute didn't 
open and he fell 3000 feet. All air flights should be limited to 
three feet, or under, and a bureau with ten million dollars appro- 
priation appointed to enforce the regulation. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 4, 1922 




MENTION 




In a Washington's Day speech 
Peace Hovers on Uneasy Wings to the Chicago Council of the 

"Friends of Irish Freedom," who 
represent the De Valera shade of Irish-American politics. United 
States Senator Reed of Missouri took the same old stand of Demo- 
cratic poliiicians ever since the Irish vote in America became an 
important asset of political bosses. 

Senator Reed's speech contained no new idea. That is not re- 
markable, for men with new ideas cannot be elected to the United 
States Senate from the Solid Soulh, which in the last twenty-five 
years has lynched more negroes than there were white executions 
by law. Not a few of the unfortunate niggers were burned alive. 

It is to the interest of politicians like Senator Reed that the 
"Irish vote" in America shall be kept intact, and it seems to them 
the surest method is to twist the tail of the British lion and weep 
crocodile tears over the sufferings of the Revolutionary army, which 
made John Bull strike his colors and skedalle 150 years ago. That's 
the stuff te make the votes drop into the Democratic ballot box. 

Naturally, Senator Reed picked on Ambassador Harvey as the 
thesis of his oration. Brother Harvey seems to have been made to 
order for Democratic orators to rage over, and Sena'.or Reed cer- 
tainly simulated a fine passion in reminding American patriots and 
Irish-American exiles of the many facts and much fiction that 
America and England had better, for humanity's sake, give timely 
burial. 

The most serious obstacles to Irish peace and prosperi'y is the 
interference of American politicians in the affairs of Ireland. Left 
to themselves, the Irish will no doubt establish an orderly govern- 
ment, and restore the agricultural and commercial prosperity they 
had before the Sinn Fein revolu'ion. The Irish income tax was the 
lowest in the world. The land laws were beneficial, thanks to the 
efforts of patriotic and intelligent Irish representatives working ever 
since the days of Parnell. It was the hope of the farmers of Ireland, 
who are the backbone of prosperity, that their country might be 
saved from the interference of American politicians, and allowed 
to find its own road to satisfactory political conditions. 

The Friends of Freedom, before whom Senator Reed has been 
orating of ancient history, claims to have financed the campaign of 
De Valera in the United States. To accomplish that purpose they 
sold a large amount of bonds, and in all probability will sell more, 
to carry on the agitation for a free Irish republic. The head of the 
New York branch of the Friends of Freedom is a political judge, a 
good citizen in his way, but perhaps his way would not be the same 
as the farmers of Ireland, who fear resumption of the drastic mili- 
tary conditions that recently injured their country. 

With a bond-selling political organization in operation in the 
United States to aid De Valera, and United States orators recruiting 
the Democratic vote on the eve of our Congressional elections, 
Peace hovers on uneasy wings over the Green Isle. 



The yellow race is making 
Look to Your Laurels, White Man headway. The white man will 

have to look to his laurels. 
Since the days of Alexander the Great, who conquered Asia as far 
as he went from Greece wi'.h a handful of men, white conquerors 
have had things their own way east of the Red Sea. But Japan 
has awakened in the Asiatic soul a desire for emulation. India, 
inspired by the advance of Japan and the example of little Ireland 
in attaining free-state distinction, is demanding in slronger tones 



recognition in her government. Heretofore the personnel of Indian 
government has been British, with a sprinkling of native Hindoos. 
The finest positions in the Indian Civil Service were open to bril- 
liant British university men. Their competitive examinations were 
the most severe in the world. The salaries of the victors were large, 
and their positions as governors and other functionaries very attrac- 
tive. Only the most brilliant university men could hope for success 
in the Indian Civil Service competitive examinations. 

Now native Indian university men are taking part successfully in 
these difficult tests of higher scholarship, the examinations having 
been thrown open to them. In the latest examination, in which 
eighty-six participated, thirteen Indians were successful and only 
three British aspirants. What becomes of the theory that the white 
man's intellectuality is omniscient? A West Indian negro recently 
won the Goncourt prize at Paris for the best novel. That was not 
so significant, as fiction is a matter on which judges may easily 
differ. But the Indian Civil Service examinations for British uni- 
versity men are known the world over as the most difficult tests of 
general scholarship in the classics, mathematics and languages, 
including European and Oriental. Only one in a thousand of uni- 
versity graduates could hope to win in such a contest. Yet the 
Hindoos excelled. 



Editor Brisbane, the $150,000 editor 
Be Patient, Brother Brisbane of the Hearst newspapers, is con- 
temptuous of Frank A. Munsey of 
the New York World, for printing on his first page the following 
reference on the soldiers' bonus: "A hundred billions of dollars 
before we are out of debt, and now Congress proposes to mulct us 
for five billions more for the bonus." 

No wonder Editor Brisbane sniffs in contempt at the sordid petti- 
ness of his contemporary. One would think from Publisher Mun- 
sey's wail that five billions was worth talking about. If it were 
fifty, or five hundred, billions, there might be some excuse for 
Munsey's kick. Yes, indeed. But Brother Brisbane should temper 
his wind to the shorn lamb and not burn him up with a dry blizzard 
of scorn for his parsimonious objections. Not every editor can afford 
to be so lordly in his estimates of monetary values as Brother 
Brisbane, whose boss inherited twenty millions in cash as well as 
the million acres in Mexican land, and is ready to stake it all on 
the off chance of being elected President by the Bolshevist vote. 



In explanation of several prisoners having 
Prison Mismanagement escaped from San Quentin prison, it is 
stated that they were guilty of "a breach 
of confidence." When we are busier providing baseball games, 
movie shows and revivals for San Quentin convicts than teaching 
them useful trades and making our prisons self-supporiing, it is not 
wonderful that there are jail breaks and breaches of parole. 

Our prisons everywhere are a blot on civilization. Any young 
man may be misled and sent to jail. It is the duty of the State to 
try and make him better, instead of worse. What do we do to 
improve him? We allow a lot of half-baked theorists to make the 
young convict a confirmed no-account, and' possible drug addict, by 
treating him as if he were a freshman of a jerkwater college, whose 
career is punctuated by ball games, frat socials, boxing matches 
and lectures on psycho-analysis. 

Convicts should be put to work at once on some useful trade, so 
that when their sentences have been served they may be better fitted 



March 4. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



for the struggle of life — better educated in the true sense of the 
term, and more likely to lead better lives. 

Hitherto, the union influence of the closed shop has operated 
against the learning of trades by convicts. The cry of the leaders 
of organized labor has been that convict labor should not be al- 
lowed to compete in the market with the products of free labor. 
Thus the convict has been doomed to unskilled labor, or idleness, 
which has left him a worse man. At the end of his term he has 
been given a few dollars and a suit of clothes, and turned loose, to 
return to his old ways. 

If given some useful trade and some return on his labor in prison, 
after payment of his board, he would have money to keep him 
until he found work on regaining his freedom. The closed shop 
form of industrialism, which has helped to make State prisons 
human pens and schools of crime, has been a drawback to civili- 
zation in many ways. 



The defeat of universal suffrage in the 
Not Unmixed Blessing Japanese Diet by 288 to 159 is the best 
thing that could have happened to Japan. 
That country has been going far too fast in imitation of Western 
politics. Suffrage is one of the blessings of the Occidental world 
which isn't half as blessed as Japanese reformers imagine, or pre- 
tend to worship. Theoretically, universal suffrage is the finest ex- 
pression of human equality, but men are not equal, naturally, or 
otherwise, and may never be. Even in wild Nature, the big bison 
is master of the herd. The largest and wisest gander leads the flock 
of wild geese. In human democracies the vote of the best citizen 
counts for no more than that of the hobo who sleeps in a wood box 
and begs his breakfast. Could anything be more absurd? 

What America needs most is a limitation of suffrage in munici- 
pal elections, to prevent people who have no direct or indirect inter- 
est in the prosperity of the community from voting on public 
indebtedness and crushing the industrious citizens under a load of 
taxes. One of the greatest mistakes the United States has made 
was in opening the United States Senate to demagogues by pro- 
viding that Senators shall be elected by direct vote. The greatest 
of all errors would be direct vote for President, of which every 
wrong-headed reformed and violent and selfish demagogue is now 
dreaming. 



Rural community development is one 
Do Something Besides Talk of the State's needs, declares the Com- 
monwealth Club. Instead of frittering 
away its large influence, why does not the Commonwealth Club stick 
to a few great subjects, like improvement of our State judiciary 
and the lowering of the tax rate? 

Nothing surpasses in importance the establishment of economy 
in our State government, but for years the State has been an all- 
devouring monster, threatening ruin of the people who pay the bills. 

Reorganization of our judiciary is as much needed as govern- 
mental economy. Great crimes against the citizens are made pos- 
sible by continuing the plan of electing our judges— even Chief 
Justices of our Supreme Court. Judges should be appointed, as are 
Federal judges, and pensions provided for them. In California, with 
a population of less than three millions, we have more judges than 
England, Ireland and Scotland, with nearly twenty times as many 
people. Forty County Circuit judges do most of the work for 
England with its forty millions. We will soon have forty judges in 
San Francisco County alone, judging by the rate we are going. The 
drawing of juries and grand juries by judges elected because of 
their political activities is worthy of Darkest Africa. 

Upon that reform the Commonwealth Club could concentrate its 
influence with great benefit to the community and credit to itself. 
It is too bad to have fine clubs remain mere lyceums of chatter, 
without attainment of any high civic or intellectual purpose. 



The use of the emergency fund for the 

The Development of Sunset unemployed, to start the construction 

of municipal railroad extensions for 

development of , the Sunset District, has been advocated in the 

Board of Supervisors. 

No doubt the emergency fund can be used on useful public 
work, but before plunging into extensive railroad projects it would 
be advisable to see what the voters wish to do with the offer of the 
Market Street Railway Company to sell its properties on easy terms 
to the city. If the people conclude to buy the private lines and 
consolidate them in the municipal system already started, great 
saving could be made for the taxpayers. We should then have 
co-operation instead of costly rivalry. 

In the development of the Sunset District the saving would be 
enormous, for the Market Street Company has the Haight street line 
running from the ferry to the ocean beach. By proper connection 
with the contemplated tunnel on Duboce avenue, the Market street 
line extension south of Golden Gate Park in Sunset could be made 
enormously valuable in affording all parts of Sunset rapid transit 
at comparatively small cost. Sunset is destined to become the great 
residential district of San Francisco as soon as the difficulties of 
rapid transportation to and from downtown are overcome by the 
Duboce tunnel. Already we have the Twin Peaks tunnel in opera- 
tion. With both in operation it will be but a matter of a few min- 
utes for Sunset dwellers to board a tunnel car and shop downtown. 

The private railway company has not been in position to push 
the railroad development of Sunset, owing to the public policy of 
discouragement of private ownership of car lines. Now, with the 
prospect of private and municipal lines in co-operation. Sunset will 
undergo a magical change. It will rival in building activity the 
wonderful growth of Richmond, notwithstanding all its cemeteries. 
There are no cemeteries to obstruct home building in Sunset. 

Until it is definitely decided whether we shall have street railroad 
unity and civic progress, or continue the protracted rivalry and 
hostility so injurious to the public interests, we had better not spend 
our emergency fund on pioneering railroad work which may be 
undesirable. 



The Hearst newspapers are scornful of the 
The Royal Marriage royal marriage in London. "A young girl, 

similar to any boarding house miss, and a 
man who never worked for a living," comments the standing candi- 
date for President. Admitting that dynastic monarchies are out of 
date and its social spectacles empty pageants, how much better is 
our vaunted government by and for (he people? We waste more 
than any monarchy, and in trying to pull everybody down to a 
common level we are continually lowering the standard of govern- 
ment. We spent three and a half billions in creating a merchant 
marine, and after running it at a loss of $60,000,000 a year we 
are trying to give away the ships. In twenty-five years we have 
lynched more people — burning many of them to death — than we 
have executed murderers by order of court. We have 15,000 mur- 
ders a year, and our liberties are so few on account of pestiferous 
fanatics regulating our morals that we doubt if the right to object 
be not a State prison offense. 

Before pointing out to the Britishers how silly their harmless sur- 
vival of royal pageants appears to us, we should take a sidelong 
glance at our own reflection in the mirror. Paraphrasing the im- 
mortal words of Bobby Burns, "would that we could turn the 
microscope on ourselves when we put on airs. 



President Harding's message to Congress this week advocating 

a ship subsidy is a wonderful benefit to our great seaport. So is 
the treaty with Japan, which the Examiner is trying to block. 



6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 4, 1922 



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IT has been shown in the United States Senate by Borah of 
Idaho that the United States has not been neglectful of the 
disabled veterans of the war, notwithstanding the constant cry of 
agitators that the national neglect has been shameful. 

In 1918 we appropriated $179,287,800 for allowance of benefits 
on account of soldiers and sailors who participated in the World 
War. 

In 1919 we appropriated $89,253,833. 

In 1920 we appropriated $305,193,993. 

In 1921 we appropriated $271,619,400. 

In 1922 we appropriated $330,250,400. 

Making a total for those five years of $1,175,605,426. 

Within a few weeks Congress passed another appropriation of 
$406,038,844. That does not read like national neglect of the 
American soldier. In addition to these appropriations, there are 
several large deficiency bills before Congress. It is a conservative 
estimate that $500,000,000 will be appropriated for the coming 
year to take care of our soldiers who suffered disabilities. 

"These appropriations," Senator Borah said the other day, "rep- 
resent only a beginning. The amount which we are now appro- 
priating will continue to grow very rapidly for the next thirty — 
possibly fifty — years. I venture to say that within the next ten 
years we will be appropriating $1 ,500,000,000 a year for the dis- 
abled soldiers and sailors of the late war. No one will complain so 
long as the appropriations are based upon the necessities and the 
requirements of the disabled soldiers; and I call attention to the 
matter only that we may know something of the burden which we 
are compelled to assume and which we will be under obligations to 
take care of from year to year. We will not shirk the duty, I trust, 
but we ought not to place ourselves in a position where it may 
become practically impossible for us to meet it as we should. 

"These young men who came home, many of them, thousands of 
them, and it may run into hundreds of thousands of them, suppos- 
ing that they were in good health, uninjured, and unimpaired in 
mind or body, find and will find that subtle diseases were contracted 
or injuries received or the hardships they were compelled to un- 
dergo have undermined their health and many times shattered their 
minds. 

"Day by day the number we will have to take care of is increas- 
ing, and for years will increase. I think it is perfectly reasonable 
to say that this sum will increase from year to year until it will 
reach at least $1,500,000,000 a year in a few years. Even this 
amount may be greatly increased. 

"As an illustration, I go back a moment and review the increase 
of pension appropriations for the Civil War veterans. When we 
compare the appropriations made for the Civil War veterans and 
the percentage of increase and the number of years through which 
the appropriations increased it is perfectly safe to say that before 
this Government shall have discharged its obligation to the wounded 
or disabled soldiers the taxpayers of this country will have met an 
obligation of at least $75,000,000,000. Conservative experts have 
estimated it at $100,000,000,000. That sum seems so staggering 
and so stupendous that I hesitate to prophesy that we will reach 
that sum, but I do not know by what process we can reason it 
down below $75,000,000,000. 

"Look for a moment at the Civil War pension appropriations. 
In 1875, ten years after the close of the Civil War. our appropria- 



tion bill for pensions was $29,980,000. That was ten years after 
the conflict. We are now appropriating $500,000,000 within four 
years after the World War. In 1898, and prior to the Spanish War, 
we appropriated for the veterans of the Civil War $141,263,880. 
From 1875 to 1898 there had been this large increase; and in 
1921, fifty-six years after the Civil War, we appropriated $279,- 
150,000 for pensions. If, therefore, we compare the rate of in- 
crease, taking into consideration the larger number with whom we 
shall have to deal and the greater seriousness of the war as to 
injuries and wounds, we shall arrive readily at the conclusion that 
the amount of money which I have suggested as the probable 
amount which the taxpayers will have to meet is a reasonable 
figure. 

"One of the reasons why I am opposed to the bonus bill is be- 
cause even with the large sums which we are now appropriating I 
do not believe that we are doing all that we ought to do by the 
disabled soldiers, and this bonus will make it more difficult to 
discharge that duty." 



A VICTORY FOR THE OPEN SHOP 

"It will interest many of our citizens," says the Portland Spec- 
tator, "to learn that it required a decision of a state supreme court 
to make it possible for the owner of a business to work in his own 
shop. Of course, a few of our wage-payers knew that Portland's 
'conservative' labor leaders had refused them this privilege, and 
had called strikes on plants in which the owner or partners had the 
audacity to do work that could be performed by a closed shop 
unionist. Under the shield of the supreme court decision, these 
wage-payers may now venture into their own shops to take a turn 
at lathe or forge, and, if they are very wary and fortunate, will 
escape the bodily harm incurred by their fellows in the past. It was 
the Supreme Court of Minnesota that declared the owner of a plant 
should not, by the conservative labor leaders, be deprived of the 
right to work in it." 

Th plaintiff in the case ran a motion picture house in Minneapolis 
and, being a first class operator, undertook to work the machine. 
His closed shop employes objected. 



BRITISH GROWING SERIOUS TOWARDS GANDHI 

"One month of unrestricted Gandhiism," says the London Ob- 
server, "would drag India down below the level of any country in 
the world, much below the level of Russia in its depth of chaos 
after the military debacle. Gandhi has measured for us the distance 
yet to be traveled before India reaches fully responsible govern- 
ment. He is at the same time a portent justifying and encouraging 
the steps already taken in that direction. 

"By threatening the very foundations of the organized life of his 
country, Gandhi himself has illuminated and confirmed our duty to 
India and to ourselves. We have less justification than ever for its 
abandonment. When in the course of years India has reached 
mature development of the spirit and institutions of free and stable 
government — not necessarily in exact correspondence with western 
models — a Gandhi will get no hearing. The response of the masses 
lo his teaching today is an exhortation to educated India and to 
the British administrator to speed co-operation and the discharge 
of their common duty." 



March 4, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



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frj A PEOPLE who really believed in human liberty would fight 
_l\_ against prohibition," declares Elmer L. Rice, dramatic 
author of several successful plays. The American people submit to 
all kinds of tyrannies, he says as an American of many generations. 
"The early settlers in America," Dramatist Elmer says, "thought 
they came here for religious freedom, but they didn't ; the first thing 
they did was to prohibit religious freedom, punishing those who 
didn't worship in their particular way. The joke of it is that a lot 
of Americans use the word 'liberty' just as though they knew what 
it meant." 

Censorship of the movies does not appeal to Dramatist Rice. Not 
that he thinks the movies are good. The so-called drama of the 
screen is mostly trash. The propaganda is false. The theaters them- 
selves are poorly ventilated. The films are generally bad for the 
eyes. But the spectacle of the censors trying to measure the decency 
of the moving pictures furnishes the most absurd spectacle that was 
ever given in a civilized country. So says Mr. Rice. He adds: 

"In Pennsylvania, for instance, the censors struggled for a long 
time with the problem of the kiss. They didn't like to forbid kissing 
entirely, as the kiss is more or less of an established institution; but 
they were out to stop suggestive or immoral kissing, and the ques- 
tion was how long a moral kiss could be. Eventually they decided 
that eight feet of film was all that could be allowed, and the eight- 
foot kiss is now moral in Pennsylvania. A ten-foot kiss, however, 
under any circumstances, is vicious. 

"Motherhood and all reference to motherhood was verboten on 
the screen. Motherhood, it seems, is not an established institution 
in Pennsylvania. The censors pointed out that Pennsylvania chil- 
dren believed that babies were brought by storks, and they couldn't 
think of upsetting this beautiful tradition. So one picture which 
showed a prospective mother knitting baby clothes was cut out. The 
censors failed to observe, apparently, that even if the stork did 
bring 'em, they would still need clothes. 

"It was also decreed in Pennsylvania that no picture indicating 
an illicit domestic life should be permitted. And then some pro- 
ducer attempted to film Camille; and the censors insisted that 
Camille and Armand must, in the name of decency, be married. So 
their marriage was duty filmed and the censors were appeased; and 
the play as censored led up to the beautiful climax where the moral 
father insisted that Armand leave his lawful wife in order to marry 
a wealthy woman. 

"In Kansas they are not content with sex censorship, but have 
prohibited the showing of any violation of law upon the screen. 
And in Kansas, remember, cigarette smoking is a violation of the 
law. In another State a picture was elided because it showed a 
man burning a letter from his wife. The censors said that he might 
tear the letter up. but burning it seemed to bring marriage into 
contempt." 

As to censoring pictures so that they shall not be suggestive. 
Dramatist Rice says it all depends on the state of mind of the peo- 
ple who look at them. To the pure, all things are pure. 

"A person with an obscene mind simply fastens it on something 
that excites him. Takf an undraped figure away and he finds one 
partially draped. Take that away and he is capable of just as 
much excitement in looking at one which is fully clothed^ You 
don't even help such a person by putting his eyes out, for his 
imagination goes on just the same. The obscenity does not exist 
in the object at all, but in the mind of the beholder. Some people 



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are so obscene that they see smut in every book on sex problems 
or in every picture of love. 

"If we only believed in liberty, if we only had any faith in 
human life, if we were only willing to kick off the lid and allow 
everybody to see what life is like, to let even the children ask 
questions and to help them get their questions answered, obscenity, 
like witchcraft, would soon disappear. As things do become uncov- 
ered, in fact, they cease to be connected with obscenity. A few 
years ago ankles were terribly immoral, but nice, round knees are 
not immoral today, excepting to those people who are still living 
back in the ankle age. Obscenity is the creature of the Great Taboo 
and the censor is its priest. 

"In the meantime, poor, foolish New York is suffering from this 
recrudescence of witchcraft and hasn't the slightest idea what to 
do about it. It has had its refreshments taken away, its gayety 
squelched, its right to discover what life is like prohibited at every 
turn. A girl can't even swim at a New York beach as she can in 
Southern California or even in supposedly Puritan Massachusetts. 
She must bundle up with a lot of heavy togs, while a policeman 
stands by with a yardstick to see that her skirts are sufficiently 
superfluous. Everywhere we have given up the right to live and 
have appointed committees to supervise our conduct. We have sub- 
mitted to censorship on every hand; and when another one is pro- 
posed we surrender without a struggle. Nothing but a vision of 
liberty can break this spell." 



THE FOUNDER OF EUGENIC SCIENCE 

Few men's doctrines can be said to have advanced as rapidly 
within ten years of their propounder's death as those of Francis 
Galton, founder of the science of eugenics. This is the centenary 
of his birth. 

In the years 1850-80 the great battle for the acceptance of the 
general principle of evolution was fought, and the whole of biologi- 
cal science reconstituted under the inspiration of Gallon's cousin, 
the great scientist, Charles Darwin. 

Galton forecast the possibility of supermen. The doctrine that 
man by studying the laws of heredity and the influences of environ- 
ment could learn how to modify his species was the fundamental 
result of Galton's life work. It was an outcome of Darwin's labors, 
but it went beyond Darwin's horizon. "Let us set to and create a 
new man," was Galton's idea, and the more he pondered on it, the 
more convinced he became of its possibility and its essential impor- 
tance. But Galton did not merely proclaim his doctrine as a new 
truth, as a new religious belief, but he saw what was essential; he 
grasped that a new science was needful patiently to study the parts 
played by Nurture and Nature in the development of man. He 
called this new science National Eugenics, and he left to the Uni- 
versity of London the residue of his property to found a laboratory 
for national eugenics. 

Galton's idea, like all new ideas, at first met with ridicule, then 
uith tolerance, and finally with world-wide acceptance. America, 
ever desirous of being among the pioneers, established its eugenics 
record office and has its "Galton Society." Eugenics journals for 
the study of the new science have been started in France, in Hol- 
land and in South America. Eugenetic societies have, mushroom- 
like, sprung up from New Zealand to India and from India to 
Scandinavia. Nay, in all the Scandinavian countries we now find 
state-supported institutes for the study of Galton's science. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 4, 1922 




HER 






— Notwithstanding all our free schools and text books and uni- 
versities, we have the largest crop of intellectual fakirs in the world. 
We have "professors" of everything but honest, hard work. We try 
to "standardize" everything, including free public education, but 
the standard of real education was set higher three hundred years 
ago than today, with all our fuss over it. There were not so many 
mediocre pedants accepted as fine scholars, but those who were 
rated as in the first rank of scholarship were veritable giants of 
intellect. There was high culture for the few who sought it, and 
the many were content to build houses, plow fields and raise strong, 
healthy carpenters, blacksmiths and plowmen. Are we so much 
better off in our superficial and expensive environment? Do the 
few fine lawyers and doctors and preachers we graduate repay us 
for the money invested on ornamental education of plumbers and 
teamsters and shoe clerks? We need to take a week off and ponder 
on our fad of over-educating the multitude, which wants no more 
than "the three r's." 

Shakespeare was only a man of the people, with limited educa- 
tion, but what modern dramatist has reached his grade of universal 
wisdom and his beauty of language? Moliere, the Shakespeare of 
France, three hundred years ago, was the son of an upholsterer 
and remained as a strolling actor for fifteen years. Yet his plays 
are masterpieces. When we compare the works of educated men 
of the days of Shakespeare with the educated writers of today we 
despair of popular education. The poets and philosophers of 
ancient Greece two thousand years ago transcend the present-day 
output of literature as far as Macaulay's essays transcends evening 
paper homilies on Fatty Arbuckle. 

— It used to be that one could not take up a newspaper without 
finding something about John D. Rockefeller. Now it's Henry Ford. 
Why do all our American editors get crazy on the same subject at 
the same moment? Stephen Lausanne, the celebrated French jour- 
nalist, mentioned it recently in an article on his visit to Washing- 
ton. He said that what one American editor did, all the fraternity 
imitated, like sheep jumping over a fence. The French practice is 
to seek originality instead of imitation. The rivalry in writing up 
Fatty Arbuckle and the Los Angeles movie murder are examples 
of our journalistic passion for iteration and reiteration, ad nauseam. 
"Chewing the rag" would be a more appropriate term. 

— The fuss over Henry Ford and the rivalry of the editors to 
make him out a superman is worse than the unending slams at John 
D. Rockefeller because he represented riches. Politics and popular 
journalism are based on the theory that success demands continual 
catering to the prejudices of the mob. The people who are wasteful 
and poor are more numerous than those who are frugal and pay 
their bills. For twenty years, owing to the influence of demagogues 
organizing the labor vote and the Bolshevist vote, the banker was 
held up to the scorn of the country as the most unworthy sample 
of American citizenship. The Bible saying, "It is easier for a camel 
to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the 
kingdom of heaven," was the text of all commentaries on bankers 
and "captains of industry." Every dramatic thriller had a banker 
or corporation president as the double-dyed villain. The noble hero 
of the piece was invariably a stalwart and high-minded young 
house-painter or stationary engineer in overalls, whose patriotism 
and heroic civic pride eventually won him election to the Board of 



Aldermen, where he could baffle the villain's plans to grab a fat 
franchise and soak him an assessment tax for widening his sidewalk. 

— Now the breezes of popular propaganda are wafted in a differ- 
ent direction, and it is tacitly admitted that a banker may be a 
good citizen and have red blood in his veins, instead of ice water. 
John D. Rockefeller is allowed to play golf without hostile reporters 
on the horizon watching to see if he bullied a caddy or gave him 
a quarter with a hole in it. 

— Henry Ford, who runs John D. a close race in the accumula- 
tion of millions, is being hailed as a superman of mechanical genius 
and financal omniscience. 

¥ 9 flp 

— As a matter of fact, Mr. Ford is only an impressive proof of 
the proverb that a large manufacturer who produces wares of good 
quality at the lowest possible cost is sure to make millions. Instead 
of figuring on a limited market for expensive cars at large profits, 
Henry Ford produces the cheapest and best car in the world for 
the price. And he selected as the scene of his operations Detroit, 
the first large town in the United States to permit manufacturing 
on the open shop plan. He chose the psychological moment, and 
the right location for his venture, and excellent judgment has won 
him collosal success. He might have selected San Francisco and 
lost twenty-five years waiting for the community to wake up and 
get rid of the union profiteers running our City Hall and the closed 
shop influence that pulled us down while Los Angeles was pulling 
up. But it is wafting away like a summer fog. 



UNITED STATES' SEARCH FOR TRADE 

"Lord Riddell lays great stress upon the powerful movement now 
on foot for extending the operations of American foreign trade," 
says the London Daily Telegraph. "American rivalry in the world's 
markets was no new thing to this country before the war, but its 
proportions were limited by the activity of the vast home market 
in the United States, which absorbed the greater part of American 
production. 

"Lord Riddell bids us be prepared for new developments which 
will greatly enlarge the volume of American export trade. America 
is anxious to develop her foreign business in manufactured goods; 
and what America is anxious to do she will spare no effort to carry 
out. Lord Riddell does not refer to one of the reasons for this 
movement, which is that the United States is feeling very acutely 
the loss of wealth resulting from the war, and the economic world 
conditions following up the war. The American people have suf- 
fered an economic crisis actually worse, in some respects, than we 
have experienced here. 

"It is estimated that the national income is about one-half of 
what it was two years ago; while the burden of taxation, though 
considerably less than that which we are struggling to support, is 
seriously oppressive, and felt with peculiar bitterness by a people 
unaccustomed to an income tax. The home market is unable to 
absorb the product of American industry; agriculture, in particular, 
in which some 40 per cent of the nation are directly or indirectly 
concerned, is impoverished to an extent unprecedented in i's his- 
tory. The industrial producer is obliged to look abroad. But there 
he finds himself confronted with the conditions which have raised 
so terrible a problem for those engaged in British export trads, 
which always was, as that of the United States was not, a vital 
interest. 

"The formerly vigorous markets of Europe are almost lifeless. It 
is here that the instinctive American recoil from the idea of any 
engagement in European affairs comes into conflict wi'h a national 
need, the nature of which is clear enough to American financiers 
and industrialists, but still, apparently, unappreciated by the wider 
public." 



March 4, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



IMPORTING OLD HOUSES 

Several houses complete in every detail, dating from the sixteenth 
century, have recently been imported from England. Lovers of the 
antique may enjoy the! unique experience of living in the actual 
rooms which were built and decorated three centuries or more ago, 
and be within convenient commu'ing distance of New York. Such 
homes are naturally expensive, for the original cost is not only con- 
siderable, but the cost of transportation, the tariff and the expense 
of rebuilding are naturally great. 

An English firm makes a specialty of selling these houses and 
keeps a number of them on hand in their show place near London 
for inspection. When an old house is to be torn down to make 
room for some improvement, the building is bought in, usually for 
a nominal sum. After being carefully taken apart, it is rebuilt in 
the show place near London ready for the inspection of purchasers. 
If it is bought by an American, for instance, the house is once more 
taken down and packed with care for shipment. This work is done 
by experts, so that the parts, especially the woodwork, will not be 
injured. The English builders usually come to America to set up 
the house exactly as it originally stood in England. In some in- 
stances these old houses have been surrounded with English gar- 
dens, reproducing the original setting in England of centuries past. 



POLITICS VERSUS BANKING 

The proposed amendment to the Federal Reserve Act increasing 
the membership of the Federal Reserve Board from seven to eight, 
for the purpose of enabling the President to add a "dirt farmer" to 
the present membership, has passed the Senate and is expected to 
pass the House, although it is safe to say that few members of 
either body believe it to be good legislation. 

Nobody is alarmed about the direct results likely to ensue from 
having a farmer on the Board. The President doubtless will appoint 
an intelligent man, who will learn from his experience on the Board, 
if he does not know already, that the banking policies which best 
serve the interests of the whole country are also best for the farm- 
ers. The proposition is objectionable, not because competent farmers 
for the position may not be found, but because the arguments ad- 
vanced for the appointment of a farmer have been thoroughly 
demagogic and unsound. 




For Spring Wear 

An unusually complete range of Imported 

Madras, Cheviot and Poplin Shirtings in 

the piece for cutting to the 

individual measure. 



D. C. HEGER 

Maker of Kxclusivr Shirts 

liii-lis urtiiw STREET s\\ FRANCIS* 




From 
Coast to Coast 

SUNSET 
ROUTE 

San Francisco to New Orleans 

Via Los Angeles, El Paso, Tucson, 
San Antonio and Houston 

WITH 

Southern Pacific Steamer Connection 
to New York 

(Sailing Wednesdays from New Orleans) 

5 Delightful Days at Sea — Through Fare Same as All Rail 
but includes berth and meals on steamers 

A Through Transportation Line San Fran- 
cisco to New York Under One Management 

TWO DAILY TRAINS FROM SAN FRANCISCO 

"Sunset Limited" — 

Lv. Third St. Station 5:00 p.m.; Lv. Los Angeles 
8:30 a.m.; Ar. New Orleans 7:35 p.m. (3d day). 

"Sunset Express" — 

Lv. Third St. Station S:15 p.m.; Lv. Los Angeles 
12:45 p.m.; Ar. New Orleans 6:25 p.m. (4th day). 

Rail Connections North and East 

Through Pullman Standard and Tourist Equipment 
and Dining Car Service Though to New Orleans 



Daily Through Pullman Tourist Car on "Sunset Limited" 
from San Francisco to Washington, D. C. 

The Longest Through Sleeping Car Line 
in the United States 

On Your Way — See the 
APACHE TRAIL OF ARIZONA— 

By auto through the heart of "Apache Land" — a maze of 
canyons, peaks and cliffs aglow with bright colors — 120 
miles of scenic splendor. A one-day side trip or detour. 

DETOCB FROM MARICOPA through Phoenix. Roosevelt Dam 
anil r.lobe to Bowie; ok. SIDE trip from itoniE VIA 
GLOBE lo Roonevelt Diim and return. Take l'hoenix Sleeper 
daily, or Globe Sleeper Sundays. Tuesdays and Fridays from 
Los Angeles. Detour or Side Trip fare $30.00. 

You can stop off at El Pato and go by street car into 
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many historic places. 

FOR RAILROAD AND PULLMAN FARES 

Ask Southern Pacific Agents 

or Phone Sutter 4000 

SO POST ST.— FERRY STATION— THIRD ST. STATION 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 4, 1922 



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f^rTlHE school cost in San Francisco is running low," is the 
X heading of an article in the Chronicle, referring to com- 
parative expenditures on schools in San Francisco and Los Angeles. 

Far be it from us to criticise the Chronicle, which is a great 
newspaper, splendidly edited and full of civic pride. But all jour- 
nalism is done under high pressure, and journalistic impressions 
gained on the moment are not always exactly accurate. San Fran- 
cisco may not be spending as much on schools as Los Angeles, but 
it is spending all the taxpayers can afford, and a good deal more. 
There is a steady and persistent propaganda to increase the outlay 
on schools. The present State Superintendent of Schools, who is 
grooming himself for Governor some fine day, raised the school 
costs on taxpayers some twelve millions in one slap a few years 
ago by promoting the idea that school teachers were poorly paid. 
There would soon be a dearth of them, he argued, unless the gov- 
ernment increased their salaries. Most of that was shallow political 
propaganda, but it worked, and the taxpayers have twelve millions 
more a year to fork out. 

No Quarrel With School Teachers 

Now we have no quarrel with the school teachers. They are 
worthy people and entitled to good pay. But everything in this 
world is comparative, and people cannot all get bankers' salaries. 
The school teachers are well off compared with other women who 
work. They do not get large salaries, 'tis true, but their work is 
steady and their hours not long. They have several vacations a 
year with full pay, and if they have sick days occasionally they 
are not docked. For a woman who has to earn her living and does 
not have to put in a long time on preparatory arduous professional 
studies, there is no better opening than our public schools. 
Los Angeles a Typical Boomer 

Los Angeles has spent over eight millions on schools while San 
Francisco has been spending less than half as much, declares the 
article, which was telegraphed from Washington as part of a census 
report. What census report? We hear all the time of census re- 
ports from Washington, but every bureau in Washington is getting 
up "census reports." Whenever a bunch of politicians want to put 
over something, they sta?t the game with a "census report from 
Washington." That gets the requisite amount of publicity. The next 
move is to spring some constitutional or charter amendment on the 
unlucky taxpayers. 

Newspapers Stand In 

The newspapers aid the schemes of the political bureaucrats at 
Washington or Sacramento by readiness to publish propaganda. In 
this respect the Chronicle is not very discerning, but many news- 
papers seem to invite propaganda by the readiness with which they 
print articles calculated to increase the cost of government. The 
editors are deceived by the idea that they are doing a public service 
when they are really playing into the hands of wily taxeaters. 
Not All Schools Overcrowded 

There has been a local propaganda for several years in favor of 
building more schools in San Francisco than are really needed. It 
is true that in some districts the schools are crowded, but in others 
the attendance is far from excessive. The paternal notion of gov- 
ernment sways Supervisors and Boards of Education. Public school 
pupils must not be asked to walk two or three blocks to school, 
when a new school can be built for them at a cost of half a million 
dollars, and some contractor is waiting to take the school bonds at 



a disguised discount, which he makes up in overcharging for his 
work. In that way the taxpayers are doubly robbed. They are 
taxed to erect buildings not actually needed, and they pay more 
for the work than it is worth. 

Ornamental Education a Foolish Fad 
We need to get it out of our heads that it is the duty of the 
community to supply an ornamental education to every child, as if 
he were a pupil of an expensive private school. The duty of the 
State is to give the young citizen enough schooling to prevent him 
from being illiterate. If he wants a higher education, and has the 
talent, he will get it. If he has not the talent, he cannot be made 
a scholar by feeding him up on all kinds of ornamental studies that 
he has not the time nor the capacity to digest. He wastes his time 
on useless studies and wastes the money of the taxpayers when he 
emerges from his grammar school an ignoramus, whose education 
is just sufficient to enable him to study the sporling columns of the 
newspapers. 

Forcing ornamental education on the multitude, so that car con- 
ductors and hod-carriers can talk of biology and psycho-analysis, 
is a crime against the population. People should be made to pay 
something for their education, and then they would appreciate it. 
But to force free ornamental studies on the proletariat and thrust 
free text books into their hands, and build free public schools at 
every corner, is merely altruistic paternalism running mad and de- 
generating into cold, calculating political graft. 
"It Makes a Big Difference" 

The building trades are considering injunctions against material 
contractors, to compel them to sell to any person. Not so long 
ago the building trades of San Francisco were devising ways and 
means to prevent any contractor from buying materials unless he 
approved of boycott in aid of the closed shop. The News Letter 
warned the building trades then that they might be "hoisted with 
their own petard," as the closed shop unionists represented only 
a small minority, and the majority might turn about and boycott 
them. That is their present danger, and may grow acute. 

When people invoke illegal pressure to make themselves masters 
of the industrial field, they should always remember that others 
can do the same, and may prove to be more numerous. Majorities 
rule in the long run, though organized minorities may make a pro- 
tracted fight to control the situation. 

Whatever the material men may do to discriminate against the 
building trades, it could never be half as bad as the building trades 
in San Francisco has done against American boys by denying them 
the legal right to learn useful trades. Forced out of the field of 
remunerative work, boys have been left to become hoboes or 
criminals. 

We do not cite that lawless act of the closed shop building trades 
to justify any illegal action by material men. But it simply illus- 
trates the old proverb, "It makes a big difference whose ox is 
gored." 






It was Abraham Lincoln who said: "Prohibition will work great 
injury to the cause of temperance. It is a species of intemperance 
within itself, for it goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it 
attempts to control a man's appetite by legislation, and makes a 
crime out of things that are not crimes. A prohibition law strikes 
a blow at the very principles on which our government is founded." 



March 4, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



II 



War and Price Fluctuations 



1810 


165 


1814 


235 


1819 


137 


* 
* 


1811 


160 


1815 


185 


1820 


117 


* 


1812 


162 


1816 


157 


1821 


112 


•> 


1813 


189 


1817 


159 






* 



Here are some interesting facts about prices declining after seri- 
ous wars. The Department of Labor has collected them for a 
hundred years. In the periods following each war there has been 
much the same inconvenience and suffering. The question upper- 
most in all minds seems to have been, when will prices go down? 
The newspapers at the time of the War of 1812 and of the Civil 
War were full of the discussion. The spirit of the cartoons seems 
to have been much the same. Following each war there have been 
pessimists who have argued that civilization was rapidly coming to 
an end. The discussion of the situation, the arguments advanced, 
the hopes and fears expressed after each of these three wars, have 
remarkable similarity. 

The statistics for the three war periods when placed side by side 
tell the story or much of it at a glance. The prices of food are 
expressed by an index number which is calculated from the average 
prices for five years before the war. 

Index Number 

14 2 

15 1 

16 1 

17 1 

It will be seen that the jump in prices at the close of the War of 
1812 was violent, and that the reaction was equally sudden. In a 
period of five years the reaction, which was uninterrupted, had 
reached a lower range than before the war. 

The comparison with a similar period during and subsequent to 
the Civil War shows a remarkably close parallel. In this table the 
index number is again calculated on the basis of the average for 
five years before the war. 

Index Number 

1865 200 

1866 176 

1867 159 

1868 148 

The rise, it will be seen, was much more violent at the close of 
the Civil War than after the War of 1812. This is explained, of 
course, by the violence of the struggle, the size of the armies en- 
gaged and other factors. 

The period covering, the World War to date, it will be seen, 
parallels those of the other conflicts. It is, of course, incomplete, 
but a comparison with other war fluctuations would indicate that 
the movement of prices in the immediate future will be steadily, if 
not sharply, downward. The index number is calculated as in the 
other tables. 

Index Number 
1916 126 

1917 178 

1918 200 

The fluctuation of prices following the three wars has been very 
similar. If the parallel continues, which seems reasonable, the fu- 
ture trend of prices may be anticipated. As in the period following 
each of the other wars, there has been a violent drop, which has 
been followed by a partial recovery. More or less stable prices 
have then continued for about a year, perhaps longer. The next 
movement has been a further decline in prices less violent than the 
former, and continued over a longer period, which has. in turn, 
been followed by a period of stable prices. Judging from the past, 
wages in general promise to remain high for a considerable period. 



1861 


93 


1862... 


...109 


1863 


137 


1864 


176 



1869 


142 


1870 


. .131 


1871 


93 



1913 


102 


1914. ... 


102 


1915 


102 



1919 
1920 
1921 



.219 
.250 
.150 



— Truth serum is the latest scientific discovery of the doctors. 
They need it so much themselves it should be tried sparingly, as it 
may kill them all off. 



'•• * •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• * * * * * * * * * * * * .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. * .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .«.^„{. ^, * 



Established 1865 

Larkins 

Automobile 

Painting 



Buying a Larkins Paint Job is 

like buying good tires— you get 
more miles to the dollar. 

The durability of the Larkins 
Paint Job makes unnecessary 
the laying up of the car for paint- 
ing soon again. 

Both time and money are saved. 



Larkins & Co. 

First Avenue and Geary Street 
San Francisco 

Makers of the Larkins Top 



* 

+ 

MMM<Mt»MMW I >HIIMM I I»MWMMMt 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 4, 1922 




ociot 




THE MARDI GRAS 



SEVERAL thousand persons on Tuesday 
night danced at the most beautiful 
Mardi Grr s ever held in San Francisco. 

Long before 10 o'clock, the hour for the 
arrival of Queen Scheherazade and her 
court, the Auditorium was filled and dancing 
was enjoyed by those who could not wait 
for the dramatic pantomime that marked the 
coronation. With a trumpeting blare of 
music, the curtain went up, the applause of 
the thousands drowning the sounds of the 
two orchestras. 

Seated on a high throne was Queen 
Scheherazade (Mrs. Richard McCreery), for 
whose election to the place of honor society 
had spent $40,000 in less than two hours' 
voting. About her were her attendants, 
dancing girls, odalisques and houris, grouped 
to enhance the flame motif that marked the 
pageant. They wore Oriental costumes in 
hues of fire, the finest silks, gauzy chiffons, 
gold and silver cloth forming their costumes. 

As they were grouped on the black and 
orange dais about the throne, the colors 
shaded from pale gold to deep orange and 
crimson, every hue of fire forming part of 
the picture. 

No Queen Scheherazade of legend was 
ever lovelier than Mrs. McCreery, her dark, 
laughing eyes, her smiling grace and dainty 
figure befitting the role pjrfectly. 

Her robes were superb, a masterpiece of 
costuming. The head-dress of white ostrich 
plumes, each plume tipped off with peacock 
feathers, was clasped to the coiffure with a 
jeweled coronet ,the hair being braided with 
strands of pearls. Long sapphire and dia- 
mond earrings and a fortune in other jewels 
graced the wearer. No Mardi Gras queen 
ever wore such jewels. 



The costume winners were announced by 
the committee at midnight by Joseph O. 
Tobin. The winners were: 
Women 

First Prize — Mrs. Elysse Hopkins, French 
Actress. 

Second Prize — Mrs. Robert A. Roos, 
Egyptian Princess. 

Third Prize — Miss Eleanor Spreckels, 
Arabian Princess. 

Men 

First Prize — Lucien Labaudt, Hindu-Per- 
sian Warrior. 

Second Prize — Horace B. Clifton, Japa- 
nese Samurai. 

Third Prize — Francisco Duenas, Toreador. 

The judges were Mrs. Henry Dutton, Mrs. 
Gus -Taylor and Templeton Crocker. 

Hundreds of those at the ball enjoyed 
themselves in the supper room, where the 
cabaret kept the revelers entertained for 
hours. There were many parties of twelve 
to twenty, many more or eight and scores 
of smaller parties. 

The cabaret entertainment was staged by 
Fanchon and Marco of the Little Club, with 
about forty of their cabaret entertainers giv 
ing a continuous program that lasted from 
midnight to near dawn. 




oAll that the "f^ame 
Implies 



Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRAXCISCO 

VAX NESS ASH PACIFIC AVES. 
Telephone ProNpecl 880U 



Busy Cupid 

— Miss Laura Hay Chapman and John B. 
Baldwin were married Monday morning and 
took their departure immediately after the 
ceremony for Portland, where they will 
make their home for the next six months. 
Just the members of the family were present 
at the marriage. The bride is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Hay Chapman, and 
the sister of Bruce, Victor, Lorimer and 
Patrick Chapman. Young Baldwin is the 
son of Mrs. William Sproule and the brother 
of Miss Marie Louise Baldwin. He is asso- 
ciated in business with the Associated Oil 
Company. 

— Rainbow Lane at The Fairmont was the 
setting for the wedding of Miss Henriette 
Jacobs, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leon 
Jacobs, to Bernard E. Greiff, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. I. B. Myers, on Wednesday even- 
ing, February 28. The approach to the 
altar was flanked on either side with palms 
and ferns, the bridal party standing under 
a canopy of gold and blue. The ceremony 
was read by Rabbi J. Neito. The bride, a 
pretty brunette, wore a handsome gown of 
white satin with an over-dress of net elabo- 
rately beaded, and carried a shower bouquet 
of orchids and lilies of the valley. The long 
bridal veil, which was also worn by the 
mo'.her and grandmother, was fastened to 
the hair with a wreath of lilies of the val- 
ley. The only attendant of the bride was 



the maid of honor, Miss Elayne Jacobson, 
gowned in pink taffeta, carrying a shower 
bouquet of bride roses and lilies of the val- 
ley. Leland Myers was best man. A dinner- 
dance followed the wedding reception, the 
horseshoe table being handsomely decorated 
in pink roses and ferns. The place cards 
were hand painted. After a honeymoon 
spent in the South, Mr. and Mrs. Greiff will 
make their home in San Francisco. 
Luncheons 

— Mrs. Lloyd M. Robbins entertained at 
luncheon at the Town and Country Club 
Monday in honor of her niece. Miss Mary 
Baldwin of New York, who is visiting at the 
Robbins home, on Sacramento street. Miss 
Gertrude Lawrence Murray and Miss Mary 
Cushman, both of New York, shared the 
honors with Miss Baldwin. 

— In honor of Miss Elsie Bishop and Mrs. 
Mildred Pollok, two of the season's brides- 
elect, Mrs. Parker Whitney entertained at 
luncheon and bridge at the Hotel St. Fran- 
cis Monday. 

— Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Judge were 
hosts at a luncheon party Sunday at the 
Burlingame Country Club, where they enter- 
tained a party of ten. Covers were placed 
for Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hussey, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Hobart. Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Thayer Iaccaci, Mr. and Mrs. William Dun- 
can, Miss Ysabel Chase and Mr. Russell 
Wilson. 

— Mrs. A. Howard Turner was the gra- 
cious hostess at a handsomely appointed 
luncheon in the Grey room at The Fairmont 
on Monday. The decorations of the three 



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352 SUTTER STREET 

(ABOVE GRANT AVE.) 



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352 SUTTER STREET 

TELEPHONIC DOUGLAS 3801 



March 4, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



tables at which the guests were seated were 
especially beautiful, being a profusion of 
almond blossoms and ribbons to match in 
hue their delicate coloring. Bridge was en- 
joyed during the remainder of the afternoon, 
several hundred friends were there. Those 
who received were Mrs. William Carey Van 
Fleet, Mrs. Othello Scribner, Mrs. Laughlin 
McLean, Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler, Mrs. 
Benjamin Ide Wheeler, Mrs. Louis Mont- 
eagle, Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz, Mrs. Edson 
Adams, Miss Elizabeth and Miss Ellita 
Adams, Miss Amanda McNear, Miss Doris 
and Miss Betty Schmiedell. 

Dinners 

— Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Masten cele- 
brated the thirty-third anniversary of their 
wedding with a handsome dinner given at 
their home ori Washington street Sunday 
evening. 

— Mr. and Mrs. H. Van C. Torchiana 
entertained at dinner in the Rose room at 
the Palace Hotel Wednesday evening. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Paul Thayer Iaccaci, who 
are visiting here from New York, were the 
guests of honor at a dinner given on last 
Thursday evening in Burlingame by Mr. and 
Mrs. Mountford Wilson. A large party was 
entertained. 

— Complimenting Miss Frances Pringle, 
debutante daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
J. Pringle, Dr. and Mrs. Henry Kiersted and 
Mrs. Charles N. Felton entertained at a de- 
lightful dinner-dance at the Fairmont Hotel 
last Saturday evening. 

— One of the most attractive affairs of 
the week was the dinner-dance given by 
Mrs. Charles N. Felton and Mrs. Henry S. 
Kiersted as joint hostesses in the Venetian 
room at The Fairmont. Miss Frances Pringle 
was guest of honor. The table was beauti- 
fully appointed in its settings and decora- 
tions of almond blossoms. 

Teas 

— Mrs. James J. Foley was hostess to 
some of her friends at tea Monday at the 
Hotel St. Francis, the affair being a farewell 
in honor of Mrs. Eugene Amman, who, with 
her husband, will soon leave for the Orient 
to make a tour of the world. The Ammans 



Your best glasses 

tor evening wear should be the now rimless 
eeml- lm Islble "I !olonlal" lensba m 
in an eyei 

— yellow Bold for datls uae A distinctive 
and i ":i ut i t'n i combination which appeals 
t(» those wh :i Btyle 

.tint comfort ut glae 



\V. I). Fpnniinor,' 



.1. W. Dnvln 



A. R. Fennlmore 




Sun Francis™ - 1B1 Poet, I50S MUsion Sta, 
Berkeley - - - - -10fi Slmtturk Avenue 
Ortkhinil ------ 1221 Brondway 



will be gone two years. A number of affairs 
have been given in their honor. 

—Mrs. W. L. McClintock, a bride of the 
past year, had several score of her friends 
at tea on Saturday, the receiving party and 
a few others remaining for dinner, bridge 
and dancing, some of the men friends and 
husbands coming in for the evening. The 
McClintock tea was given in honor of Miss 
Lillian Newbauer, who returned not long 
ago from a long stay in the East. 

— Mrs. James McNab, who makes her 
home at The Fairmont, entertained a num- 
ber of her friends informally at an attrac- 
tive tea on Saturday afternoon in Laurel 
Court. The guests were seated at two round 
tables prettily decorated with the flowers 
popular at this season of the year. After 
tea, cards occupied the attention of the la- 
dies for the remainder of the afternoon. 

— Mrs. Henry J. Crocker and her daugh- 
ters, Miss Marian and Miss Mary Julia 
Crocker, gave a large reception Tuesday aft- 
ernoon at their home at Laguna and Wash- 
ington streets. 

— Mrs. James Carolan of The Fairmont 
entertained a number of her friends at an 
informal tea and bridge party in the Empire 
room on Monday. 

— Miss Regina Cuneo assembled a num- 
ber of friends at a delightful tea in Laurel 
Court at The Fairmont on Tuesday. The 
table was bright with daffodils, and silver 
candelabra with yellow shades added to the 
attractiveness of the decorations. 
In Town and Out 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Stimson left Thurs- 
day for Europe and will be away all sum- 
mer. They took their automobile and their 
chauffeur, and will motor through Frai.je 
and Italy. 

— Mr. Templeton Crocker left for New 
York Wednesday to join Mrs. Crocker, and 
they will sail for Europe on March 1 7. 

— Miss Mabel Mcintosh arrived Wednes- 
day for a visit with her sister, Mrs. Robert 
Menzies, in San Rafael. Miss Mcintosh has 
just returned from Palestine, where she did 
remarkable work with the Near East relief, 
as well as having served for many months 
with the British Y. W. C. A. in Jerusalem. 

— Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor returned 
Monday evening from Southern California 
to preside at the meeting Tuesday afternoon 
of the University Fine Arts Society. 
Intimations 

— Mrs. Reginald Brooke left Wednesday 
for Seattle and will sail from there for the 
Orient, and after several weeks' travel there 
will proceed to her home in London. 

— Mr. and Mrs. James Rupert Mason 
have decided to join the Peter F. Dunne 
party, leaving March 6 for Europe. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Rethers Jr. are 
receiving the congratulations of their friends 
on the birth of a son. Mrs. Rethers is the 
former Miss Adele Chevalier. 

— A recruit from society to the moving 
pictures is Mrs. Dorothy Churchill Hess of 
Napa, who has joined the Mission Film Cor- 
poration in Los Angeles. Mrs. Hess, as Miss 
Churchill, was a popular society girl here 



and took part in a number of amateur per- 
formances. She has a charming singing 
voice and is extremely pretty. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Marcel Cerf and their 
daughters, Miss Charlotte and Miss Elizabeth 
Cerf, will leave for Europe in May and will 
be away for two years. They will spend the 
summer in Switzerland aifd later go to 
France and Italy. The Misses Cerf will enter 
school in Paris. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCreery are 
enterting as their house guest in Burlingame 
Mrs. Herman Duryea of New York. The 
visitor arrived last week and will be here 
another fortnight. 

— Mrs. George Lent and her sister. Miss 
Jennie Hooker, will spend the spring and 
summer in Europe. They will leave in March 
for New York and will be away until the 
late fall. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Eli Wiel have purchased 
the Richard Girvin place in Menlo, and are 
planning to take possession this spring. 



THE PLACE FOR LUNCHEON 

On these fine days one obtains an unsur- 
passed view of the bay and the surrounding 
country from the Fairmont Hotel. Lunch at 
the Fairmont is all the more enjoyable after 
enjoying the panorama of shore and moun- 
tain. Service is perfect and cuisine unsur- 
passed at the Fairmont. 



"What!" said the indignant old gentle- 
man, "you want to marry my daughter? 
Why, sir, it was only a few years ago that 
you were caddying for me." 

"Yes, sir," the young man replied; "but 
I don't intend to let that stand in the way. 
I hope I have sense enough to realize that 
a very bad golfer may make a fairly good 
falher-in-law." — Boston Transcript. 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
i nous hair permanently removed by 
my latest Improved multiple needle nut. 
chine, Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street, Suite 723 Whitney Bldg. 

Phone Douglas 5232 
Oakland, Suite 424. First Nntl. Bank Bldg. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Hake Your Innervations 
;it City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 
L'nder Management CARL, S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • • • * 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • ■ ■ • 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • • ♦ • 

FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

• • • • • * 

EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 4, 1922 



DECISION OF INTEREST TO 
POLICYHOLDERS 

Income protection insurance is becoming 
very popular, and the recent decision of 
Judge Shortall in the case of Policyholders 
against the Western States Life is, therefore, 
of general intenest. 

William E. Wright bought an income pol- 
icy, under which the Western States Life 
Company agreed to pay his mother and 
sister $25 per month for twenty years after 
his death. It was provided in the policy that 
Wright could, at any time, change the policy 
to make the net value thereof payable im- 
mediately upon his death, by giving written 
notice to the insurance company, and pre- 
senting the policy for endorsement of the 
change. 

Upon the death of Wright, the company 
accepted its liability under the original con- 
tract and tendered the monthly check to the 
beneficiaries. They refused the monthly pay- 
ment and demanded immediate payment of 
the cash value of the policy. They claimed 
that Wright, shortly before his death, had 
written the company requesting that the 
value of the policy be paid upon his death. 
No such letter ever came to the company, 
and the beneficiaries admitted that the policy 
had never been sent in for proper endorse- 
ment of the change. 

Judge Shortall very properly decided in 
favor of the company on the face record of 
the policy that payment of insurance should 
be made as specified. 

The company has thousands of policy- 
holders who have bought income protection 
policies to safeguard their loved ones against 
want, and it would be a gross breach of 
trust to violate the terms of such policies. 
Financially it would make no difference to 
the company, but it would make a great 
difference to the policyholders to know their 
contracts would be faithfully carried out, 
and not violated even at the demand of a 
beneficiary. 



the center of the room, the book shelves, 
writing desk and other pieces, therefore, 
stand in their proper places. 

The rocking chair before the fireplace in 
Poe's living room is the original. The bed 
with its cord mattress, on which Virginia Poe 
died, has also been restored. The rest of the 
furniture, while not original, is faithful to 
the period, and preserves the appropriate 
atmosphere. The description of these rooms 
mentions the presence of the bird cages, for 
Poe was fond of birds, and today several 
canaries in old-fashioned cages sing for the 
visitors as they did for the author of "The 
Raven." 

The old bedstead originally stood in the 
attic, two of its posts having been cut away 
that it might be pushed back under the 
sloping roof to gain space. This simple piece 
of furniture vividly recalls the great tragedy 
of Poe's life. Virginia Poe occupied it in 
her last illness, and when it was found im- 
possible to heat the attic she was brought 
downstairs to a tiny room off the living 
room, where she died. The bed stands today 
in the little room beside the narrow window 
with a single chair for furniture. 

The original kitchen, which is small even 
by modern apartment house standards, has 
been no less carefully restored. The fire- 
place has been rebuilt with brick taken from 
old houses of the neighborhood. The holes 
burned in the wooden floor before the fire 
have been left undisturbed. In the old-fash- 
ioned stove, the china in the cupboards, the 
cooking utensils on the walls, there is not a 
single incongruous note. 



RESTORATION OF POE'S COTTAGE 

The Edgar Allan Poe cottage in the Bronx 
is being restored, both inside and out, to its 
original appearance. The work has been 
entrusted to several members of the New 
York Historical Society, and as far as the 
interior changes are concerned is now com- 
plete. The original appearance of the cot- 
tage has been destroyed by careless grading 
and grouping of the shrubbery. In trans- 
ferring the building to its present position 
much of its charm was lost. 

The work of restoration has been greatly 
assisted by the discovery of a detailed de- 
scription of the interior written by a visitor 
to the cottage in the early *50s. The prin- 
cipal articles of furniture are mentioned and 
even their exact positions. This record has 
made it possible to replace Poe's rocking 
chair at the left of the fireplace of the living 
room exactly where he occupied it. A grass 
mat occupied the center of the floor, leav- 
ing much bare space. The small table at 



NEW BOOKS RECEIVED 

"Caravans by Night," by Harry Hervey. 
A love adventure story of India, full of color 
and interest. The author is familiar with the 
life he depicts. Published by the Century 
Co. Price $1.90. 

"Without Compromise," a story of love 
and political intrigue, by Lillian Bennet 
Thompson and George Hubbard. Full of 
strong scenes. The heroine's appeal to the 
honor of her lover, which results in the 
death of his brother, is one. Published by 
the Century Co. Price $1.75. 

"The Isle of the Vanishing Men," by W. 
F. Alder, is a profusely illustrated and un- 
usual book of travel about New Guinea. It 
relates the experiences of twelve hunters of 
birds of paradise, and tells of cannibalism 
and other strange practices. Published by 
the Century Co. Price $2.00. 

"Fifty-Fifty," a three-act farce of love, 
luck and laughter, by Frederick G. Johnson, 
author of several plays. Published by T. S. 
Devison, Chicago. 



Authorized Simonizing Stations 




our Painting and Upholstering Depart- 
ment will he pleased to furnish estimates 
on any work. 

If your office or home furniture looks 
dull or dingy, send for a Simonizer. 

California Simonizing Co. 

1658 California Street 2345 Broadway 

San Francisco Oakland 

Ph. Prospect 3418-3419 Ph. Oakland 9523 



PYRO-VOID 

DR. HOAGLAND'S HOME TREATMENT 
for 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satlsf action Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTAL SPECIALIST 

908 Market Street, at Powell 
San Francisco 

Dept. N.I.. EatablUhed 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



THIS IS 
YOUR OPPORTUNITY 

A Small Investment Properly 
Invested Will Mean a Source of 
Fortune for Yourself or a Heri- 
tage for Your Heirs, as You 
Choose. 

A new Syndicate is just being formed to 
take over a large tract of Canadian Coal 
Lands located in British Columbia between 
two continental railroads just sixteen miles 
above Glazier Park, Montana. Get on the 
Board of* Directors with us. We are on 
the ground floor. 

JOSEPH HARRIMAN 

14th Floor Merchants Natl. Bank Bldg., 
(i25 MARKET STREET 
San Francisco, California 




Cameo 



Order from your DEALER, for trial, sample ton — more or less — PEA CO OH 
COAL. YOU will appreciate its merits, cheerful blaze, cleanliness, general sat- 
isfaction for house use. LUMP for grates ; EGG, better for stoves, costs one 
dollar less. Try both. 

CALIFORNIA CLIMATE needs no expensive FURNACE FIRE, day and night. 

Best Economical substitute CAMEO COLORADO COAL. Start nre at 6 a. m. 
to die out early evening. Order of your DEALER sample sack or more. He will 
know from 205 Hobart Building where to find either. CHARLES R. ALLEN. 



March 4. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 




omsM 



«?») 



■A 






Road Courtesy 

THE motor car transports each year in 
the United States the equivalent of 
carrying one driver 4,800,000 miles. Every 
twenty seconds the motor car transports a 
rider from Augusta to Los Angeles. Day and 
night this lonely motorist travels at the rate 
of 9133 miles a minute. Each second of the 
year $1.20 in tires has to be made, trans- 
ported, sold and fitted on a car. 

With all this stupendous cumulative activ- 
ity, can the driver recognize his share of 
responsibility to other drivers and to the 
public? For it rests in his hands whether, 
with the rapidly increasing road congestion, 
he will continue to be treated with cordiality. 

The careless driver, the thoughtless driver, 
will greatly increase the danger of motoring 
to the pedestrian, to other drivers, and to 
himself, and jeopardize the privileges he has 
hitherto enjoyed. 

What should a driver do? The rules are 
very simple: 

Keep to the right of the road. 

Slow down at crossings. 

Signal for a stop or turn to the cars be- 
hind by holding out the left hand. 

Apply brakes slowly. Change speed rales 
slowly. Drive carefully. 

Be prepared to help any motorist in trou- 
ble on roads distant from garages. 

Be prepared to give pedestrians "lifts" on 
country roads. 

Stop car and engine when meeting drovers 
with sheep, swine or cattle on country roads. 

Park only at side of roads, leaving fair 
way. 

When buying produce in the country, park 
alongside road, not on the road. 

When parking at night, leave warning 
lights. 

Have headlight dimmers and use them 
when meeting and passing other motorists 
at night. 

When picnicking, carefully put out picnic 
fires. 

When picnicking do not trespass to gather 
wild flowers, tree branches, blossoms, fruit 
or shrubs. 

When picnicking, clean up thoroughly, 
removing from sight all cans, papers and 
rubbish. 

Take hill on the right side of the road. 
Go over the crest carefully. Avoid coasting 
or speeding around curves at foot of hills. 

Be courteous to pedestrians. Do not drive 
your car at them full tilt, and laugh when 
they jump. Do not splash water on them 
as they stand at crossings or near curbs, 
waiting for you to pass. 

Avoid street cars carefully at stops. 



King's Car Now a Hack 

The King of the Belgians' automobile, in 
which King Albert toured the battlefront 
during the war, is now doing duty as a 
motor hack at the railway station in Balti- 
more. It has a costly limousine body on a 
long wheelbase, and the interior, from the 
velvet covering on the floor to the dome in 
the roof, is finished in mahogany and oak 
inlaid. The seats are fashioned more like 
costly furniture than like the usual automo- 
bile seat, and are covered with heavy gray 
whipcord material. The royal colors that 
once decorated these coverings have been 
removed. 

Directly in front of the front seat is a 
miniature chiffonier. It is equipped with a 
disappearing mirror and drawers which open 
to the touch of hidden springs. In these are 
receptacles for brushes and shaving ma- 
terials. The history of the limousine from 
the time it left the ownership of King Albert 
is rather vague. Douglas Fairbanks bought 
the machine while in Europe and brought it 
to this country to use in making several pic- 
tures. It was sold several times afterward, 
and just recently came into the possession 
of a Baltimore hack company. 



The motorists who will compete at San 
Carlos speedway on Easter Sunday, April 
16, desire to have the distance cut to 150 
miles instead of 250. That being the case, 
the pilots expect to hang up an average of 
I 15 miles an hour. The starting of the race 
at 3 o'clock would give spectators plenty of 
time for church going and an early return 
for dinner. 



REALTORS OPPOSED TO BONUS 

The Real Estate Board of New York has 
placed itself on record in the Senate and 
House of Representatives and with President 
Harding against the proposal to levy new 
taxes to provide the proposed soldier bonus, 
and against the bonus and specifically 
against the tax on the transfer of real estate. 

Richard O. Chittick. secretary of the Real 
Estate Board of New York, issued the fol- 
lowing statement recently explaining the 
action of the board: 

"The Real Estate Board more than once 
has taken the position that the American 
people ought to spare no effort to provide 
to the limit for those who were wounded in 
the late war and for the dependents of those 
who died, and it believes that this is the 
universal sentiment of the American public. 

"On the other hand, it can see no reason 
whatever why more than three years after 
the end of the war bonuses should be paid. 



not only to those who are dependent, but to 
all who served in the war, whether at home 
or abroad. Such a payment cannot be ex- 
cused except on the ground that it is a re- 
ward for men who did their duty and at the 
time were proud in the consciousness that 
they were doing their duty. Would it not be 
really an affront to the great mass of men 
who from patriotic impulses offered their 
services for their country? 

"An attempt is being made to confuse the 
temporary embarrassment of some of these 
ex-soldiers, due to industrial depression, 
with the question of the payment of a 
bonus, and it is the apparent intention of 
the Congress to saddle upon the country, on 
this pretext, a debt of from two and one- 
half to five billion dollars. 

"The interest on amortization on the 
existing debt of the United States is more 
than the entire expense of government prev- 
ious to the World War, and must be met 
annually by taxation. The burden of this 
further enormous sum, no matter how it is 
levied, must fall upon the entire community 
and would be calamitous. 

"The Real Estate Board objects specifi- 
cally to a new burden of taxation upon real 
estate. The weight of taxation was not so 
long ago referred to by Governor Miller of 
New York State as follows: 

" 'Seventy per cent of the tax, State and 
local, is contributed by real property that is 
now paying on the average of 30 per cent 
of its gross income in taxes. That situation 
discourages land owning and aggravates the 
rent and housing problems in our congested 
centers.' 

"This proposed tax of one-half of 1 per 
cent on real estate transfers would, of course, 
be theoretically paid by the seller, but actu- 
ally by the purchaser of the property, be- 
cause it would be added to the price and 
in all probability a great deal more than the 
tax would be reflected in the price." 

The foregoing objections were sum- 
marized in a telegram sent to Senators and 
Representatives and to the President by the 
Real Estate Board of New York. 



Money in Grain 

option on 10.000 bushels 
of wheal or corn, No farther ri>.k. A movement 
of 6c from price gives inlty to 

take $500; 4c. $400; 3c, $300. etc. Write for 
particulars and free market letter. 

in\ BBTOK0 1 i> \ll.\ Gl IDE 

Bonthweal Braarh, PnkCO, 1004 Baltimore Av*. 

KanMU < ity, Ho, 



Beat Bqolpped and Most MODERN* 
GAB LGE Weal of Chicago 

The Century 



Two Works from Union Square 

(i7.*5 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 
Between Tayl<r and Jones 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 4, 1922 




PL/E/ASTJR,E/'S WAND 



Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Victor Herbert at the California 

Victor Herbert, popular composer and 
conductor, is the main attraction this week 
at the California Theater. His participa- 
tion in each performance is filling the house 
to capacity, and justly so, for his place in 
the music world is among the highest. At 
the Sundiy concert rare tributes were con- 
ceded the distinguished guest conductor; his 
interpretation of the "Irish Rhapsody" 
brought encore after encore, his admirers 
recalling him three times. The scenic atmos- 
phere is well planned and pleasing to the 
eye, as are most of this management's con- 
ceptions. Even without the film attractions 
the bill this week would be quite worth 
while. 



Columbia 

David Warfield in "The Return of Peter 
Grimm" continues to draw large and inter- 
ested audiences to the Columbia. Society is 
at the moment pleased to take a polite in- 
terest in the occult, and the absorbing story 
of Peter has a greater following than ever 
it had before. 

On Monday Ethel Barrymore opens with 
"Declasse," and delighted devotees at the 
shrine of Miss Barrymore are waiting with 
happy hearts to worship anew. This radiant 
star brings an excellent company with her, 
and among the names in her support it is a 
real pleasure to see that of Virginia Chau- 
venet, a gifted young actress whom San 
Franciscans have often wished to see again 
since a memorable pre-war New Year's eve, 
when her reputation as a raconteuse was 
established here. 



Activities of the Aged at Alcazar 

Who said that Gladys George can't act? 
Never on this page shall such a statement 
be permitted. Her beautiful characterization 
of the part of "Angie" (just a sweet old 
lady who has to leave her cottage and go 
into an old folks' home) establishes this 
charming little actress in the good opinion 
of those who know what acting is. The very 
sight of her in the prologue to "Old Lady 
31" touches your heart, for lo, she has 
grown old! The loveliness of youth that lies 
in turn of cheek and light in eye, that has 
gone from her; the loveliness of age that 
shows itself in tender, smiling mouth, soft 
sympathetic voice, that has come. A most 
precious little old lady, Miss George makes; 
one likes to think it's more of a peep into 
the future, say forty years from now, than 
the work of a few moments in the dressing 
room, this transformation of hers. Dudley 
Ayres is going to be a delightful old man, 
too, and as popular with the ladies then as 
now. They all grew old so characteristically, 
our Alcazar friends; nice Anna MacNaugh- 
tan, a buxom "Blossy" with a beau; Emily 



Pinter, rather a rakish old girl, untidy at 
the waistline; Gladys Emmons, precise and 
prickly, of perfect decorum; Charles Yule 
with an unruly wig and a wart on his nose; 
Ned Doyle, with his pipe and his profanity 
and terror of "the sex." Anne Berryman 
and Ben Erway as the young lovers were 
interesting, but not important; it was the 
old folks' innings. And how infinitely more 
entertaining, these youngsters "playing old," 
than an aged actor taking on the habili- 
ments of youth! 



Tivoli 

Even since this critic saw beautiful John 
Barrymore in "The Strange Case of Dr. 
Jeykel and Mr. Hyde" it has been a gone 
case of "there's only one man in all this 
world for me." (And I knew his father, 
too!) Adoration of this kind lives long on 
memory, then sometimes it weakens and dies 
away, and sometimes the place of the adored 
one is filled by another image. Not so with 
me; I have been true to John all these 
many months, and a great joy filled my 
faithful heart when I learned that in "The 
Lotus Eater" he would appear to me again. 
Scarce had casement of boxoffice oped than 
I was eagerly pressing money on the man- 
agement (seldom it is that we of the press 
do such pressing!), that I might gaze again 
upon this god-like lad and delight my jaded 
soul with his genius. I find it is impossible 
for me to contemplate him in the calm, cold 
light of reason, and for your perusal to 
comment and criticize, this blessed Barry- 
more. (You see, 1 knew his mother, too!) 
Shades of Maurice Barrymore, handsome, 
clever, and